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  • South Indian River Fishing Report 12/5

    December 5, 2008

    INSHORE:

    Fantastic weather and great fishing awaited anglers this week. Mild temperatures and winds provided us with some excitement on the water. In spite of cool water, the fish are out there feeding and it's a great time of year to fish the Indian River.

    Rich Dickerson was out with me this past week and we enjoyed lots of action early with ladyfish, trout and jacks and later in the day we chased redfish and Rich hooked a nice red until it got off. Josh Lukat, with brother, Kyle, and friend, Austin, came out to celebrate Josh's Birthday. Once again we began the day with hoards of ladyfish, jacks and trout and the guys ended up their day with some nice trout and Kyle losing a slot redfish. Clint from the Fishing Center and I went out for a fun day of fishing. We found big reds and trout in the shallow water and boated several big trout to end up the day. There are some big fish out there on the flats!

    Trout season is still close, but catch and release trout action has been hot lately. Big trout are in the shallow water as the sun warms things up. Redfish are also coming onto the flats as well. You can find them in one to three feet of water once things warm up out there. We used soft baits and MirrOLures to find some nice trout this week and even hook up with a few redfish. Snook are also patrolling the edges of the flats. Harbor Branch up north and any of the flats south towards the Power Plant have been good areas this week. Night anglers are still catching some slots and a good number of shorts this week. Don't forget that snook season closes December 15th. You still have a few days to catch that slot!

    If just fun is what you are looking for......there are large schools of ladyfish and jacks on the flats to keep your rod bending for hours. We have fished three to five feet of water when just wanting a little fun fishing this week. The inlet has held bluefish, mackerel and ladyfish in large numbers. Bridge anglers are still enjoying lots of sand perch, black drum, snapper and sheephead from the catwalks. Live or dead shrimp always get you some action around the bridges. Pompano have been along the surf and down by the power lines for those interested in some great table fare. Shrimp or sand fleas are the best baits for them. Not many reports of flounder yet, but everyone is anticipating their arrival. We had lots of exciting action out there!

    Tip of the Week:

    Jerk baits have been working great for us lately. Colors aren't as important as working them properly. We have been slowly popping them along the bottom and letting them sit for a few seconds in between pops. Most hits have been of the drop or when it lies motionless on the bottom. DOA CAL jerk baits in rootbeer, silver mullet or green back colors have been our best producers this week. I use 1/16 or 1/8 oz. jig heads so they will easily work over the very shallow flats. Have some fun this week on the Indian River!

    As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

    Good Fishing and Be Safe,
    Captain Charlie Conner
    www.fishtalescharter.com

    email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

    772-284-3852

    Kyle, Josh and Austin enjoyed a good day fishing the waters of the Indian River......





    Comment


    • SW FL-Bonita Beach: True Black Grouper & Good Fishing t

      A weather-front came through on Monday, 12/1, brought some rain, and left us with high winds and very rough seas. So Tuesday, Erwin and Millie Matusiak traded their offshore fishing plans for some backwater fishing in Estero Bay. We fished the shoreline with live shrimp and, while trying to stay sheltered from the cold north wind, we managed to catch seven keeper mangrove snapper and five nice sheepshead, the largest of which was 18 ½ inches. We also released a 16 inch redfish and a 20 inch snook.

      Wednesday morning, I fished a catch-and-release trip, along the edges of Estero Bay with David Hellberg and son, Matt. We had steady action all morning and released twenty-five sheepshead to 15 inches and twenty-five mangrove snapper, ten of which were keeper-size. We also released two 20 inch snook.

      Rick Szymanski and Al Ortenzo fished offshore with me Thursday in calm waters (finally!) west of New Pass in 46 feet. We limited out on big mangrove snapper, catching twenty of those to 18 ¼ inches. We released gag and red grouper just short of legal size and some triggerfish. These bigger snapper are great fun to catch and great eating too.

      Friday morning brought calm seas of less than one foot so, once anglers George Flanders and Mark Lyda heard about the good snapper-bite offshore, they changed their original plans to fish the backwaters and headed out about twenty miles with me. We fished in 47 feet with live shrimp and caught seventeen mangrove snapper to 17 inches, one keeper mutton snapper at 16 ½ inches, five keeper lane snapper measuring 11 and 12 inches, and a few whitebone porgies. We released lots of gag and red grouper shorts.

      Leon Dargis and Bob Rose picked a great morning to fish offshore—it was smooth as glass Saturday morning in 47 feet, about 22 miles west of New Pass. We fished with live shrimp and caught our federal limit of twenty nice mangrove snapper (ten per angler), all between 14 and 18 inches. We released about thirty additional mangs. The big prize of the day was a keeper 23 inch true black grouper that weighed eight pounds ( photo attached.) True blacks are a lot more unusual to catch around here than gag grouper are. We had one gag grouper on the line too but, as we reeled it up, an eight-foot bull-shark bit it, leaving us with 18 inches of mangled gag grouper—I think it was a decent sized gag until the shark helped himself to more than his share. We also caught four keeper lane snapper to 13 inches, whitebone porgies to 14 inches, and released triggerfish and four mutton snapper up to 15 7/8 inches (just 1/8 inch short of keeper-size.) It was an excellent morning for offshore fishing.

      The photo shown below is of angler Scott Kempfert with an 18 inch sheepshead, caught on a live shrimp on a recent inshore Fishbuster Charter.
      Captain Dave Hanson
      Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
      Bonita Beach, FL
      239 947-1688
      fishbuster@comcast.net
      http://www.fishbustercharters.com

      Comment


      • December Fishing Report - Daytime Swordfish offshore

        Lady Pamela II Fishing Report - 1st week of December

        John Mannino and his four children came down from Long Island, New York to head out on the Lady Pamela II with Captain Paul and I in search of "strictly swordfish and dolphin - NO sailfish!" Will do, John. We got a hold of live pilchards and headed offshore trolling for some mahi - mahi. We slipped a wahoo bait down there just for fun. All of a sudden a quadruple header was on. Nice size dolphin, 10 - 12 lb'ers. Captain Paul and I started throwing live pilchards everywhere, and it was working. We had 4 fish on at all times. We caught every fish in the school, 13 dolphin hit the deck, most of them up to 18 lbs. Trolling gear was back in and ready to go - 30 minutes went by of fishing and not catching. After all that mahi - mahi action, they were getting antsy. John and the kids wanted to switch it up a little and see what was up with the swordfish bite. As we were getting ready to make the run to fertile grounds, the wahoo bait started screamin'! John's son jumped in the fighting chair, Captain Paul was leadering him up, I grabbed the gaff and could've sworn it was at least a 100 lb wahoo! Captain Paul said "no way, a sailfish!" John's son fought his first sailfish ever, a nice one too, an 82 incher. Fishing was going great at this point, everybody was having a good time, but to put the icing on the cake, we needed a swordfish. When we got to our destination, we made our first daytime drop of the day with two squids, a 100 ft leader and a shiny, serrated 11/0 hook. We were ready. After 30 minutes of just waiting and wishing, John was hooked with his first daytime sword. John landed a 54" Swordfish offshore fishing in Fort Lauderdale. Awesome day, great catch!

        Tight Lines!
        Captain David Ide
        Lady Pamela II Fishing Charters
        954-761-8045

        Comment


        • Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island Fishing Report

          Schooling Black Drum and Sheepshead

          Cool overnight temperatures continue to give anglers a good excuse to sleep in and start their fishing trip a little later. Air temperatures in the 40’s and early morning water temperatures in the low 60’s often make for a better afternoon bite. Fishing this week on the Banana River found both sheepshead and black drum schooling around the docks.

          The sheepsheads were receptive to frozen shrimp pinned to a ¼ ounce Rip Tide Pro Jighead. Rigging is easy. Pinch the tail off the shrimp and simply thread the shrimp onto the hook through where the tail was pinched off. Even though the sheepies were schooling between the docks, best results came when the shrimp tipped jighead was thrown in close to the dock pilings.

          Sightfishing the schools was a little different process. They were extremely spooky in the open water between the docks. Almost any presentation would cause them to bolt to deeper water. After switching over to a fly rod for a few casts I got a couple sheepies to follow, but they never would eat the fly.



          The black drums were willing to take frozen shrimp on a circle hook. In this case the shrimp was suspended below a popping cork and fished around the docks in the area where the schools were spotted. The drum were on the move up and down the shoreline. When they came back through the area they couldn’t resist the easy meal of the dangling shrimp. When attaching the popping cork use a leader (mono or fluorocarbon) appropriate to the water depth you are fishing and tie on a 3/0 circle hook with a uni-knot. Add another short piece of mono to your mainline if you are using braided line. Use a double uni-knot to add the leader. Now you can use a regular uni-knot again to attach the leader to the top side of the popping cork. When using braid the extra piece of mono makes a more secure connection on the wire of the cork.

          Using braid is a good idea when fishing around docks and other structure because of its abrasion resistant qualities. The black drum picture here wrapped around two different pilings before coming out into the open water. If the mainline had been mono he could have easily broken off.



          That's what it's all about. Good fishin'.

          Capt. Ron Presley

          Comment


          • Orlando Florida Report 12/11/08

            Although we are currently under a tornado watch as a strong cold front approaches central Florida, we have had some great weather during the past week.

            Last week, I fished three days with my friend and fellow guide Capt. John Kumiski. Capt. Tom Van Horn joined us on the third day. Wednesday, John and I piled on the layers and headed out to Mosquito Lagoon with morning temperatures in the 40's. I think the best position in the morning was on the poling platform where you can quickly warm up and John climbed up there first. I'm going to blame my errant casts on my frozen hands as I proceeded to spook several tailing redfish. We found some black drum which were more than willing to eat our small black flies.



            We took turns, each catching two drum before we moved on to look for something different. Redfish were spotted tailing here and there before we came upon numerous large trout basking in some shallow sand holes. Most of them spooked before we saw them but John got his black and purple bendback fly in front of one before it took off. The fish struck instantly and raced across the flat jumping and thrashing its head. The hook stayed put and we got a few pictures of the trophy sized trout before setting it free.





            I took my turn and cast my bendback to a sand hole containing three nice trout. An unseen redfish grabbed the fly before the trout saw it, not a bad problem to have. John landed a redfish to complete his slam. We finished the day catching a few more reds and seeing more big trout. A fun day on Mosquito Lagoon.

            The following day, I joined Capt. John for a kayak trip to the Banana River Lagoon. We paddled several miles with little to show for our efforts. I saw a few tailing redfish and stopped to cast to them while John continued on. By the time I was finished, I saw John
            about a mile ahead of me. I made my way up to him and immediately saw why he had stopped. There were tails in every direction. John told me he had released three redfish over twenty pounds and as I was climbing into the water, he hooked up again. As soon as I took out my
            camera, the hook pulled. I immediately grabbed my flyrod and was faced with some difficult decisions; which tail should I cast toward. Most of the tails I saw were from black drum but there were plenty of redfish mixed in. The black redfish worm fly worked well for both of
            us. We had a lot of bites and caught plenty. Perfect weather and great fishing. We were both so busy casting, neither of us too any photos.

            Friday, I joined up with Capt. Tom Van Horn in his canoe for another trip to the Banana River. Not just a canoe, this fishing machine is complete with a poling platform, casting deck, stabilizers from Kay-Noe paddle products, and rod holders. Capt. John went with us in his kayak. We returned to the spot where John and I had such great action the previous day.

            As soon as we arrived, I made two casts to a tailing redfish and was hooked up. My hopes of a record breaking day were quickly dashed as the tails from then on came few and far between. The highlight of the day was a big school of giant black drum and redfish finning near the surface. I made cast after cast with my fly with no takers.



            The problem was the fish were in deeper water and my fly was not getting to the bottom quickly enough. While I had heavier flies on board, they were not where I could get to them quickly. Not wanting to chance spooking the fish, I didn't change flies. Capt. John
            patiently watched and took photos from his kayak. When he could stand it no more, he tied on a weighted brown crab pattern and cast in front of the school. A huge redfish ate the fly but broke the 12 pound tippet a minute later. He tied on another fly and this time it was a
            monster black drum that bit. Now it was my turn to take pictures as the fish towed John off the flat.



            When he managed to get the over 30 pound fish under control, John realized he would be unable to lift it without tipping over.



            We decided to try and tow the fish back to the edge of the flat but the fish had other ideas. With a powerful surge of it's tail, it took off, straightening the #4 hook. The big school vanished and Tom and I went our own way finding a few tailing redfish here and there that were willing to play. Tom caught his fish with a DOA shrimp while I used flies and a DOA crab.



            Monday, I was back in Mosquito Lagoon. The water level had dropped significantly and I was curious to see where the fish had moved. The first few hours of the day revealed plenty of tailing redfish. Unfortunately, I could not convince them to eat any of three separate flies I tried. I picked up the DOA FiGi Chix shrimp and fired off a cast at the next tail I saw. The fish ate immediately. I checked various spots, seeing both redfish and big trout in all of them and catching a few more along the way.

            Tuesday, I had Rich and Dean on board for a full day of sight fishing the flats. Within minutes of arriving at our first spot, we saw a tail. For the next two hours, we saw tails quite regularly as well as running over many fish we did not see. For a short while, we had clear skies and no wind. Using 4 inch DOA CAL tails, Rich landed the first redfish and then
            Dean followed up with two in a row. Hoping to take advantage of the perfect conditions, I suggest we make a move to look for some bigger fish. On our way to the spot, the wind went from zero to fifteen in an instant. It never let up and brought with it numerous clouds which made sight fishing difficult. We hit several spots seeing fish at all but one. Unfortunately, many of the fish saw us before we saw them. Both guys caught a few redfish and trout and certainly had more fun than a day at the office.



            I will be off the water for the next ten days or so but I anticipate more great tailing fish action when I return.

            Capt. Chris Myers
            Central Florida Sight Fishing Charters
            http://www.floridafishinglessons.com

            Comment


            • Plaxico Burress of the New York Giants fishing - LP II

              December 6th, 2008

              On Saturday afternoon, Plaxico Burress (NY Giants Wide Reciever) and his buddies came fishing aboard the Lady Pamela II. They flew down from New York to get some South Florida sunshine right here in Fort Lauderdale. Live bait was a must this afternoon. We got a dozen goggle eyes and headed out front to pop the kites for the sailfish and mahi - mahi. The bite has been pretty consistent the past few days. However, fishing started off slow, not much was around. BUT Before we knew it, a sailfish ate the right short bait and started jumping. It put on a good fight and a great show....until he fell off. The bait went back out hoping for another bite. We didn't get a sailfish bite, but we did manage to catch a few blue runners and vermilion snappers for them to take home for dinner. We were losing daylight quickly and needed it for the type of fishing we wanted to do. They enjoyed themselves and went home with fresh fish.

              Tight Lines!
              Captain David Ide
              Lady Pamela II Fishing Charters
              954-761-8045

              Comment


              • South Indian River Fishing Report 12/12

                December 12, 2008

                INSHORE:

                With all the cold and flu that goes around this time of year.....I finally got hit and it decked me out all week. No fishing....just bed and rest to try and shake this bug. And I am not one who enjoys just laying around! The fishing has been pretty good out there and anglers are catching a variety of fish. With the latest cold front upon us, the winds will be blowing most days this week.

                Around the river, anglers are catching quite a few grouper while trolling along the channel edges north of Fort Pierce. Pompano fishing down around the power plant has remained consistent most days. The trout and redfish have continued to come in shallow as the sun warms up the water. We were finding them in one to three feet of water. Bridge anglers are still enjoying lots of sand perch, black drum and sheephead out on the catwalks. Ladyfish and jacks are everywhere! Mackerel, jacks and bluefish are around the inlet. I had some reports of snook catches, but most have been shorts of late with a few slots being taken. Remember......snook season CLOSES on December 15th and trout season won't re-open until January 1st.

                Tip of the Week: Windy Weather Fishing

                We can expect some windy days so plan your trips around the direction of the wind and enjoy your adventure. Setting up your drifts by using the wind directions can give you more fishing time and less time worrying about keeping the boat positioned. Drifting a flat in a zigzag pattern can allow you to cover a larger area while letting mother nature assist you. Fish ahead of your drift or to either side of the boat. If using live bait, I like to use popping corks and fish them ahead and re-cast as you drift up on them. You can use a drift anchor to slow down or use a small mushroom anchor like I do. I drop the anchor and fish an area. After some casts, I lift the anchor and drift ahead a little and drop it again. When you start catching fish, just keep the anchor out and fish that area longer. Once you are finished with a drift, move back across the flat at an angle to give your next drift in waters that you have yet to fish. It's an easy way to fish in windy conditions. Let the wind be your friend!

                As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                Captain Charlie Conner
                www.fishtalescharter.com

                email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                772-284-3852

                Clint Walker and myself with a couple recent trout catches on the Indian River flats...


                Comment


                • SW FL-Bonita Beach: Weather Tricky but Fishing Good

                  Another weather-front came through the area Sunday night, once again kicking up winds and seas. But, despite some choppy conditions, the fishing was good offshore Tuesday morning. I fished with Bill Story, Marvin Giescke and friends, Doc, Dave and Bernie, in 45 feet out of New Pass, using live shrimp. We caught twenty keeper mangrove snapper to 15 inches, five huge whitebone porgies to 18 inches, a 22 inch white margate and keeper triggerfish and porkfish. We released smaller triggerfish and lots of gags that were within ¼ inch of legal-size.

                  William Conklin, Dennis Baker and friends fished in 47 feet out of New Pass with me Wednesday. Winds were howling most of the day, but the worst of the next weather-front wasn’t on us yet. We had three to four foot seas most of the day. We did well with snapper again, catching nine keepers to 16 inches and releasing lots of smaller ones. We also caught a 20 inch pompano, a 14 inch hogfish, a couple keeper triggerfish, and also got into those big whitebone porgies again, catching eight of those to 17 inches. We used shrimp for all.

                  Thursday brought a new cold-front to the area, which was accompanied by steady rain and high winds. My planned inshore trip was rained out. The winds and rough seas persisted into Friday, and predictions for Saturday were somewhat better but still pretty rough offshore. I was concerned because I was scheduled to take a family fishing in the Gulf Saturday but, before the weather could officially cancel those plans, my clients called to say they were battling the flu and not coming down to visit this weekend. They were disappointed but I assured them that the weather would be far from ideal Saturday anyway—I hope that made them feel a little bit better. So, as it turns out, my four-trip week was reduced to two trips—I guess Mother Nature thought I needed a vacation.

                  The photo shown below is of angler Lynn Harned with a 17 inch mutton snapper, caught on a live shrimp on a recent offshore Fishbuster Charter.
                  Captain Dave Hanson
                  Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                  Bonita Beach, FL
                  239 947-1688
                  fishbuster@comcast.net
                  http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                  Comment


                  • South Indian River Fishing Report 12/18

                    December 18, 2008

                    INSHORE:

                    Finally! After a couple weeks of battling the flu, I was able to get back on the water and do some scouting around the river. It turned out to be a wonderful weather day with light winds to make it a warm welcome back to the river. It looks like the weekend will be a fantastic opportunity to get out fishing. The fish are out there, so plan a trip out soon!

                    If you have children, it's one of the best times of year to take them fishing. The ladyfish and jacks are thick on the edges of the flats and you can treat them to an experience that they will remember for a long time. Tom Hull came down from Melbourne and we play with them for a while to get back into the fishing mode again. Try to get some kids out there soon and show them a good time!

                    There are still large trout, snook and redfish hanging just on the flat edges once the sun warms up the morning. We found some nice size trout to hit and did manage one redfish before the day ended. It sure was nice to get back on the water again. If you are out, try soft plastics like DOA CAL jerk baits or grub tails for the trout, snook and redfish. We caught trout on the jerk baits and the redfish on a grub tail. Suspending lures will also work along with top water in the early mornings. Harbor Branch, Round Island and Bear Point have all been good areas to fish.

                    The sand perch bite slowed down a little this week, but you can still find some along with black drum, snapper and sheephead. I have seen some big sheephead around the river on the flats as well. There are still mackerel, bluefish and jacks around the inlet and jetties to catch. The pompano bite has been mostly around the power plant area. The surf has found whiting and pompano for anglers along the beach.

                    Tip of the Week:

                    Most of the big fish we have caught or seen on the flats have been hanging in the sand holes. I love to fish any sandy areas on the grass flats. Most sand holes that you happen on will usually be a bit deeper than the grass around them. Big fish are typically lazy and will hang in these holes to wait for bait fish to drift over with the tides. I cast just beyond a sandy area and fish slowly along it. Once the sun comes up, it easy to spot these areas on the flats and might just help you be a little more successful.

                    As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                    Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                    Captain Charlie Conner
                    www.fishtalescharter.com

                    email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                    772-284-3852
                    A couple trout from this weeks fishing....


                    Comment


                    • South Indian River Fishing Report 12/23

                      December 23, 2008

                      INSHORE:

                      This year has come and gone so fast and I would like to thank everyone for making 2008 full of great memories and fun adventures on the water. We hope that you and your family has the most wonder of Holiday Seasons and wish you the very best for 2009!

                      Some great fishing weather awaited anglers this past week on the Indian River. Mild temperatures and very little winds to allow boats to spread throughout the river and ocean in search of their favorite species of fish. It was unusual to have so many great fishing days without another cold front to stir things up again. Even the fish were enjoying the weather and we found them hungry as well.

                      Big sheephead are around the river now. Each day we caught lots of three to five pound sheephead around docks and structure along the Indian River. Kevin and Gordon had some non-stop action and the next day Jack, Bill and Steve enjoyed the same fun and even caught some snook and grouper as well. Dave and Cody Howard were next to wrestle some of these big sheephead from under the docks. Young Cody mastered it well and also found a variety of fish to keep his rod bending. We had lots of fun this week on the water!

                      Trout have been holding in three to five feet on the grass flats. We had a number of trout along with all the jacks and ladyfish you cared to tangle with. The youngsters were all smiles this week with the quick and seemingly unending action. There were some redfish caught around some of the docks this week. You can also find some hanging in the shallows under the warmth of the sun. All our fish this week were caught on DOA CAL jerk baits or live shrimp on a DOA jig head. There is some fast furious action awaiting you out there on the river!

                      Black drum, sand perch and sheephead topped the list on the catwalks and bridges this week. Live or dead shrimp works great for these areas. Pompano around the Power Plant and in the surf has been the catch for those anglers. The jetties continue to hold Spanish mackerel, bluefish and jacks for those with a silver spoon. It's been a fantastic week on the water!

                      Tip of the Week: It's almost the end of 2008 and many will soon be thinking of resolutions for the coming year. While my usual ones are always to lose weight and keep healthy, I will set a few as well for the water.....

                      1. Protect our grass flats. Idle speed in the shallows and use a trolling motor or push pole the majority of the time. Prop scars can take years to heal if at all.

                      2. Pick up some kind of trash from the water on each adventure. There is always something floating around in the river and picking up something can only help in keeping our river cleaner.

                      3. Teach as many of our youth the art of fishing. Etiquette, casting skills, safe boating and using artificials are only a few of the many things that we can teach our future anglers.

                      4. Practice catch and release. Safe handling and releasing of fish can help insure a population for generations to come.

                      5. It's all about having fun! Enjoy your time on the water and make it enjoyable for everyone around you.

                      As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                      Merry Christmas and Happy New Year,
                      Captain Charlie Conner
                      www.fishtalescharter.com

                      email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                      772-284-3852


                      Cody Howard was busy reeling in fish this week with his dad, Dave. Jack and his sister had big days while fishing with their family, the Murrays.





                      Comment


                      • SW FL-Bonita Beach: Offshore & Inshore Recent Catch Rep

                        Monday, 12/15, on a cloudy morning in Estero Bay, I dodged a few rain sprinkles and fished with H.O. Brownback and Steve Aggunt. We did pretty well using live shrimp and caught five keeper-sheepshead to 16 inches and four keeper-mangrove snapper. We released smaller fish of both varieties.

                        The rest of the week was pretty slow, as is typical in the lull before the holiday rush. I fished Estero Bay again on Saturday, 12/20, with Robert Haller, his wife, and his parents. We used shrimp to catch two keeper sheepshead to 15 inches, six keeper mangrove snapper, a 15 inch keeper black drum and a 14 inch keeper pompano. We released a trout, which is currently out of season.

                        Monday, winds whipped in advance of a cold-front, but that didn’t bother us much fishing in lower Estero Bay. Bill Darkoch and his son, Justin, wanted to learn to fish the bay and scheduled a day of catch-and-release fishing. We used shrimp and released thirty sheepshead to 15 inches, twenty mangrove snapper, ladyfish and cravalle jack.

                        With a small craft advisory in effect through Tuesday morning, I called my Tuesday anglers Monday night to let them know it would be rough offshore. But this hardy group of six from IL weren’t about to give up on their fishing plans. So I suggested we try the near-shore reefs, where seas would at least be tolerable. Paul & Celeste Luctenberg, son John, daughter Lindsay, and Bobby & Janet Cordoba withstood three to four foot seas even at the reefs all morning. But we had a good time using live shrimp to catch eighteen keeper mangrove snapper, all eleven and twelve inches, three twelve-inch lane snapper, and keeper triggerfish. We released lots of gag grouper shorts to 19 inches.

                        Wednesday, Christmas Eve, I fished near-shore again, with winds still blowing pretty strong. Marshall and Connie Swain, their daughter Laura, and Laura’s fiancé, Ryan Shick, had a good time at the reefs catching snapper. We caught a dozen keeper lane snapper, eight keeper mangrove snapper to 12 inches, and a keeper triggerfish. We released gag grouper shorts to 21 inches (an inch less than legal-size) along with two goliath grouper estimated at 12 pounds and 17 pounds.

                        December 25th and 26th were reserved for family events and, when I got back to fishing on Saturday, 12/27, winds were feisty once again. The bay was very shallow and not a very good option, so Jerry Spetzler and son, Andy, fished with me at the near-shore reefs, where the bite was finicky all morning. We caught mostly throw-backs, which included gag grouper shorts to 21 inches and small sheepshead and triggerfish. We managed a couple of keeper mangrove snapper and a couple of grunts.

                        By the time I update this fishing report next weekend, I will be changing the dates to ’09 so happy New Year to all, in advance.

                        The photo shown below is of angler Marvin Griescke with a 22 inch white margate, caught on a live shrimp on a recent offshore Fishbuster Charter
                        Captain Dave Hanson
                        Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                        Bonita Beach, FL
                        239 947-1688
                        fishbuster@comcast.net
                        http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                        Comment


                        • Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island Fishing Report

                          Foggy Morning on the Banana River

                          With all the holiday activities I had not been on the water for a week and was anxious to see what was cookin’. I took my time getting started because of the heavy fog I saw outside my window. As it began to lift a little I hooked up the Maverick and headed for the dock. I was greeted by a foggy morning as I unloaded a Kiwanis Park on Merritt Island and headed south on Newfound Harbor.

                          With the wind light out of the west I decide to return to the docks on the west banks of the Banana River. Before Christmas lots of sheepshead (I’m still trying to catch one on fly), black drum and scattered redfish were present under and between the docks.

                          My first stop was an area that includes an oyster bar and usually has sheepies all over it this time of year. Not today though, so I started south scanning the bank for signs of fish. I found an occasional sheepshead, or maybe two at a time. They were all spooky and did not hang around to play.

                          One area has a long distance between docks and is characterized by a very sandy and shallow shoreline. About half-way down this section of shore I spotted a couple really nice spotted sea trout. I made several casts with a black fly, but no one was interested. This area, which probably warmed up much quicker than some of the other areas, was populated with at least a dozen nice trout and the only mullet I had seen all morning.

                          I continued my search in a southerly direction. Along the way there were a few redfish singles, more trout, more sheepshead, one juvenile tarpon (I bet there were some more around somewhere), and two really nice snook. I set a way point in my head for the dock that held the snook with the idea of coming back at lunch time.

                          The rest of the morning was more of the same as I continued fishing with fly rod only. As lunch time approached I headed back to the dock where I saw the monster snook earlier. The wind had switched around to the southeast, so I positioned the boat where I could float a popping cork back under the dock while I ate my lunch. I had brought some frozen shrimp along just for such an occasion.

                          I cast out about a foot under the dock and fed out more line so the float would continue back under the dock. With the bail open I laid the rod down and began to eat my sandwich. I guess I was paying too much attention to eating and not enough to fishing. I heard a loud splash only to look up and see a fish and my bobber airborne on the opposite side of the dock.

                          I quickly laid down my sandwich and reached for the rod, but it was too late! Not much to do but bait up again the send the bobber back under the dock. This time I ate with one hand and held the rod with the other. Almost as suddenly as before the bobber was gone and I began to reel expecting the circle hook to do its job. The hook did its job, but the leader did not. I have to think it had a nick in it or something, because when the line came tight it snapped under the weight of the fish.
                          I was zero for two and that was the last chance I had that day. Some days you just have to be satisfied with enjoying the beauty of God’s great outdoors.



                          That's what it's all about. Good fishin'.

                          Capt. Ron Presley

                          Comment


                          • Ending The 2008 Fishing Season Offshore Fort Lauderdale

                            Ending The 2008 Fishing Season Offshore Fort Lauderdale - Bring it on 2009!


                            The Winter season is definitely making it's presence felt here in South Florida with cold fronts pushing through one after another. We do prefer our 80 degree afternoons, but these chilly spurts bring more than just the shivers to us Fort Lauderdale locals, it's the start of our red hot winter fishing season. In November, we had the best sailfish bite I've seen in years. Kite Fishing is key when it comes to catching a sailfish. Live goggleeyes dangling from the kites really seems to turn them on. With moderate winds coming from the North and the East, we were averaging 5 - 15 sailfish a day. It has slowed down a bit, but not much. Watching those sailfish jump 5 feet high, 5 times in a row is the ultimate adrenalin rush. They are one of the most sought after game fish in the world and one of my favorite fish to seek. Tournament fishing is now in full swing here in South Florida. November 11 - 12 was the Sailfish Cup, the first leg of the Sailfish Pro Series. My tournament fishing team and I (Advanced Roofing) caught 20 sailfish in two days, hopefully the bite stays consistent and every boat catches fish throughout the season.

                            Just a few miles off the coast of Fort Lauderdale, more and more kingfish are being caught on the troll. Several days this month you couldn't get away from the kings. Some mahi - mahi remain, but are thinning out and migrating to warmer waters. Fort Lauderdale is known for it's wreck fishing offshore. If you are looking for something to tug on this time of year, drop a live bait on their front door and your chances of catching a grouper or a nice size amberjack are likely. The game sharks have been seen here and there, but not many takers.

                            As we approach the end of December, the new year brings several different attractions to South Florida. There are so many things to see and do, but nothing compares to deep sea fishing offshore - take advantage of our backyard and bring home a memorable experience. Fort Lauderdale and Miami offer some of the worlds best sportfishing. Head down here a day early or extend your vacation a day late to go deep sea fishing in Fort Lauderdale and experience the thrill of a lifetime.


                            Tight Lines & Happy New Year!

                            Captain David Ide
                            www.ladypamela2.com
                            954-761-8045

                            Comment


                            • Orlando Florida Report 1/1/09

                              The first day of the new year has brought with it some high winds and cool temperatures. My clients for today decided to cancel and try again tomorrow giving me a chance to catch up on some work at home.

                              Water levels in the Mosquito Lagoon are lower than they have been all of last year. The warm temperatures as of late have kept the water from the mid 60's to over 70 on most days. This spell of warmer weather has seemed to push many of the large trout off the shallow flats though we have still seen some each day. As soon as the cooler weather returns, look for the trophy trout to reappear.

                              Redfish are in their winter schooling mode which means there are not as many single fish roaming the flats. Casting at schools increase your chances at a hookup but if you cannot find the schools, you may cover a lot of water and see very few fish. Again, since the water
                              has warmed up, the redfish have not been tailing nearly as well as they were at the beginning of last month. Just because you do not see them tailing does not mean they will not eat a well placed bait or fly.

                              A couple weeks ago, my wife and I spent several days in the mountains of north Georgia. We took a trip with a guide on the Soquee River to do some fly fishing for rainbow trout, a first for both of us. We landed 8 nice fish and lost many more.



                              On the 23rd, Dan, a local resident, wanted to show his guest from Louisiana the Mosquito Lagoon. Unfortunately, the winds blew over 20 the entire day and fishing was tough. We saw very few fish and only caught a couple trout.

                              On Christmas Eve, I was joined by a father and son team from Alabama. We had great weather throughout the morning. Our first spot produced tons of tailing redfish and a few black drum. They did not get a lure in front of the fish but had fun trying. Our next few spots all held schools of redfish and John was able to hook up with his first redfish.



                              My wife and I made a trip to Mosquito Lagoon this Monday. I used a black crab fly to hook up with a black drum right after Julie landed one on a spinning rod. We checked several spots I had not visited in a while and only found scattered reds and trout. I got two reds on a DOA
                              shrimp and another on a bendback fly. After much searching, we found an area holding numerous large seatrout. While we saw some much bigger than we caught, I was able to complete the slam on fly and a couple more came on DOA CAL's.



                              Tuesday, Jim and his wife Sandra enjoyed a beautiful Florida winter day on Mosquito Lagoon. We started the day fishing a school of black drum. Sandra brought the first fish of the day to the boat.



                              Jim hooked up a few minutes later and followed with a second drum after that. The flat became crowded with boats so we moved on in search of other fish.We found an area holding multiple schools of redfish. Jim caught a couple reds but the schools were spooky and tough to keep up with. We made a move and Sandra landed two redfish of her own. Seeking to complete the slam, we went searching for trout. Sandra used a DOA Deadly Combo to catch a few trout before we called it a day.

                              Wednesday, it was significantly cooler as I headed out with the brother and sister team of Jim and Juanita. A few minutes after we started fishing, Jim landed a black drum. Juanita soon had one on but the hook pulled. We went in search of redfish and had a tough time
                              finding some as the wind began to increase. Both Jim and Juanita caught a redfish before the school vanished.



                              With the high winds, we elected to try fishing some deeper water for trout. Using a Deadly Combo as well as 3 inch CAL tails, they caught and released about 15-20 trout.The holiday crowds will be gone in a few days and the fish should get a chance to settle down a bit. The
                              water will cool soon and the redfish and drum will happily tailing on the flats.



                              Capt. Chris Myers
                              Central Florida Sight Fishing Charters
                              Cocoa Beach Fishing Guide
                              Last edited by capt_chris_m; 12-29-2009, 08:03 AM.

                              Comment


                              • 20th Over-the-Hill Sailfish Tournament is Fun for 50 &

                                FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                                20th Over-the-Hill Sailfish Tournament is Fun for 50 & over
                                Historic “seniors” charity tournament for CF and MARC set for Jan. 19 & 20th

                                ISLAMORADA In-the-Florida Keys --- Fishing fun and feeling philanthropic in the Florida Keys at Flutie’s Fifty and over tournament.
                                Okay, please excuse the alliteration but its worth emphasizing that two decades ago the late Capt. Al Flutie and friends started a little local charity sailfishing tournament that today continues to embody the fun of the sport and the uniqueness of the Florida Keys community.
                                Flutie, a popular Islamorada guide and radio fishing show host along with Dick Sheppard, Socko Gorenflo and Rip Tosun began the originally named Al Flutie Over-the-Hill Rip-Off Sailfish Tournament, which 20 years later is still the only senior’s sailfish tournament in the world.
                                This year the historic seniors’ catch-and-release competition kicks off Monday afternoon, Jan. 19 at Gary Dunn’s Ocean View Inn (MM 84.5 bayside), with fishing, dinner and awards on Jan. 20.
                                The event has far-reaching appeal attracting not only locals but many anglers from northern states. Last year’s top place winners were from New Jersey and Minnesota. It’s also attracted the attention of the world’s largest advocacy organization for the 50+ community in an AARP newsletter.
                                Anyone can participate but only those 50 years and older are eligible for trophies and prizes.
                                Asked why the tournament has enjoyed such enormous popularity, veteran tournament official Capt. Bill Kelly laughed saying, “The tournament’s motto is ‘we give tacky a touch of class.’ We do it benefiting very worthy causes such as cystic fibrosis research through the Redbone celebrity tournaments here in Islamorada and MARC the Monroe Association for ReMARCable Citizens of the Keys. We keep the entry fee affordable, make certain the food is top-notch, provide outstanding trophies by well-known marine artist Pasta Pantaleo and have high quality items in both the live and silent auctions. We throw in lots of fun and camaraderie and just hope the fishing is up to par. Even if the fishing is slow we have all the ingredients for a highly successful event.”
                                Over the holidays the latest reports were the sailfish action was strong in the Atlantic waters.

                                Donating over $350.000 to local and national charities with zero administrative costs
                                Kelly said tournament originators are extremely proud of their event’s history of profits for charities. With zero administrative dollars paid out of the profits more than $350,000 has been donated to numerous charities
                                “Because it’s an all volunteer effort there’s no administrative fees taken from tournament proceeds. Other than covering operating expenses, every penny raised goes to the charities.
                                "It’s heart-warming knowing we’re helping to make a difference,” said Kelly. “The life span for those afflicted with CF has tripled and grows each and every day. Scientists are on the cusp to finding a cure for this disease and that's part of our mission. Also helping to preserve the valuable work of MARC of the Keys is fundamental to our community character. Keys residents have always stepped up to the plate when locals need help and support. That's what it's all about."
                                “Dunn, the former Pittsburgh Steeler great opens his O V Inn and Sports Pub and all of our volunteers treat our anglers like royalty. I think that's why our anglers dig deep in their pockets to help raise money for our selected charities. Besides, this tournament is just plain fun to fish in!
                                “It’s too bad Al, Dick and Socko are no longer with us to appreciate all of the goodness they helped generate for Keys infrastructure and such noble causes. Somehow I feel they know it and continue to shower their blessings on all of us.”
                                More tournament information and downloadable entry forms are on the MARC website at: www.marchouse.org. Or participants can call co-chairmen Michelle Snyder at 305-852-3282 or at 305-849-3042, or Gordon Ross at 305-294-9526 ext. 25 gordonkw1552@aim.com.
                                ###

                                Jan 2, 2009 Pete Johnson, Johnson Communications, Scottsdale, Ariz., USA
                                480-951-3654 (ph) -- JohnsonCom@aol.com
                                Saltwater Fishing Articles & More by Outdoor Writer Jerry LaBella
                                http://www.jerrylabella.com/forums
                                http://jerrylabella.com

                                Comment


                                • SW FL-Bonita Beach: Good Start to a New Year of Fishing

                                  Monday, 12/29, I fished in 44 feet off Naples with Tom Wolf and sons, Jordan and Patrick, and friend, Chris Coriddi. Using live shrimp, Tom caught a nice 23 inch keeper red grouper (see photo.) We released lots of gag and red grouper shorts, which provided steady action for us all morning. We also caught seven keeper snapper, including six mangs and one lane. We released lots of smaller mangs and a short mutton snapper. We also caught a nice whitebone porgie and a 25 inch king mackerel, which was the only keeper mackerel out of the three we landed.

                                  Tuesday, I headed out New Pass to 47 feet with Sven and Corinna Petersen. We caught a keeper gag grouper at 24 inches and released about thirty more gag and red grouper that were just short of keeper-size. We also caught about 100 mangrove snapper but only two of those were keepers at 14 inches so we released the rest of them, along with grunts and a 30 pound goliath grouper. We also caught four 15 inch whitebone porgies, all on live shrimp.

                                  Caitlin Froehlich, her dad, Toby, and her brother, Sam, fished with me Wednesday morning in 44 feet off Naples. We caught whitebone porgies to 15 inches and kept a half dozen of those, along with a 14 inch triggerfish, and a 16 inch yellowtail snapper. We released five king mackerel to 26 inches, gag grouper shorts, and a 30 pound goliath grouper.

                                  New Year’s Day I was off the water for family happenings, but Friday, January 2nd found me fishing with Bob Sawyer, Don Stevenson and Katie Grote in 46 feet out of New Pass, where the winds and seas were kicked up once again but the fishing was good. We used shrimp to catch a mess of mangrove snapper and kept the largest eight of those, which were 15 and 16 inches. We also caught some large whitebone porgies and released lots of smaller snapper, grouper shorts, triggerfish and king mackerel.

                                  I had planned to fish inshore in Estero Bay on Saturday with a nice couple but, unfortunately, the Mrs. came down with a stomach virus overnight Friday and they were forced to cancel at the last minute on Saturday morning. So I spent Saturday doing some maintenance. Weather-permitting, I will have a full week of fishing beginning Monday with lots to report next week.

                                  The photo shown is of angler Tom Wolf with a 23 inch red grouper, caught on a live shrimp on an offshore Fishbuster Charter 12/29/08.
                                  Captain Dave Hanson
                                  Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                  Bonita Beach, FL
                                  239 947-1688
                                  fishbuster@comcast.net
                                  http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                                  Comment


                                  • South Indian River January Forecast

                                    INSHORE:

                                    January will be full of sunny days and windy conditions for most of the month. We can expect a few days a week to enjoy and the rest can be a challenge to get out on the water. Offshore is usually choppy to rough seas, but will hold some great sailfishing for those who can get out on the ocean. We will be playing cat and mouse with the wind, but there is always somewhere on the river to enjoy a day of fishing.

                                    Trout season re-opens and many anglers will be out with their popping corks on the grass flats. Pompano will also be cruising around the river & surf and you never know where or when you can pick up some of these great tasting fish. The grouper bite along the channel will still be good as will be the dock fishing for them. Jetties will hold lots of bluefish, mackerel and jacks, while the catwalks provide sheephead, black drum and croakers for eager anglers.

                                    January is a great month to fish the Indian River along the Treasure Coast if you watch the weather and plan your trips around the weekly cold fronts that will invade the area. Have fun this year and have a fantastic 2009!

                                    Tip of the Week:
                                    As winter settles in on the Treasure Coast, windy conditions will be the norm on most days for the next several months. Small boats that cruise the river in search of a good fishing spot can be especially vulnerable to water blown around in the boat from choppy waves and blustery winds. Make sure cell phones, keys, cameras or any things that could be damaged by salt water are stowed secure and dry from the conditions. Dry boxes or zip lock bags can save a cell phone or car keys from sure disaster from the effects of saltwater. Keep them safe and dry before you leave the dock!

                                    As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                                    Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                                    Captain Charlie Conner

                                    www.fishtalescharter.com
                                    email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com
                                    772-284-3852

                                    Comment


                                    • SW FL-Bonita Beach: 28 Inch Gag Best Catch & Big Snappe

                                      Monday, 1/5/09, I fished offshore in 43 feet, to the north of New Pass with Alene Haug, Scott Kempfort, Loren Heintze and John Reardon. The snapper bite was hot all morning and we caught twenty-two of those to 19 inches, none of them smaller than 14 inches. We also caught a big whitebone porgie and a 14 inch hogfish. We were cut off twice by big king mackerel and we released some smaller mackerel, triggerfish, gag grouper to 21 inches and red grouper shorts.

                                      Tuesday, seas began building mid-morning, in advance of a weather-front coming through, and we had 3-4 foot seas twenty miles out of New Pass, where I fished with Bill and Mike Evans. The somewhat rough seas were worth enduring, though—we were rewarded with a 28 inch gag grouper, caught on shrimp. That catch was a team effort, with Bill hooking it and Mike on the net. We also caught thirteen keeper mangrove snapper to 16 inches and a large whitebone porgie. We released lots of smaller snapper, red and gag grouper shorts, small king mackerel and triggerfish.

                                      Wednesday was a blustery, rainy day and I had to cancel my fishing plans. I had hoped for good conditions Thursday but, even though the sun was shining and the seas decreased to about 2-3 feet, those seas happened to be on top of a four-foot swell left over from the high seas of the previous day and night. I did not think my anglers would appreciate those conditions so I also cancelled Thursday’s trip.

                                      Friday, I fished is somewhat sloppy conditions, but better than they had been for a couple of days. Vince Tomlinson and friend, John, fished with me in 44 feet out of New Pass, where we caught ten keeper mangrove snapper to 16 inches and a keeper hogfish. We released lots of smaller mangs, porgies, triggerfish, bluefish and grouper shorts. We missed boating the biggest mangrove snapper when a shark bit it in half before we could reel it in—that one’s head measured about 8 inches so he was a pretty big fish.

                                      Ron Musick, Dick Arnett and friends fished with me Saturday in 44 feet out of New Pass, where the snapper bite was still on pretty strong. We caught twenty nice mangs to 18 inches and a half dozen whitebone porgies, all about 14 inches, on live shrimp. We let smaller mangs and porgies go, along with grouper shorts, grunts, a small hogfish and a few small king mackerel.

                                      The photo shown is of angler Sven Petersen with a 24 inch gag grouper, caught on a live shrimp on an offshore Fishbuster Charter 12/30/08.
                                      Captain Dave Hanson
                                      Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                      Bonita Beach, FL
                                      239 947-1688
                                      fishbuster@comcast.net
                                      http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                                      Comment


                                      • South Indian River Fishing Report 1/10

                                        January 10, 2009

                                        INSHORE:

                                        Well, here we go beginning another new year and looking forward to exciting adventures on the water. We have already had some great days out there in spite of windy conditions a lot of the time. The fish are feeding on the flats and you can find an assortment of species around the Indian River this month. We have had lots of fun out there recently.

                                        I had several friends return to fish the Indian River. Robert Strang and Denise were down and Denise topped off her day with a 26" snook. Keith Mullins and Kai were down to enjoy the nice weather again. Adrian and Phil Lusardi were out again with me and we had some wonderful fishing on one of those very windy days. Mark Platt, Bill Massan & John Wayman were some of the new clients that I had the privilege to have on the boat.

                                        The bite for redfish, snook and trout has continued to improve around the river, with some big gator trout being taken in the shallow grass flats. Our best day was with Adrian and Phil Lusardi as they caught six reds and a number of snook and trout. Almost all of our fish continue to be caught on artificials. DOA CAL jerk baits and grub tails are my favorites out there on the flats. Rootbeer is always a sure fire color to use during the winter months. These fish are all feeding in the same areas, so you can find yourself with an inshore slam on any given day. Fish slowly and keep a stealthy approach in the shallows to improve your success rate.

                                        Bridges continue to produce sheephead, black drum, sand perch and snapper on live or dead shrimp. Lots of mackerel, jacks and bluefish are around the inlets, while whiting and pompano are the best catches along the surf. You can usually find jacks and bluefish also feeding along the beaches. Channel edges along the river has held a good grouper bite as well as mackerel and snapper. And the usual ladyfish and jacks are wreaking havoc all over the river!

                                        Tip of the Week:

                                        Wind is the norm around the Treasure Coast during winter and spring. You can expect lots of it and plan your adventures around each front. It's also a good time to use the wind to get some much needed things accomplished that is hard to do most of the year. Here are just a few little chores that can be done when the winds are blowing and you have that itch to go fishing!

                                        1. Cleaning out that tackle bag or box. You just never know what might be down in the bottom of it!

                                        2. Changing that old line on your reels and making sure all your reels and rods are in good working order.

                                        3. Checking safety equipment on the boat. Flares and fire extinguishers all have expirations that need to be checked at least once a year to comply with Coast Guard regs.

                                        There are many little things that you can just take a few minutes and check out so that your next trip on the water will be safe, fun and exciting. Checking lights on the boat and trailer change spark plugs or water separators, inspect battery connections, tighten the screws around the deck of the boat and many more small chores that take little time. Have a fun and safe 2009!

                                        As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                                        Good Fishing and be Safe,
                                        Captain Charlie Conner
                                        http://www.fishtalescharter.com

                                        email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                                        772-284-3852

                                        Denise with a nice snook, Mark battling another fish, Adrian & Phil with a few of their catches this week on the Indian River....




                                        Comment


                                        • 25TH IGFA Auction & Banquet

                                          Online bidding ends Jan. 19 for
                                          huge 25TH IGFA Auction & Banquet
                                          In past years an estimated 20 – 25% of online bids were the final winners

                                          DANIA BEACH, Fla., USA -- You don’t have to be there to win one of the great items up for bid in the International Game Fish Association’s annual auction. The online bidding for the 25th Anniversary IGFA Auction & Banquet is now underway on the IGFA web site at www.igfa.org.
                                          But the online portion closes Monday, January 19th at 9 a.m. ET
                                          The active global-wide online bidding, now in its sixth year, builds advance awareness for the IGFA’s “Silver Anniversary” event at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida on January 23, 2009. The gala evening is black tie optional and the funds raised are used for numerous conservation efforts by the IGFA across the globe.
                                          Those bids from the online auction will be the starting bids at both the live and silent auctions on the 23rd. The night begins at 6 pm with cocktails and the silent auction. At 7:30 the silent auction closes and the IGFA Conservation Awards, dinner and live auction will begin.
                                          “It’s worth checking the IGFA web site before it closes because there are always some great bargains,” said Lesley Arico, IGFA corporate relations manager. “Historically 20 – 25% of the online bids are the final winners.”
                                          All online winners will be notified on Monday, January 26th

                                          Long list of items up for bid
                                          Two new fully-rigged boats from Hell’s Bay Boatworks and Mako Marine are the featured items this year.
                                          The Hell’s Bay 18’ Marquesa flats skiff package was donated by Capt. Chris and Wendi Peterson. This shallow-water performance boat comes equipped with a 90 hp electric-start Mercury Outboard, solid aluminum custom trailer, Odyssey battery, fully carpeted sides and rod racks, anodized poling platform, Lenco electric trim tabs and many more features and attributes. The Mako 204 center console offshore fishing package was donated by Johnny Morris of Bass Pro Shops and Mako Boats. Its long list of features includes a Mercury 200 OptiMax engine, an aluminum trailer with tandem axle and tandem axle brakes, T-top, 37-gal. frontseat baitwell, two above deck fishboxes with overboard drain and much more.
                                          Among the other items featured in the live auction are:
                                          An original by Guy Harvey, this year’s featured artist and his titled work “Blue Sky”
                                          A sportfishing trip for four in San Salvador, Bahamas with Hadenuff Charters
                                          one week at Tomato Paste in Abaco, Bahamas donated by Phil “Boot”LeBoutillier
                                          the ultimate fishing vacation for four at the home of Don Tyson in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.
                                          “Fishing Legends” package with legendary Hall of Famer Stu Apte
                                          South African safari for two with Sitatunga Safaris
                                          Guatemala fishing with Pacific Fins Resort
                                          An original swordfish mount from Ray Douglas of King Sailfish Mounts
                                          A bass fishing/quail hunting trip for two on Lake Guerrero, Mexico with Hacienda Las Palmas
                                          A team entry to the 50th Anniversary of the Hawaiian International Billfish Tournament
                                          Ultimate week-long cruise for two in NW Australia aboard the Kimberly Quest II

                                          The over 200 live and silent auction items also include a long list of fine paintings, exquisite sculptures, rods and reels, tackle, jewelry, international resorts and lodges, fishing charters and much more.*
                                          * * Tickets are $175 per person or a corporate table for 10 people can be purchased for $5000 which includes preferred table placement, a full-page ad in the auction program, table signage and table favors.
                                          “All guests will receive a signed and numbered limited edition print of Guy Harvey’s original piece, ‘Blue Sky,’” said Arico.
                                          For reservations, for further information or if you would like to purchase Go for the Gold tickets where the winner receives $10,000 and the Junior Angler program receives the other $10,000, please contact Ms. Arico at 954-924-4222 or email larico@igfa.org
                                          ###

                                          1/13/2009 IGFA PR counsel - Pete Johnson, Johnson Communications,
                                          Scottsdale, Ariz., USA
                                          480-951-3654 (ph) -- JohnsonCom@aol.com
                                          Saltwater Fishing Articles & More by Outdoor Writer Jerry LaBella
                                          http://www.jerrylabella.com/forums
                                          http://jerrylabella.com

                                          Comment

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