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  • Saturday morning, 3/26/16, I fished 23 miles west of New Pass in calm seas with Bob Bockhorst, his son-in-law, Don Leesman, and Don’s college-aged kids, Dave, Kevin, and Kristen. Dave used a pinfish to reel in a 31-inch gag grouper—it was a beauty, but had to be released after we took its picture, due to closed season. Kristen caught a keeper 23-inch red grouper, though, which also bit a pinfish. The family used live shrimp to add a dozen keeper lane snapper, a brace of 22-inch Spanish mackerel, a 13-inch porgy, and a few grunts to the fish box. They released twenty-some red grouper shorts, and lots of yellowtail snapper shorts, and enjoyed one heck of a battle with an 8-foot sandbar shark before releasing it.

    Monday, 3/28, I headed offshore with Roy Mittman and his son, Zack, to fish with live shrimp 22 miles west of New Pass. The guys caught lots of red grouper, including one keeper at 22 inches. They also caught twenty keeper lane snapper to 12 inches, so they ended up with a pretty full fish box. Visibility was poor all day, with heavy clouds hanging over us, but no rain.

    Ron Musick, friend Dick Arnett, Dick’s son, Nate, and Nate’s four young sons, Will, Jack, Henry and Ted, fished 20 miles west of New Pass with me, ahead of the rains on Tuesday, 3/29. The boys caught a nice variety of fish on live shrimp, including two keeper red grouper at 21 and 22 inches, twenty lane snapper to 12 inches, a brace of keeper 13-inch mangrove snapper, three porkfish, seven porgies, eight grunts, and a brace of 24-inch Spanish mackerel. They released short red and gag grouper.

    Wednesday, 3/30, NOAA predicted calm seas of one-to two feet. But there was a stiff easterly wind blowing in the morning, which was forecast to subdue to 5 knots later: That never happened! I headed out 12 to 18 miles from New Pass with Bill Conklin and family, including a couple of young children. The ride out wasn’t too bad, and seas were tolerable while we were fishing, but the ride back in was slow and tedious, with high surf and winds at 20-25 knots. Bill released a 27-inch (out-of-season) gag grouper, which barely made it to the boat, as it was literally being charged by dolphins. The dolphins were out in force, trying to steal all our fish, so we moved to another spot, where the family caught ten keeper food-fish, including lane snapper and grunts.

    Thursday, 3/31, NOAA was still calling for calm seas but I knew better, after the experience of the previous day. The wind was slightly less than it had been, but seas were far from calm. So, I advised Frank Partee that it would be best to take him, his son-in-law, Joe Regan, and Frank’s three young grandchildren, David, Jack and Michael, to near-shore spots, rather than venturing too far offshore. We fished about 8 miles west of New Pass using live shrimp. The group caught three keeper lane snapper to 12 inches, two keeper porkfish, a few grunts, and a 14-inch hogfish keeper. They released red grouper shorts, a couple of small gag grouper, and blue runners.

    Friday, April 1st, seas were still three-to-four feet and winds blew 15 to 20 knots, defying NOAA’s predictions, as they had all week. I headed offshore with Bill Conklin again, who had fished with me Wednesday. This trip, Bill brought his daughter and son-in-law, Sarah and Jan Ramge, and their daughter, Libby. The family used live shrimp about 10 miles west of New Pass to box three keeper lane snapper, a keeper mangrove snapper, four porkfish, three sheepshead all 14 to 15 inches, and a mess of grunts and porgies. They released four triggerfish shorts, four mangrove snapper shorts, and a 40-inch black-nose shark.

    I advised Andy Chezem that seas were likely to be rough Saturday morning, 4/2, when he was scheduled to fish offshore with his fifteen-year-old son, Sam, and his eleven-year-old-son, Gabe, and I offered the option of fishing the backwaters. But, the boys had their hearts set on going offshore, and said they didn’t mind the waves. So, we compromised on a near-shore excursion to the reefs just off Bonita Beach, where the guys used live shrimp in four-foot seas to catch a 16-inch seatrout, three keeper sheepshead to 15 inches, three keeper mangrove snapper to nearly 15 inches, and a half-dozen whiting. They released a few ladyfish and crevalle jacks.

    Monday morning, 4/4, was drizzly and still on the windy side, but the light showers were widely scattered, and they did not stop Art Arvanites, his son-in-law, Mark, and Art’s grandkids, Shannon and Adam, from heading out to the near-shore reefs to fish. Using live shrimp, the family caught six keeper mangrove snapper to 14 inches and a mess of large grunts. They released lots of lane snapper shorts, and also got to feel the weight of a couple goliath grouper on their lines, until they broke off.

    Bradley Miller and his friend, Darren, fished near-shore with me on Tuesday morning, 4/4/16. Seas were still too rough to get out too far, so we fished the near-shore reefs and a few other spots close in. Bradley reeled in a 27 ½ inch snook, on shrimp, photographed it, and released it, as it was ½ inch below legal size. The guys also caught an 18-inch sheepshead and a whiting. They released eight mangrove snapper shorts, two crevalle jacks, a pair of 17-inch ladyfish, and some grunts.
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    Winds were howling again on Wednesday morning, 4/6, so Mark & Jeanine Miller and Mark’s dad, Gary, decided to fish the backwaters of lower Hickory Bay, rather than heading into the gulf. Using live shrimp, the family caught and released two snook at 17 inches and 20 inches. They caught a few keepers, including a brace of 14-inch sheepshead, along with a 16-inch trout. They also released five sheepshead shorts.

    Winds and seas calmed down nicely for Thursday’s (4/7) offshore trip with frequent fishers, Ron Musick and Eddie Alfonso, and we headed out about 22 miles west of New Pass. The guys did well with lane snapper, boxing thirty-five keepers to 12 inches. They added three nice porgies, and released grunts and short red grouper to 19 inches, all caught on shrimp.

    Friday, 4/8, seas were still pretty calm, and I headed offshore 22 miles with Leo Walsh and friends. Two keeper red grouper, each 21 ½ inches made their way to the fish box, after biting on pinfish. Live shrimp yielded twenty lane snapper to 14 inches, so the group ended up with plenty of food-fish. They released red grouper shorts and blue runners.

    The photo shown is of Bradley Miller with a 27 ½-inch snook, caught on shrimp at the near-shore reefs off Bonita Beach on a recent trip, and released, due to being ½-inch short of legal size.


    You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
    http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

    Comment


    • April has been mild and producing great fishing for anglers inshore and
      offshore. The water temperatures are rising and the bait schools are
      starting show. Lets hope April produces lots great fishing action.


      The Recent heat and rising water temperatures equals fantastic snook
      action. Snook are abundant everywhere you look. Docks, seawalls and
      flats are teaming with schoolie snook and big female snook are on the
      prowl. Live mullet and greenies great baits for snook lurking along
      sea walls and docks. Top water heddon spooks great baits to locate
      and hook up with snook during low light conditions. Heddon super
      spook in okee shad and bone color great choices for snook anglers.
      Docks and sea walls and anglers can use DOA C.A.L 3 inch shad in
      holographic and glow holographic for best bet. The average size of
      the snook have been from 5 to 25 pounds. Sight fishing for snook is a
      blast and can easily make an angler tremble and knees buckle, as
      nerves take over, this is what fishing is all about.


      Big Jacks crevelles are roaming local sea walls and flats, these fish are
      ambushing mullet schools. The jacks are in school and many of them
      will take any live bait like a mullet, greenie or pinfish in there
      vicinity. Artificial lures like a DOA C.A.L. 5.5 inch jerk bait in
      pearl or glow holographic trigger strikes as the bait is work on the
      surface. Top water heddon spooks work great as well I like to take
      the treble hooks off and put J hooks on it easier for the fish and
      the angler.


      Grass flats are teaming with bait schools and the snook, trout, jacks,
      bluefish and others are lurking on the outside of these bait pods.
      Live baits like greenies and pinfish under a cork work great but a
      DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in pearl or holographic on a 1/8 ounce jig
      head or a DOA Terror Eyez in pearl green back excellent choice, as
      you match the hatch.


      Freshwater the local lake and canals are full of life as the peacock bass are
      roaming the sea walls and shorelines. Live shiners and DOA Lures like
      the new 2.75 inch shrimp in glow and gold rush belly great baits for
      triggering strikes. Other exotic species like the mayan cichlid,
      knife fish and other exotics are thriving as the water temperatures
      begin to rise.


      Well that is the fishing report for the past week hope you all enjoyed.
      Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and
      get hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
      PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

      Comment


      • Sunshine prevails and the showers are starting to show as well. Warm weather makes us all happy, outdoor activities whether fishing or hanging out on the boat, bring lots of fun in the sun with friends and family.

        Snook fishing is producing plenty of drag screaming action for anglers. Docks seawalls and local inlets are holding plenty of fish. The snook are taking live mullet and thread fins drifted with tide along channel edges and seawalls. Artificial lures like a DOA 5.5 jerk bait in pearl or glow holographic rigged on a 5/0 long shank hook rigged weedless great set up for snook. The advantage with weedless is you can work the baits along structure with out getting snagged, adding weight can help get the bait down in the water column if needed. Fly anglers the dock lights offer rod bending action and can produce lots of fish in a few hours, match the hatch and the drag will scream. Small flies in white and DOA 2 inch shrimp in glow or pearl also great bait for snook as it presents a small silhouette.

        Tarpon action will start heating up and the bigger fish will be along the beaches and in the inlets on the first and last of the incoming tide. Live bait mullet and pinfish along with DOA bait busters are the best methods to get hooked up. The average size of the tarpon has been 10 to 60 pounds. The key with the tarpon is is locate the fish and set up up current and present the baits in a natural presentation.

        The grass flats are holding a plethora of species snook, trout, jacks, drum and many others are all taking DOA 3 inch shad in glow gold rush belly on a 1/8 ounce jig head. Look for birds or bait schools in the area and work that area thoroughly. The predator fish are always lurking near the bait schools.

        Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed. Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,

        Comment


        • Monday, 4/11, I headed offshore with Tom Breyer, his son Scott, grandson Reid, and Reid’s friend, Logan. Winds were hefty, and NOAA’s prediction for two-to-three-foot seas was about a foot short of reality. We tried fishing a few spots close-in but the bite wasn’t great, so the group decided to brave the three-to-four-foot seas to get out 22 miles, where snapper fishing with live shrimp has been good. They caught twenty-five keeper lane snapper to 11 inches, and released twenty-four red grouper shorts to 18 inches. At one point, they almost had a keeper red grouper that bit a pinfish, but it was barely hooked in the lip and popped off just before it got boat-side.

          Frequent customers Ron Musick, Eddie Alfonso, and Dick Arnett were joined by their friends, John and Lauren Smith, Tuesday, 4/12, when we headed offshore 25 miles west of New Pass in calm seas. The group caught four keeper red grouper, three at 21 ½ inches and one at 22 inches. They also caught two dozen keeper lane snapper to 17 inches, along with a few nice-sized grunts. They released lots of red grouper shorts, along with two sharks, one four-footer and one six-footer. The grouper bit on baitfish, and everything else took live shrimp.

          Wednesday, 4/13, in calm seas once again, I headed offshore, this time with Russell and Sherri Marcus and their friend, Tony Stinson. Pinfish yielded four keeper red grouper, all between 21 and 22 inches. Live shrimp worked well for snappers, and the group boxed twenty keeper lanes to 14 inches, along with a 14-inch mangrove snapper. They released a 19-inch gag grouper, eleven red grouper shorts, and nine mangrove snapper shorts.

          Fishing was pretty slow in Estero Bay’s backwaters Thursday morning, 4/14, when I fished a catch-and-release trip with Leed Hutchinson and his son, Bill. The guys released a mangrove snapper, two stingray and a crevalle jack.

          Clint Malikowski, Matt Dubiel, and Alex Grilde took advantage of some time off while their wives attended a professional conference in our area on Friday, 4/15. We headed out twenty miles west of New Pass, where Matt got to feel the pull of an 80-pound goliath grouper, which bit a large baitfish, and provided a good battle before being released. He also landed a keeper, 21-inch red grouper on a pinfish. The group collectively caught and released twenty-five red grouper shorts, seven of which were just ¼-inch short of legal size. Using live shrimp, they caught two dozen keeper-sized lane snapper, but chose to release them, all but the largest one at 14 inches, and they released a half dozen mangrove snapper shorts.

          Saturday morning, 4/16, Clint Malikowski fished with me again, this time joined by his wife, Ashley Nord, and friend, Mike Jabara. Seas were significantly rougher than they had been the day before, and we only went out about 15 miles from New Pass. The guys caught and released two goliath groupers, estimated at 60 pounds and 100 pounds, which bit on blue runners. They also released all their other catches, which included a dozen lane snapper, a 13-inch mangrove snapper, blue runners, bluefish, and a gag grouper short.

          Winds persisted for the next couple days, and seas remained too rough offshore for my Monday, 4/18, trip with Remi McKinnon, his two young sons, Mark and Luke, and the boys’ grandfather, Ian. So I advised the family to fish the backwaters of lower Hickory Bay, where they used live shrimp to catch an 18 ¼ -inch trout and an 11 ½-inch mangrove snapper. They released a 40-inch bonnethead shark and a ten-pound stingray.

          Mike Beverstock a, along with family and friends, Frank, Bridget and Liz, managed a near-shore trip with me, as seas began to subside on Tuesday, 4/19. Fishing at the reefs just a few miles off Bonita beach with live shrimp, the group caught and released a 22 ½-inch gag grouper, along with lots of mangrove snapper shorts and grunts. They also caught three nice sheepshead to 17 inches, a 16-inch Spanish mackerel, and a 15-inch flounder.

          Jennifer and Shawn Bull, along with teenaged son, Jared, and Jared’s friends Mark and John Polymeros, had hoped to get well offshore on Wednesday, 4/20, but seas were not real cooperative, and we had to stay within 12 miles of shore. Dolphins invaded one of the best spots, which ruined our chances of catching fish there, so we went to several other close-in spots to fish with live shrimp. As for food-fish, the group ended up catching 13 grunts and two keeper lane snapper. They released numerous red grouper shorts.

          Seas weren’t much calmer Thursday morning, 4/21, though they did calm down some as the day progressed. Frequent customer, Ron Musick, has only a couple more opportunities to get out fishing this season, and it was worth braving some sloppy conditions to him to ride out 25 miles and go after grouper. Ron brought his friends, Eddie Alfonso, Dick Arnett, and Dick’s brother-in-law, Jim Mix. Each of the four guys ended up with their own keeper red grouper, all measuring between 21 and 22 inches and biting on pinfish. They added four nice porgies they caught on shrimp to the fish box.

          Friday morning, 4/22, NOAA got it wrong again, with predictions for two-foot seas out to 20 miles. I headed out with Casey Miller and friends, and seas were a lot rougher than predicted, with a steady wind blowing across the gulf. We fished the near-shore reefs off Bonita Beach, using live shrimp. The group caught three sheepshead to 14 inches, and released four gag grouper to 20 inches, along with some grunts. They had a few snappers on the line too, but the barracuda got to those before they could be boated.



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          The photo shown is of angler, Dave Leesman with a 31-inch gag grouper, caught on a baitfish and released, due to closed season, on a recent trip.


          You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
          http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
          Captain Dave Hanson
          Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
          Bonita Beach, FL
          239 947-1688
          fishbuster@comcast.net
          http://www.fishbustercharters.com

          Comment


          • The sunny weather continues and produces that florid heat! Hot weather
            and hot bite goes hand and hand, keep the sunshine upon us.


            Inshore snook fishing continues to shine as snook are migrating out of the
            back waters up onto flats and channel edges near local inlets.
            Anglers in a half day trip are averaging 15 to 20 snook, working
            docks, seawalls, and drop offs. Top water heedon spooks worked slow
            produce explosive action on the surface. The super spook has produced
            fish but at times using smaller spook Jr trigger more strikes do to
            smaller profile. Docks worked with DOA shrimp or DOA cal 3 inch shad
            entice the snook to strike as well. Holographic and pearl great
            colors for enticing snook. Night fishing is also a great option for
            those looking to beat the heat. Live shrimp, mullet or small greenie
            gets the snook attention, but for artificial enthusiast small flies
            and DOA shrimp in glow and holographic great choice ads well.


            Tarpon action is great around deep channels and mangrove shorelines. Live
            baits free lined with the tide and jigs hopped along the bottom
            produce many hook ups. The tarpon are schooled up look for rolling
            fish and lead the fish , this will better your odds and get the rod
            bent.


            The big jacks are roaming are local seawalls, these fish are pure muscle
            and do not give up easily. Top water heddon spook plugs worked early
            morning provide explosive action, be sure your drag is set tight and
            hold on. For the kids small schoolie jacks are found near bait
            schools, a circle hook rigged with a live bait and cork will keep the
            rids bent and the kids smiling from ear to ear.


            The black drum bite has been great on channel edges live shrimp good
            choice but DOA Cal 4 jerk in glow holographic excellent bait rigged
            on ¼ ounce jig head. The black drum are averaging 4 to 10 pounds.


            Freshwater bite has been phenomenal as the warm weather has the peacock bass
            ready to strike anything in there vicinity. Docks, seawalls and
            shorelines are holding plenty of peacock bass. Live shiners work but
            DOA shrimp and DOA cal3 inch shad in glow and gold rush belly gets
            the job done as well. Fly anglers, popper flies produce great top
            water strikes and great drag screaming action. The large mouth bass
            are active early morning and evening striking DOA swim baits in
            morning glory and pearl color rigger weedless. Heavy structure and
            grassy shorelines great area to locate large mouth bass.


            Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.
            Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get
            hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
            PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

            Comment


            • May has arrived and the fishing inshore will produce great catches for
              anglers. The baits schools start to show and seas begin to calm, get
              your ready its time for some rod bending action.


              Snook action is firing, docks, seawalls, and shorelines continue to be the
              main targets. The snook are very active early morning and late
              afternoon. Live baits like thredfins, mullet and pinfish freelined
              with a circle hook trigger strikes, corks may be used when working
              deeper holes this keeps the bait near surface creating disturbance
              for predator fish to key in on. Top water heddon super spooks work
              great along seawalls and flats in a walk the dog manner, chartreuse
              head and bone back has been the best color as of late. Dock fishing
              nothing beats a DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad holographic or glow
              holographic on a ¼ jig head. The glass minnow pods have been thick
              so mimic the bait schools and game on. Fly fishing deceivers in
              white or green back and white belly great choice for working the back
              waters, docks and seawalls, lighter the tippet the more strikes. The
              full moon coming this month will trigger the spawn for the snook.
              This is the time when the big female fish gather in the local inlets,
              offering snook catches reaching double digit numbers.


              Tarpon are starting to show in local inlets but the big pods of fish are
              still migrating south from the Stuart area. The back bays still hold
              juvenile fish, these fish are willing to take small mullet, greenies
              and pinfish. DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk baits holographic and glow
              holographic on a ¼ ounce jig head get the tarpons attention. Look
              for rolling fish as signs of life in the area, be sure to get in
              front of the fish and avoid spooking them, stealth is the key.


              The grass flats are holding big schools of glass minnows and the trout,
              snook, jacks,bluefish and many others are wrecking havoc on these
              baits. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in holographic or pearl rigged weedless
              great tactic for getting strikes, fly anglers small deceivers and
              popper flies in white or gummy minnows perfect flies for getting the
              rod bent.


              Freshwater side the peacock bass continue to provide explosive action for top
              water lure and flies. From sun up to sundown the action is
              consistent. Angler looking to produce big numbers live shiners will
              great as well. Artificial enthusiasts DOA C.A.L 3 inch shad in candy
              corn rigged weedless or with a chugger head is deadly bait for
              peacock and largemouth bass as well. The large mouth bass are very
              aggressive along the edges of channels and along sea walls. Early
              morning and evening anglers top water heddon spook jr in baby bass or
              okee shad excellent colors for consistent hook ups.


              Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.
              Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get
              hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
              PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

              Comment


              • After a couple days off, I was back on the water Tuesday, 4/26, when I headed 28 miles offshore in calm seas with frequent fishers Ron Musick, Eddie Alfonso, and Dick Arnett, joined by friend, John. This was the last fishing trip of the season for Ron, so we had to finish off with at least one keeper grouper, and we got that—a 20 ¾ inch red grouper. We released numerous red grouper shorts, five of which were 19 7/8 inches, just 1/8 inch short of legal size. The guys added to the fish box a mess of keeper lane snapper and a few grunts. The groupers bit baitfish, and we used live shrimp for the snapper.

                Wednesday and Thursday, 4/27 and 4/28 were reserved for Barry Garner and his friend, Brad. Barry had thought about fishing the gulf one day, and the bay the next, but after seeing steady action offshore on Wednesday, he and Brad decided to spend both of their mornings fishing the gulf. The guys had no facilities for cooking fish while visiting our area, and were interested only in catch-and-release. On Wednesday, we headed out 20 miles from New Pass, where the Barry and Brad caught two dozen keeper-sized lane snapper, all around the 11-inch mark, ten grunts, all 11 to 12 inches, seven porgies in the 13 to 14-inch range, twenty red grouper shorts to 19 ½ inches, a few yellowtail snapper shorts, and big blue runners that weighed about 4 pounds. The larger red groupers bit on baitfish, while everything else bit live shrimp. On Thursday morning, we headed out to 23 miles west of New Pass, and the guys had pretty much the same kind of action they’d had the day before. They released lots of red grouper shorts to 19 ¾ inches, along with fifteen lane snapper that were keeper-size, 25 yellowtail shorts, a dozen mangrove snapper shorts, three porgies to 14 inches, and a brace of 14-inch triggerfish. The larger red grouper bit baitfish, and everything else bit shrimp.

                Patrick Dryer, Josh Langelane, and Ronan Banahan fished 23 miles west of New Pass with me in calm seas, which was a treat, on Friday morning, 4/29. The guys used live shrimp to catch 48 lane snapper, keeping 23 of those to 17 inches, and releasing the rest. They also released twenty-five red grouper shorts to 19 ½ inches. They added to the fish box three grunts to 12 inches and four 24-inch Spanish mackerel, and released four additional mackerel.
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                Friday’s calm seas turned out to be short-lived. Though predictions were for two foot seas or, at worst, two to three foot seas on Saturday, 4/30, conditions were rougher than that when I headed offshore with Dave and Diane Carey and their friends, John and LuAnn Petterson. We managed to get out 22 miles, in hopes of catching grouper, but the six red grouper we caught on shrimp were shorts to 19 ½ inches, just shy of keeper-size. We released those, along with ten of the twenty keeper-sized lane snapper we caught (the group had no need for more than ten.) We used a blue runner we’d caught as shark bait, and battled a nurse shark estimated at 150 pounds, before photographing it in the water and releasing it.

                The winds continued to blow Monday, 5/2, defying NOAA’s two-to-three foot seas predictions for offshore. But, hardy anglers Patrick Dryer and Ronan Bonahan, who had fished with me in calm seas the previous Friday, got a taste of three-to-five foot seas on Monday, 23 miles west of New Pass. They were joined on this trip by Ronan’s dad, David Bonahan. The group used baitfish to catch lots of red grouper, two of which were keepers at 21 ½ inches and 25 inches. Using live shrimp, they caught twenty-five lane snappers to 14 inches, along with one keeper mangrove snapper at 13 inches. They released six additional mangrove snappers that were shorts.

                Tuesday morning, 5/3, I fished 13 miles west of New Pass on a near-shore trip with Roger Meir and his son and daughter, Roger, Jr. and Melanie. Using live shrimp, the family caught six keeper lane snapper. They released lots of blue runners, a red grouper short, a triggerfish short, and a 35-inch sharpnose shark.

                I had planned to fish offshore Wednesday morning, 5/4, but predictions of severe weather cancelled out those plans, with rains expected by mid-morning, and severe thunderstorms to follow by mid-afternoon. For the next couple of days, seas were predicted to be 4-to-6 feet offshore.

                The photo shown is of Patrick Dryer with a 25-inch red grouper caught on a baitfish.


                You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
                http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
                Captain Dave Hanson
                Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                Bonita Beach, FL
                239 947-1688
                fishbuster@comcast.net
                http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                Comment


                • May is gearing up for spectacular fishing on the rise. The full moon of
                  May brings extreme high tides as well as low, which in return signals
                  breeding time for many species. Prepare all of your gear and get
                  ready for the showdown.

                  The snook fishing continues to prevail, lots if big fish are around as
                  they are waiting for the May full moon. The snook are preparing to
                  start spawning in the inlets and deep channels. The back bays and
                  canals still offer great numbers of fish.. Average size of the snook
                  has been 15 to 35 inches. Live baits free lined along sea walls and
                  shorelines produce big snook on the falling tide, mullet and
                  threadfins have been the best baits to use for the snook. Top water
                  heed on spooks in bone and white chartreuse head great lures to
                  entice snook to feed during low light hours. The inlets and channels
                  edges DOA C.A.L. 4 inch in Arkansas glow and watermelon holographic
                  rigged on a ½ jig head excellent baits for triggering the snook to
                  strike along the bottom. Beach fishing will start to heat up as seas
                  calm and nothing beats a DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad tail in pearl rigged
                  on a 1/8 ounce jig head to get your rod bent.


                  Silver king lovers, your time is coming, the bigger tarpon are migrating
                  down south to our area. These fish are schooled together and the
                  average size of the fish will be around 50 to 100 pounds. The back
                  bays and canals are holding 10 to 30 pound fish, which are a blast on
                  light tackle. Live mullet free lined in front of the tarpon pods
                  triggers strikes. Inlets live sardines great bait to use rigged with
                  a ½ ounce led near rock jetties on an outgoing tide. DOA bait
                  busters in pearl and green back color great baits to cast up current
                  and let bait preternaturally to schooling fish , just wait for the
                  thump and and come tight and the game is on.


                  The flats are teaming with a plethora of species right now do tonal the
                  baits in the area. Black drum, trout, snook, jacks, snapper and many
                  others are willingly striking live baits free lined along bait
                  schools for best results. Corks can be used for those needing an
                  indicator. Fly anglers deceivers and popper flies great for working
                  the flats creating surface strikes for the angler, nothing beats
                  seeing strike. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad and 4 inch jerk baits work
                  great on the flats rigged weedless, work edges of baits schools and
                  pot holes along the flats.


                  Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.
                  Remember you cant catch them from the couch. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig
                  Korczynski, PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

                  Comment


                  • Snook season closes June 1st and the monster fish are everywhere
                    you look. The docks, seawalls, flats and deep passes all are holding
                    fish. Top water heddon spooks during low light hours creates
                    explosive action for anglers, doa 4 inch cal with 1/8 ounce jig head
                    and live baits worked through out the day will keep the drag
                    screaming as well. The average size of the snook has been 2 to 25
                    pounds.


                    Tarpon fishing is hot in the inlets and ICW, the beaches as well are
                    producing fish when seas allow. Live baits drifted with the tide
                    creates strikes, doa cal gold and glow with 1/8 ounce jig head great
                    way to jump a silver king. Tides are the key to dancing with the
                    silver kings and be sure to have a good rod and reel, always bow to
                    the king. Average size of the tarpon has been 5 to 80 pounds.


                    Sea trout are striking doa shrimp and doa cal along with deceiver flies
                    and live baits. The trout are be found in pot holes with grassy
                    bottom. Sea trout are aggressive on both sides of the tides and range
                    in size from 2 to 8 pounds.


                    Warm weather has the peacock bass bit going off. The peacock are hanging
                    along seawalls, docks , drop offs, bridges and shorelines. Fast
                    moving lures like a weedless 3 or 4 inch cal in gold and glow, or
                    figi chix gets the strike. Top water plugs like a heedon spook jr
                    entices great explosions well. Fly fishing is another great way to
                    battles these colorful beauties, small deceivers and minnow patterns
                    work great.


                    The best thing about fishing in south Florida there are so many species
                    to target in our local waters especially exotic species. Mayan
                    chichlids, oscars, clown knife fish and many others are caught will
                    roaming the freshwater water ways. These species are very active as
                    water temperatures rise and doa lures, fly fishing and live baits
                    will get the rod bent.


                    Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.
                    Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get
                    hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
                    PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 5616444371

                    Comment


                    • SW FL-Bonita Beach: Some Big Game this week

                      I was off the water for a few days, with busy season winding down, and fishing trips not scheduled every day of the week, as they have been for the past several months. On Wednesday, 5/11, I fished inshore in lower Hickory Bay with Nat Drourr and his son, Josh. Using live shrimp, the guys caught and released a 22-inch snook, along with eight mangrove snapper, two of which were keepers.

                      After another lull in trips, which happened to fall during a period of no rain and calm seas, my next trip out was on Tuesday, 5/17, when rain hung over the gulf, and winds and seas picked up, causing some pretty rough conditions. But long-time customer, Jim Dean, along with his son, Jeremy, headed out 22 miles with me anyway, where they used pinfish to catch a 21-inch keeper red grouper, and released ten smaller ones. They used live shrimp to add a 14-inch porgy and two keeper lane snapper to the fish box, and they released eight lane shorts.

                      Jim Dean fished with me again on Wednesday, 5/18, following a full over-night of thunderstorms. By early morning, there remained only some residual scattered rains over the gulf, and seas had calmed, compared with their levels the day before. Jim decided to risk getting wet in order to go after some big fish to fight. It never did rain in the spots we fished, mostly about 20 miles west of New Pass. And, Jim definitely got the battles and adrenaline surges he was seeking. He battled a tiger shark that was over ten feet long for about an hour, after it bit on a crevalle jack. Of course, my Go-Pro camera malfunctioned, or I’d have had some great video of that. But Jim was wearing a Go-Pro the entire time, and we are hoping he got some good video that he can send my way. Jim also released three goliath grouper, with estimated weights of 50 pounds, 100 pounds, and 400 pounds. Those also bit on crevalle jacks. Jim is likely to feel those catches on his arm muscles for a few days!
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                      Friday, 5/20, I headed offshore to 25 miles west of New Pass with Mark and Liz Venturin, their son Bob, and uncle, Mike Sturgeon. We fished for grouper with baitfish, and the group caught 26 red grouper, though we had to release all but one keeper at 21 inches. Twelve of the shorts were between 19 and 19 ¾ inches, just shy of keeper size. We hooked and fought a big king mackerel that eventually broke the line, as did a big shark, both of which bit on baitfish and offered some good arm-breaking battles! Using live shrimp, we caught two dozen keeper lane snapper and a dozen grunts to add to the fish box, and that, along with the keeper red grouper, provided plenty of food fish for the family.



                      You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
                      http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
                      Captain Dave Hanson
                      Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                      Bonita Beach, FL
                      239 947-1688
                      fishbuster@comcast.net
                      http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                      Comment


                      • Calm winds prevailed this past week, making fishing sessions perfect for sight casters. Calm seas have excited anglers as well, allowing many to explore, well offshore. Summer is near and we can only hope these conditions continue, but with a little rain.

                        The ICW still providing great silver king action, beaches as well are producing great fishing. The tarpon on the beach are ranging in size from 40 to 90 pounds. Live baits like sardines and mullet work great free lined on the surface or a weight added to get bait near bottom works as well. DOA Bait busters and DOA 5 inch swim baits in pearl and green back pearl excellent baits for hooking up with the silver king. The key is fishing early morning and stealth, be very quiet. The fish are schooled up and can be seen near the shorelines rolling in the surface. Always lead the fish and never cast into the pod this will spook them all ending your pursuit to a hook up.


                        Snook anglers this is the time, the snook are in the inlets and along the beaches. Live bait anglers greenies and sardines work great, but artificial lures are more gratifying, nothing beats a DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk baits in bayou tiger or Arkansas glow on a 3/8 ounce jig head to get your drag screaming. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad work great as well as they stand out and offer a different silhouette. Docks and seawalls holding fish as well, Heddon Super Spooks in Bone and chartreuse bone color early morning and late afternoon offer explosive action and lead to many fish ranging in the 15 to 25 pound class. The average size of the snook has been 5 to 25 pounds.


                        The grass flats are offering a plethora of species for angler to tango with, trout, snook, drum, jacks, snapper and a few flounder. Live baits pods are prevalent on the flats using greeines free lined or under a cork will get the rod bent. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in pearl or holographic great bait on a jig head working the edges of the baits schools for great success.


                        The exotic peacock bass fishing has been on point, peacocks have been in schools around docks, seawalls, bridges and sandy shorelines. Live shiners work for those looking for set out a cork and wait, or you can use heddon spook jr in chartreuse fro explosive surface strikes. Flies like gurglers, poppers and deceivers produce great numbers of fish as well, nothing beats watching these colorful beauties come up and swallow your fly in front and center. DOA shrimp and DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in candy corn and fire tiger great colors as they mimic the Mayan cichlids pattern, peacock favorite forage.


                        Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed. Remember you cant catch them from the couch. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski, PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

                        Comment


                        • June has produced plenty of heat and the fun in the sun will begin for the
                          kids. Summer is closing in and lets hope the fishing will produce
                          great action for us anglers.


                          The inshore fishing is producing great catches of snook, near inlets deep
                          channels and along sea walls. Live baits like mullet, pinfish,
                          sardines and greenies excellent live baits for linesiders. Live baits
                          free lined or used on a knocker rig best method fro hooking up.
                          Artificail enthusiast DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait in Alewife and
                          Arkansas glow rigged on a 3/8 ounce jig head excellent choice bait
                          for working the inlets and deeper channel edges. Beaches DOA C.A.L. 3
                          inch shad in pearl and glow holographic best colors to consistent
                          hook ups. The snook are very active early in the morning and late
                          afternoon and well into the night. Average size of the snook has
                          ranged from 2 to 20 pounds. Heddon spooks worked in a walk the dog
                          brings plenty of surface explosions, the snook are very aggressive on
                          the flats.
                          Work pot holes and bait schools for best results.

                          Tarpon are still abundant of the icw waters near canals and bays. Live
                          sardines and mullet drifted near channel edges and mangrove
                          shorelines provide explosive action. DOA Bait buster in green back
                          and pearl worked near the bottom work great as well, morning and
                          late afternoon best time to target the tarpon. Outgoing tide provides
                          best action as well look for rolling fish as clues to work baits.


                          Grass flats are holding a wide variety of fish at sunrise when waters are
                          cool. Snook, trout, jacks, snapper, and lady fish are all present.
                          Live shrimp, greenies and jigs under a popping cork, will get your
                          rod bent. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in pearl and glow gold rush belly on
                          a 1/8 ounce jig head great set up for consistent hook ups.


                          The mangrove shorelines, docks and channel pilings have been holding nice
                          triple tail. Live shrimp or small greenies pitched in the tripletail
                          vicinity will get you hook up. DOA shrimp in glow or a DOA 3 inch
                          shad in pearl or figi chix trigger strikes as well. Typical size of
                          the triple tail has been 2 to 10 pounds.


                          Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope everybody enjoyed.
                          Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get
                          hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
                          PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

                          Comment


                          • Wednesday, 5/25, I headed 18 miles offshore with Dr. Paul Martz and Christian LeClerc. Seas were choppy heading out, but comfortable once anchored, and the guys used baitfish to catch numerous red grouper, including one 21-inch keeper. We also caught a beauty of a hogfish at 19 inches, which bit on live shrimp, along with a keeper lane snapper and four good sized grunts.

                            The Mazzola family (a combination of brothers and cousins) fished offshore 36 miles with me on a full-day trip Saturday, 5/28. Calm seas allowed us to get out to some good spots, and the guys caught three keeper red grouper on baitfish, consisting of a brace of 21-inch and one 22-inch. Using live shrimp, they caught a mess of lane snapper, and kept a dozen of those to 12 inches, along with a 13 ½-inch keeper mangrove snapper. They added to the fish box a couple of nice porgies, and released ten more of those, and also kept a couple of 13-inch grunts, out of a mess of grunts they caught. They caught a nice triggerfish at 15 inches, but triggers are currently out of season, so we released that, along with twenty yellowtail snapper shorts. It was a productive and fun day of fishing for all!

                            I returned to fishing on Tuesday, 5/31, after some family events over the Memorial Day weekend, and was happy to see calm seas as I headed offshore with Steve cook, his son, Kullen, and Steve’s father-in-law, Denziel Sturgeon. We fished 20 miles west of New Pass, with baitfish and live shrimp. The red grouper bit on baitfish, and we caught fifteen of those, including one keeper at 21 inches. Live shrimp brought us twenty-two keeper lane snapper to 14 inches, along with a brace of 13-inch porgies. We released a 40-inch sharpnose shark, as well as a 13 ½-inch triggerfish.

                            Steve Cook and friends had initially planned to fish offshore Tuesday and in the bay on Wednesday, but after so much fun and catching success offshore on Tuesday, they decided to head back into the gulf on Wednesday, 6/1. Their morning was nearly a carbon copy of the previous on. They used baitfish to catch another 21-inch red grouper keeper, and released lots of grouper shorts. They also caught fourteen keeper lane snapper to 14 inches on shrimp, along with a 25-inch Spanish mackerel. They again caught a sharpnose shark, about 40 inches, as was the one the previous day. They released the shark, along with a bunch of yellowtail snapper shorts. They also got to see some dolphin up-close, when those notorious fish-stealers invaded our snapper hole!

                            Thursday morning, 6/2, I fished inshore in lower Hickory Bay with Will and Melissa Tucker and Melissa’s parents, Bobby and Laura Davis. Using live shrimp, the group caught a 20-inch keeper redfish, and released a 17-inch red. They added to the box five keeper mangrove snapper and a 13-inch sheepshead. They released five stingray.

                            Walter Mistak, his son and daughter, Walter, Jr. and Monica, fished offshore with me Friday morning, 6/3, about 20 miles west of New Pass, using shrimp for bait. The family caught eleven keeper lane snapper to 15 inches, and released lots of lane shorts. They also released lots of red grouper shorts to 19 inches, as well as three triggerfish, all about 13 inches, and a 25-inch king mackerel. They added to the fish box a couple porgies, and released five additional porgies.They also fought and released a 30-inch bonnethead shark.

                            Long-time customer, Jeff Heinrich, was scheduled to fish offshore for a full day on Monday, 6/6, but the tropical depression making its way toward Florida was due to arrive on Monday, and to bring rainy weather and rough conditions for much of the week. We tried our best to beat all that by fishing on Sunday, 6/5, when Jeff was joined by his young daughter, Maddie, and by Jeff’s brother, Scott, and his young daughter, Lacey. NOAA had predicted two-foot seas within 20 miles of shore, and two-to-four foot seas beyond 20 miles. We ventured out 20 miles from New Pass, and we encountered three-to-four footers, with a steady 15-20 knot wind. So, we ventured no further than 20 miles. Using live shrimp, the family caught and released fifteen red grouper to 19 7/8 inches, just shy of keeper-size. They did get some fish to eat, though, with a total of twenty lane snapper keepers, one 13-inch keeper mangrove snapper, and a few grunts. They released several yellowtail snapper shorts. About 11AM, rain could be seen over the gulf, and we knew we had to start toward shore, a bit shy of a half-day excursion and nowhere close to the full-day excursion originally planned. Sometimes, Mother Nature throws a wrench into the works. But, at least the family had some fun catching, and will have a couple of fresh fish dinners during their stay.

                            After that trip, there was nothing but rain and stormy weather for nearly a week. I finally got out fishing again on Saturday morning, 6/11, and headed 23 miles offshore with Darren Rachman, Mike Saxinger, and Mike’s dad, Jere Saxinger. We caught baitfish for grouper fishing, and used live shrimp for everything else. The group caught lots of red grouper, including one keeper at 21 inches. They caught a total of 24 keeper lane snapper to 18 inches, along with a 22-inch Spanish mackerel. They released a triggerfish, as well as four sharpnose shark that were all about 35 inches.

                            The photo shown is of Alana Augustine with a 23-inch gag grouper, caught on a baitfish and released (closed season) on a recent offshore trip.

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                            You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
                            http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
                            Captain Dave Hanson
                            Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                            Bonita Beach, FL
                            239 947-1688
                            fishbuster@comcast.net
                            http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                            Comment


                            • School is out let the fun in the sun begin and most importantly try and stay
                              dry. Anglers grab the family and get the drag screaming on those
                              reels. South east winds help bring the pelagics closer to our shores,
                              producing outstanding fishing action.


                              The bonita schools are thick offshore near wrecks and drop offs. Though
                              many anglers consider the bonitas a pain at times they sure put up a
                              big fight. These pesky fish are a blast on light tackle as well as on
                              fly. Fly fisherman can experience drag screaming action at its
                              finest, chumming can bring in 20 to 50 fish next to the boat creating
                              a feeding frenzy. This is time to put your tackle and favorite lures
                              to the test.


                              Snook anglers the fishing is steady but the best is still to come, the full
                              moon will trigger the spawning session. The docks and seawall are
                              great areas to locate snook using live mullet or thread-fins. Top
                              water heddon spooks create explosions when worked slowly during low
                              light hours bone or white chartreuse head great colors. The inlets
                              live thread-fins and pinfish on a lead sent to the bottom triggers
                              the snook to feed also DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk shad in pearl and Bayou
                              Tiger on a 3/8 ounce jig great tactic to produce strikes as well. The
                              back bays and canals are still holding smaller fish which are
                              schooling up in pods if 20 to 50 fish. Bridges are holding big
                              females near lights and shadow lines, trolled jigs or hard baits and
                              flies work great for these monsters.


                              Tarpon fanatics the beaches are starting to calm, allowing boats to navigate
                              in search of rolling fish. The bigger fish weighing 50 to 100 pounds
                              are in depths from 10 to 25 feet of water, sunrise is the best time
                              to target these fish. A live mullet, thread-fin or pinfish worked
                              near the bottom great bait to get the rod bent. The silver kings in
                              the back bays and deeper channels offer steady action for light
                              tackle anglers. These juvenile fish are averaging 5 to 30 pounds in
                              size, schooling in pods of 10 to 15 fish. Live greenies or pinfish
                              and DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in pearl or ale wife worked on the bottom
                              will provoke many strikes.


                              The grass flats are offering great numbers of snook, trout, jacks, drum
                              and snapper. The best method is to freeline a live bait near pot
                              holes channel edges or bait schools for best results. The grass flats
                              produce the best action on an outgoing tide. The big trout and snook
                              can be sight fished during low tide with DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad on a
                              1/8 ounce jig head.


                              The peacock bass action as well as the largemouth bass and other exotic
                              speceis are chewing live baits, DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk baits and
                              flies in there vicinity. The peacock bass are very aggressive along
                              dock and seawalls, striking any fast moving lure or bait with in
                              there reach. Popper flies work great for the peacock bass and as well
                              for the largemouth bass. Those looking to have consistent action live
                              shiners are the best bet but artificial lure create for explosive
                              strikes and excitement tricking these fish with a artificial bait.


                              Well that is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.
                              Remember you cant catch them from the couch , so get out there and
                              get hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
                              PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

                              Comment


                              • Sunshine summer is progressing and the heat is on. Mid day heat is unbearable
                                at times, showers help cool down heat but also bring plenty of
                                humidity. Stay cool and drink lots of fluids the fishing is hot as
                                well..


                                The Inshore fishing has been fantastic for Snook from Jupiter to Palm
                                Beach targeting local inlets. Fish the outgoing tide for best
                                results. Fish early morning, evening and night for best results when
                                targeting the Snook. Live greenies sand perch, and mullet have been
                                excellent baits to use for the Snook. Drop the bait to the bottom and
                                hold on these fish pull hard. Doa cal in 4 and 5.5 inch with 3/8
                                ounce jigs will also entice Snook, make sure the bait is on the
                                bottom. Once you find them mark the spot and fish it hard, the Snook
                                are schooled up ready to eat. The average size of the Snook has been
                                6 to 20 pounds.


                                The Tarpon fishing has been great early morning along the beaches north
                                of Palm Beach Inlet and out front of the Palm Beach inlet. Use live
                                greenies for best results. Lures like a DOA Bait buster or DOA C.A.L.
                                4 inch jerk bait in pearl or Green back will get you hooked. Look for
                                rolling fish and quietly get in front of the schools to present your
                                bait. The Tarpon are averaging 20 to 80 pounds.


                                The grass flats are teaming with trout and red fish, the bite has been
                                best during low light hours as water temperatures are cooler. Live
                                baits like greenies and mullet entice strikes. Doa cal in 3 inch and
                                doa shrimp in glow and gold rush belly and holographic get the drag
                                screaming as well. Work depths from 2 to 6 feet of water working drop
                                offs and pot holes for best results.


                                Peacock bass are roaming the shorelines in search of there next meal. Sight
                                fishing for the peacock bass using fly or artificial lrues is a
                                blast. The 2 inch doa shrimp in pearl fire tail great choice for the
                                fly rod, when using spinning gear a 3 doa shrimp in fire tiger and
                                glow and gold triggers the peacock bass consistently. Live shiners
                                work great for those looking for non stop action, the peacock bass
                                are ranging from 2 to 6 pounds.


                                Well that is the report for the past week hope you enjoyed. Remember you
                                cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get hooked up.
                                Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski PhlatsInshoreFishing.com,
                                561-644-4371

                                Comment


                                • Tuesday morning, 6/14, I fished a catch-and-release, inshore trip in Estero Bay with Mark Basrap and Shannon Featherman. The guys did well using live shrimp. Catches included a 32-inch bull-redfish, a 19-inch redfish, a 17-inch sheepshead, eleven mangrove snapper ranging 11 to 12 inches, a six-pound crevalle jack, and two stingrays, one weighing two pounds and the other twenty pounds. So there was plenty of variety and plenty of muscle exerted!
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                                  The photo shown is of Shannon Featherman with a 32-inch bull-redfish caught on shrimp on a recent inshore trip.


                                  After a lot of rainy days in port, I was looking forward to an offshore trip scheduled for Monday, 6/20. But there were 20 knot winds and small craft advisories that morning. I had nothing on the books for Tuesday, so I asked Greg Rundy and his son, Jacob, if they could fish Tuesday, 6/21 instead. That was a better day, by far, though still a bit choppy. We managed to get out 28 miles, where the guys used baitfish to catch lots of red grouper, including two keepers at 21 inches and 22 inches. They added to the fish box a brace of 13-inch porgies, along with ten of the twenty-five keeper-sized lane snapper they caught on shrimp, and released the rest, along with some yellowtail snapper and mangrove snapper shorts. They released ten 3-foot sharpnose sharks, and battled and released a 9-foot nurse shark. They also had a couple of big fish break their lines, most likely goliath grouper.

                                  Wednesday, 6/22, I spent the day fishing offshore, 28 miles west of New Pass, with long-time customer Russ Maavich, his three sons, Alex, Brett, and Ryan, and two of their friends, Nathan Hovlovic and Brenton Payne. The guys had a great day of fishing, boxing four keeper grouper, including a 28-inch gag grouper, a 21-inch red grouper, and two 22-inch red grouper. Those all bit on baitfish. The group released 30 additional red grouper that were short of keeper size, along with some yellowtail snapper and triggerfish shorts. They caught so many keeper lane snapper that they ended up releasing eighteen of those, keeping twelve of the largest to 17 inches.

                                  On Monday, 6/27, I headed offshore with Larry Jack, his son, David, and his brother-in-law, Tony Russo. Larry usually fishes with me each summer for a couple of days, usually once offshore and once inshore. We headed out 26 miles from New Pass on Monday in calm seas. Shrimp were in short supply, so we used mostly squid, octopus and grunts for bait, along with some frozen shrimp I had on hand. I guess the fish liked the bait well enough because the guys caught five keeper red grouper ranging 21 to 23 inches and a 15-inch porkfish. They released seventeen red grouper shorts. The guys also caught thirty-five lane snapper, fifteen of which were keepers to 15 inches. So arms were tired, and the fish box was full!

                                  Larry, David and Tony fished again with me Tuesday morning, 6/28, this time in lower Hickory Bay, where the action was nothing comparable to our offshore action of the day before. Lots of rain has dumped fresh water into the bay, which doesn’t help with catfish control! But the guys caught and released a 17 ½-inch redfish, along with a sheepshead short and four mangrove snapper shorts. They also released a two-pound stingray.

                                  Wednesday, 6/29, long-time customers Brian and Julie Clark fished thirty-six miles offshore with me, along with their friend, Rob. We used an assortment of baits, including shrimp, squid, and Spanish sardines. There were lots of red grouper biting, but most of those had to be released, since they were short of legal size. We did get one keeper red grouper, though, at 21 inches. The prize fish of the day was a nearly 21-inch hogfish—yum! The group also boxed six keeper mangrove snapper to 14 inches, a dozen nice whitebone porgies all 14 to 15 inches, six lane snapper, and five large grunts to 14 inches. They released lots of mangrove snapper and yellowtail shorts, along with five triggerfish, all around 15 inches. The goliath grouper came around at one point, trying to eat our bait, and we actually hooked two of those simultaneously. The lines crossed, and one got off, but we battled a 50-pounder and released it. We had our lines broken six times by those monsters!
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                                  The photo shown is of Brian Clark with a 21-inch hogfish caught on shrimp on a recent offshore trip.


                                  Brad Hayes and his son, Jackson, fished 22 miles west of New Pass with me on Thursday, 6/30. We used a cravalle jack to lure a goliath onto the line for a fun battle with one that weighed about 350 pounds, which we photographed it in the water and released. Another fun battle was had with an 8-foot sandbar shark that bit a pinfish. As for table-fare, the guys caught two keeper red grouper at 22 inches and 23 inches, which bit baitfish, along with nine keeper lane snapper that bit live shrimp.

                                  Tai Wallace, his ten-year-old son, Xavier, and Tai’s friend, Nick, had planned to fish a full day offshore with me on Saturday, 7/2. But by the half-day mark, the heat was starting to get to Xavier, with water temperature at over 93 degrees, and the air temp about the same. The guys had caught plenty of fish by then, so we decided to call it at the half-day. Using squid for bait 22 miles west of New Pass, the threesome caught three keeper red grouper at 21, 22 and 23 inches. They also caught fifteen keeper-sized lane snapper, and chose to release all but five of those. Added to the fish box were two additional snapper: a keeper yellowtail and a 13-inch mangrove.

                                  You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
                                  http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
                                  Captain Dave Hanson
                                  Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                  Bonita Beach, FL
                                  239 947-1688
                                  fishbuster@comcast.net
                                  http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                                  Comment


                                  • July is almost over, the summer has been flying by. The weather has been
                                    beautiful, with moderate seas anglers are still fishing and getting
                                    hooked up. Before we know it the kids will be back in school.


                                    The Inshore fishing is fantastic all through Palm Beach County. The bait
                                    schools have really made there presence allowing anglers an abundance
                                    of bait to offer Snook, Tarpon, Trout, and big Jacks. Once you locate
                                    bait schools look for predator fish busting baits as signs were to
                                    target game fish.



                                    The Snook fishing in the inlet is fantastic on both sides of the tides.
                                    Live baits have been the man choice for anglers to offer the Snook.
                                    Those who are artificial fanatics a DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait on a
                                    3/8 ounce jig head in bayou tiger gets the linesiders chewing, best
                                    fishing is when the water is moving typically the first of incoming
                                    and last of outgoing great times to fish. The Snook have been
                                    averaging 5 to 30 pounds. Fly fishing anglers snook are smashing
                                    poppers and deceivers around inlets, beaches and mangrove shorelines.
                                    Chumming the snook up can produce plentiful drag screaming action
                                    from sun up to sun down.


                                    Tarpon fishing is great during low light hours but the juvenile tarpon offer
                                    great action for anglers in the ICW along mangrove shore lines, docks
                                    and grass flats. DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait weedless or rigged on a
                                    1/8 ounce jig head in glow and gold fleck and figi chix work great
                                    for tarpon. Key is present bait to rolling fish and stay in front of
                                    the pods. Bigger tarpon are in local inlets striking live sardines
                                    free lined with the tide.



                                    Freshwater peacock bass action is still great, the peacock bass are bedding
                                    allowing for great sight fishing and easy fishing. Live baits, DOA
                                    shrimp, and live shiners all great baits to present to these colorful
                                    beauties. The peacock bass are very aggressive when the sun is over
                                    head, flies like poppers and gurglers provide explosive action.
                                    Typical peacock size is 2 to 3 pounds but many up to 6 pounds not
                                    uncommon.


                                    Well that is the fishing report for the past week hope you all enjoyed.
                                    Remember you cant catch them from the couch so get out there and get
                                    hooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,
                                    PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

                                    Comment


                                    • Monday, 7/11, Mike Kownacki fished the first of two trips he had with me this week. Mike was mostly interested in grouper, so we used live shrimp to catch some baitfish, then caught a couple keeper red grouper, on the baitfish--one 21-inches and one 23-inches. We released a dozen red grouper shorts, fishing 23 miles west of New Pass.

                                      Mike fished with me again on Wednesday morning, 7/13. There weren’t any keeper red grouper that day, though we released twenty red grouper shorts to 19 ½ inches. But the lane snapper were biting on shrimp, and Mike caught twenty-one keeper-sized lanes, boxed six of them for dinner, and released the rest. He also released a 13-inch grunt and a 20-inch Spanish mackerel, 20 miles west of New Pass.

                                      Thursday morning, 7/14, I headed offshore 20 miles with Dustin Reaves and Bill Reed. The guys used squid to catch and release twenty red grouper shorts to 18 inches. The lane snapper were also biting well on squid, and Dustin and Bill caught twenty-five keeper sized lanes, of which they kept six. They also caught five grunts to 14 inches, and chose to keep four of those. As for excitement, they got to battle and released a 4-foot barracuda.

                                      Friday, 7/15, seas weren’t as calm as they had been all week, with a steady 15 knot wind 2o miles west of New Pass. I fished with Brian Kenedy, Sr, his son, Brian Kenedy, Jr., and Brian Jr.’s daughter, Shannon Kenedy. Using shrimp and squid, the family caught 20 red grouper in all, including one keeper at 21 inches, and they released shorts to 19 7/8 inches. They also caught five keeper lane snapper to 15 inches and a half-dozen grunts to 14 inches.

                                      Tuesday morning, 7/19, I fished in Estero Bay’s backwaters with long-time customer Peder Engebretson and his eleven-year-old grandson, John. The guys used shrimp and shiners to catch 25 mangrove snapper, 20 of which were keeper-size, though we released them on this catch-and-release trip. We also released three stingray, and had a line broken off once by something large. We released a couple of catfish too, a by-product of the plentiful rains and fresh water in the bay.

                                      Wednesday, 7/20, Armando Rodriguez and his two sons-in-law, Ross and James, fished offshore with me in spots ranging from 20 to 27 miles west of New Pass, using live shrimp, squid, and baitfish. The guys caught three keeper red grouper, one at 21 inches and two at 22 inches each. They also caught 28 keeper lane snapper to 16 ½ inches and a half dozen grunts to 14 inches. They released lots of red grouper shorts and a few lane shorts.

                                      Thursday morning, 7/21, I headed 22 miles offshore with Frank Fanta and his wife, Heidi. It was Heidi’s first time fishing, and she caught the biggest lane snapper of the eight keeper lanes we boxed, using squid for bait. Hers was 17 inches. The couple added three grunts to the fish box. We probably would have gotten a red grouper or two, if not for being harassed by dolphins at one spot, and by a goliath grouper at another favorite grouper hole. We released two red grouper at 19 ½ inches before the predators began eating our catches!

                                      Long-time customers, Paul Fenwick and son Spencer, joined by friends, John Priddy, daughter Jordan Priddy, and Jordan’s boyfriend, Zak Foster, fished 22 miles west of New Pass with me on Friday morning, 7/22. Using squid, the group caught twenty red grouper, but all were short of the 20-inch mark, so we released those. We did get to box 26 keeper lane snapper though, which will make for plenty of dinner for the two families!

                                      Saturday morning, 7/23, I fished a catch-and-release trip in Estero Bay with Kris Outman, his son, Jack Henry, and daughter, Emerson. The family used shrimp and shiners for bait, and released seven mangrove snapper, a sheepshead, five stingray to 3 pounds and, after a mighty battle, a ten-pound crevalle jack. A manatee swam up to the boat, and it was trailing bunch of fishing line with sea grass tangled in it, so we managed to get it all untangled, and it swam off happy and unencumbered. This is one reason that it is so important for anglers to dispose of their fishing line appropriately.

                                      The photo shown is of angler Kris Outman with a 10-pouind crevalle jack, caught on a shiner, fought hard, and released in Estero Bay on an inshore trip 7/23/16.
                                      Click image for larger version

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                                      You can check out all of our shark and goliath grouper action videos at the following link:
                                      http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
                                      Captain Dave Hanson
                                      Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                      Bonita Beach, FL
                                      239 947-1688
                                      fishbuster@comcast.net
                                      http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                                      Comment


                                      • August is closing in and the kids will be back to school soon. The weather
                                        has been very hot and very little rain for my area but the fishing
                                        continuous to produce great action.


                                        The Inshore fishing has been full of action for anglers targeting Snook.
                                        The Snook continue to gather in our inlets and deep channels.
                                        Anglers are catching double digit numbers of the Snook averaging 10
                                        to 25 pounds. Live baits worked on the bottom will produce strikes
                                        but catching snook on artificial lures is more gratifying and takes
                                        much more skills set. DOA Lures like DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait and
                                        DOA C.A.L. 5.5 jerk bait on a jig 3/8 ounce jig head in bayou tiger
                                        or glow and gold rush belly produce big fish and steady action. Snook
                                        action is great around mangrove shorelines on the falling tide, top
                                        water plugs and DOA shrimp or DOA C.A.L. weedless produces great
                                        results.



                                        The Tarpon action has been great on the beach and inside the ICW for
                                        anglers looking to tango with the silver king. Look for rolling fish
                                        and present a live bait or jig in the area were fish are rolling. The
                                        Tarpon have ranged in size from 10 to 70 pounds. Always remember to
                                        bow down while a Tarpon is jumping to avoid the break offs and hooks
                                        pulling out. Live baits free lined along channel edges and along
                                        docks and mangrove edges also great tactics to hook the silver king.
                                        Top water plugs and DOA C.A.L. 4 Inch Jerk baits in pearl or
                                        holographic entice many tarpon to feed.


                                        The Docks and seawalls have provided great action for anglers using jigs
                                        and live baits. The Jacks, Snapper and a few Trout have been the main
                                        predators being caught. These fish have been ambushing bait schools
                                        as they look for shelter. Early morning and late afternoon has
                                        provided the best bite.


                                        Peacock action has been outstanding and anglers are enjoying not stop action
                                        whether using shiners, artificial lures or fly. The peacocks are very
                                        aggressive from sun up to sun down and the sight fishing for these
                                        colorful beauties, will get your heart pounding. Sight casing to
                                        peacock bass on beds and along shorelines gets anglers very excited
                                        and becomes an addiction once they feel and see the power of these
                                        vibrant species.


                                        Well that is the report for the past week hope you all enjoyed. Remember
                                        you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and get hooked
                                        up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski, PhlatsInshoreFishing.com,
                                        561-644-4371

                                        Comment


                                        • August well known for providing scorching heat and plenty of humidity. The
                                          tropical breeze has been our only savor. Fishing early morning has
                                          given anglers calm conditions, avoiding afternoon thunder storms.
                                          With school starting up next week, the waters will have less traffic
                                          for the serous fisherman.


                                          The Inshore fishing has provided plenty of action for anglers targeting
                                          Snook. The Snook continue to gather in our local inlets and deep
                                          channels. Anglers hooking up with the linesiders averaging 5 to 25
                                          pounds are enjoying catch and release trophy snook. Live baits
                                          dropped to the bottom produce fish but a DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait
                                          in glow / gold rush belly and bayou tiger provide the best results.
                                          Working the DOA C.A.L's along the bottom with current is more
                                          gratifying then soaking a live bait on the bottom and sure puts a
                                          smile on the anglers face when they feel the strike.


                                          The Tarpon action has been great inside the inlets and in the ICW.
                                          Anglers looking to tango with the silver king, scan the waters
                                          surface for rolling fish. Once the tarpon are located, present a live
                                          greenies or pinfish in there vicinity. DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk bait on
                                          a ¼ ponce jig head in Arkansas glow and glow holographic, great
                                          colors to present to rolling fish. The Tarpon have ranged in size
                                          from 10 to 50 pounds. Always remember to bow down while a Tarpon is
                                          jumping, this helps to avoid break offs and hooks pulling out.


                                          The Docks and seawalls have provided great action for anglers using top
                                          water heddon spooks, a slow walk the dog retrieve provides explosive
                                          top water strikes. Live thread fins soaked around structure will
                                          provide many hook ups for anglers. The Jacks, Snapper and a few Trout
                                          have been the main predators being caught along the grass flats and
                                          channel edges. These fish have been ambushing bait schools as they
                                          look for shelter. Early morning and late afternoon has provided the
                                          best bite.


                                          Freshwater action peacock bass have been the main target and the bite has been
                                          great. Fly anglers are enjoying top water strikes on popper flies,
                                          nothing beats a surface strike. Peacocks are very aggressive so any
                                          hard bait or soft plastic worked along shorelines, bridges and docks
                                          will provide hook ups. Live shiners are another choice for anglers,
                                          they are expensive but they always get the job done. Sight casting to
                                          peacock bass is a blast, DOA shrimp in copper crush or fire tiger my
                                          go to lure. Present the DOA shrimp in the peacock bass vicinity and
                                          game on.


                                          Well that is the report for the past week hope you all enjoyed. Remember
                                          you cant catch the form the couch so get out there and get hooked up.
                                          Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski, PhlatsInshoreFishing.com,
                                          561-644-4371

                                          Comment

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