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  • #41
    SW FL-Bonita Beach: 24 lb. cobia, goliaths, snapper, Sp

    I fished 17 miles out of New Pass on Thursday, 8/23, with Paul Fenwick, Pamela Harden, Chris Dicon, John Priddy and Jackie Myers. We caught seven keeper mangrove snapper, a few Spanish mackerel and porgies, and released two goliath grouper each about 20 pounds before we hit the jackpot with a 24 pound cobia. We had hooked a small remora on a shrimp, and the cobia was hanging around trying to eat the shrimp protruding from the remora’s mouth (cobia tend to swim with remora.) With a little coaxing, the cobia swam boat-side. I grabbed my gaff, and hitting it lucky, got the fish dead-on. A green cobia is notorious for its power and ability to tear up everything in the boat, and I was prepared for the worst, but I was lucky--the way the gaff caught him, he didn’t even wiggle. (see photo)

    Friday, fishing in 35-42 feet out of New Pass with Joe Lester, Paul Schaffer, and brothers Joe and John Berra, we released most of what we caught, except a few nice snapper for the group’s dinner. We caught lane snapper, mangrove snapper, a small hogfish, red grouper shorts to 18 ½ inches, triggerfish, porkfish, whitebone porgies and lots of ladyfish. A couple anglers had a couple of nice Spanish mackerel hooked, but they got their lines wrapped around each other and broke those off. We had a goliath try to eat one of our snappers on the way up, so we tossed the snapper back out for bait and released a 25 pound goliath. We were broken off by a larger goliath a while later. The water temperature was hot—91.1 degrees.
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

    Comment


    • #42
      Inshore Fishing Report August 24, 2007 Palm Beach / Jup

      “The Spawn is on”. The Snook spawn in Jupiter and Palm Beach has been full force the past few weeks. The bite has been excellent on both side of the tides. The Snook are taking both live baits and artificial baits. Live bait produces more bites, with croakers and live greenies being the bait of choice. The Snook have been averaging 10 to 25 pounds. The beaches have also produced great action for Snook. The Snook have been very active early and late in the evening hanging near the shore break. Small jigs and crank baits will produce many fish along with live bait if that’s your choice. Mixed in along the beaches with the snook have been pods of tarpon. These fish are ranging in the 40 to 90 pound class. The best way to catch these monsters is to get in front of them pitch a live bait out, stay quit, and hang on. Remember when targeting these fish take care of the fish when handling and please do not use the lightest tackle possible. I like to use a Spherous 5000 reel with a medium heavy rod lined with 30 pound Power Pro with 40 pound leader and a 4/0 circle hook. Power Pro works great when fishing the inlets do to it abrasion resistance towards the rocks and barnacles, these big Snook like to try and break you off on. The braid is also very sensitive and helps you feel everything the bait is doing.

      The bite inside has been steady but water temperatures are very warm. Fishing early in the morning and late in the afternoon has been the ticket do to the water temps being cooler producing Snook, Tarpon, Jacks and Snapper. The last of the out going and first of the incoming is the best times for the tarpon. Live bait produces the most bites using greenies and sand perch. Small jigs and storm baits will also produce fish .

      The fresh water bite has been excellent for peacock bass, these fish are schooling up and will destroy a live shiner put in front of them. Small flies and small jigs will also produce numerous catches. These fish are averaging 2 to 5 pounds. The largemouth bass have been active also. Early morning and late afternoon produces the most strikes do to the cooler temps. Small crank baits and small jigs work best for these fish along with live shiners.

      Well that is the report for the past few weeks. If you would like to experience light tackle fishing at its best for any of the above mentioned species, give Capt. Craig Korczynski a call 561-644-4371. Or visit me at www.PhlatsInshoreFishing.com. Phlats1519@yahoo.com. I would like to thank Power Pro and www.AtonSolutions.com for there support.
      Capt. Craig Korczynski
      Phlats Guide Services
      Light Tackle Inshore Fishing Jupiter/ Palm Beach
      www.PhlatsInshoreFishing.com
      561-644-4371

      Comment


      • #43
        South Indian River Fishing Report

        August 23, 2007

        Inshore:

        Dog Days of summer are upon us still and it's been hot around the Treasure Coast this week. Getting out early or late in the day offers the best opportunities to fish and a little comfort to go along, too. Fishing has continued to be productive for those early birds on the water.

        Trout and snapper has been the best bite along the river this week. I had Tyler Serio, Chad Merrill and Jason Horn on the boat Sunday for the first Teen Anglers Tournament. While the big fish evaded us, they caught a number of trout, snapper, look-downs and a variety of fish for the day. It was a great day of fishing for the guys. I always look forward to the tournaments and taking the guys out. All three of them were awarded trophies for their catch.




        Jason Horn weighing in his trout and Tyler Serio with a Lookdown he caught...

        The not hard to find the secret to fishing in the heat of summer. Look for the bait schools and you should find fish hanging around them. Snook, redfish and trout have been chasing the bait in the wee hours of the mornings and a good top water lure can get you a strike. Vary the way you work your lures until you get that hit and keep working it around the bait. Once the sun rises, switch to a suspending lure or live bait on a popping cork. The trout have been hitting mostly in the mornings, but you can still get a few to bite around the bait schools. There has been a good bite down towards the Power Plant and up north from Queen's Cove to Round Island.




        First light in Fort Pierce and trout fishing at dawn....

        Snapper have continued to bite along the channel edges with live or dead shrimp. Fishing around structure on the bottom can get you a good mess for dinner. There have also been sheephead and black drum hanging in the same areas. Use small hooks to have the best chance for them. We have had success on both tides. I heard from several anglers who have had some good luck this past week catching some nice snapper.

        Snook have been on the flats in the early hours chasing bait. Also look for snook and redfish to be lurking along the docks south of Fort Pierce. Lots of other fish around the river this time of year. We have been catching jacks, ladyfish, look-downs, barracuda and variety of other species that have invaded the river in search of a meal.

        Tip of the Week:

        Snook season open September 1st and is almost here already. It's a good time to check things and make sure you are ready for it. With the new regulations in effect, make sure you have something to measure your fish. Have you checked your snook stamp? Might just be time to do that, too. A lot of snook fishing gear isn't used as much during the off season, so it's time to check your rods, reels and line. It's usually pretty busy around the bait shops, ramps and inlets that first week. Make your plans and include alternate fishing spots if your favorite haunt is taken when you head out. It can get crowded, so a little patience, friendliness and awareness can help make for a fun experience.....hopefully a successful one, too!

        As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

        Good Fishing and Be Safe,
        Captain Charlie Conner
        www.fishtalescharter.com

        email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

        772-284-3852

        Comment


        • #44
          Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishihg Forecast

          Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, September 2007

          Complements of Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka, Florida

          Season of the Mullet

          As the tropical storm season wanes along the Indian River Lagoon Coast of Florida, we welcome the arrival of September with hot and humid days, and than say good by to the summer as September exits on the shoulders of a prevailing northeast wind. Shorter days, longer nights and the prevailing shift is the winds and swells signal the end of summer, and the beginning of the season of the mullet.

          I’m often asked the question, “When is the best time to fish on the east coast of Florida?” and the answer has arrived with the season of the mullet. Like many of the 700 plus species of fish that frequent the IRL throughout the year, silver mullet gradually return to our estuary in the spring, and then form up for a mass exodus once the water begins to cool. As the bait schools begin to form up, larger predators know it is once again time to fatten up for winter’s arrival.

          As schools of bait move out of the inlets and south down the beach, they move in pulses rather than a continuous flow, so as always, locating bait is the key to success. Bait pods are easily located by watching for diving birds and fish working them on the surface just inside the breakers. Look for snook, tarpon, redfish, bluefish, jack crevalle, Spanish mackerel, sharks, and large kingfish crushing and shadowing bait pods all along the beach. Once you’ve located the bait concentration, simply determine its direction of movement, usually south, and set up in front of it and let them come to you. This is also my preferred time of year to target tarpon and snook in the surf.

          The beach snook run has already started with a few fish being reported, and it will pick up substantially, just in time for the opening of snook season on September 1st. When fishing from the beach, I prefer using live finger mullet as bait, matching the run. Fish the very edge of the beach, just beyond the whitewater, and walk along the beach letting your bait drift along in the direction of tidal flow. My rig consist of a #3 Daiichi Bleeding Bait circle hook, a one ounce barrel sinker, and a 24” section of 40-pound test fluorocarbon leader. I also prefer to use 20-pound test braided high-vis Courtland line to improve sensitivity and avoid line twist. First, slide the barrel sinker onto the terminal end of your braided line, and then splice in the leader, the knot will allow the sinker to slide freely up the braided line, keeping it off of the leader and the hook. This technique will allow bait to cover more ground and help keep your bait in the strike zone longer. Make sure your reel has the strength and line capacity to handle a large fish, so you don’t get spooled.

          Outside in the deeper water, good numbers of kingfish will continue to work the beaches, Port Canaveral buoy line, and the inshore reefs and wrecks in 70 to 120 feet of water. When targeting kingfish my preferred method is slow trolling live pogies (Atlantic menhaden) on stainless steel stinger rigs. Also as the water temperatures cool, look for the large manta rays to move into shallower water bringing cobia with them. In Port Canaveral and Sebastian Inlet look for flounder, mangrove snapper, large redfish and snook around the jetties and other structures, and tripletail, barracuda, and cobia under the Canaveral buoy cans.

          Inshore, the sea trout bite on top water plugs will increase along the deeper edges of the grass flats, with the best bite happening at first light and sunset. Also look for ladyfish, tarpon, and jacks to be mixed in. When targeting these fish, work top water plugs for explosive action, or try working ¼ ounce jigs with a white or rootbeer colored RipTide Realistic Shrimp combined with a Woodies Rattle capsule inserted. Near the end of the month, start looking for the pompano and flounder to begin moving out of the lagoon through the inlets into the near shore waters along the beach. Also watch for the larger redfish to begin forming up just outside Sebastian and Ponce De Leon Inlets to spawn, and feeding on small baitfish, mullet, and small blue crabs washing out with the tide.

          Seminars and Events:

          September 2nd 8am –12pm Rodney Smith’s Surf Fishing Tour
          Port Canaveral to Satellite Beach
          www.coastalanglermagazine.com

          September 8th 10am – 4pm Coleman Tailgate Event
          Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida
          Information and directions 407-464-2000

          September 22nd 2pm to 6pm Rodney Smith’s Fishing Land Tour
          Longpoint to Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge
          www.coastalanglermagazine.com

          September 29th 10am – 3pm Ladies Social Angler Seminar
          Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida
          Registration and Information 407-464-2000 or
          www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com

          As always, if you have questions or need information, please contact me.

          Good luck and good fishing,

          Captain Tom Van Horn
          Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters
          www.irl-fishing.com
          captain@irl-fishing.com
          407-366-8085 landline
          407-416-1187 on the water
          866-790-8081 toll free


          Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins!

          If you would like to be added to this Internet fishing report mailing list, just reply to this message or contact me at captain@irl-fishing.com.

          Comment


          • #45
            Snook Season Opens Tonight On The Treasure Coast!

            August 31, 2007

            Inshore:

            SNOOK SEASON OPENS TONIGHT! There are a lot of eager anglers waiting for the stroke of midnight to get out in search of a slot size snook tonight. The inlets have been holding lots of linesiders and tonight will give many the opportunity of a keeper snook. You can expect this weekend to be a very busy time on the water. Tournaments happening, snook season opening, Labor Day Weekend....etc....etc.....will make the ramps and channels overly busy with boat traffic. Be prepared for a wait at the ramp and take extra caution to watch for potential boat hazards all over the area. Have a safe and successful Labor Day Weekend!



            Trout fishing continues to be productive on the river....

            Trout have continued to be the fish to target on the river these days. Early mornings on top water and switching to live bait once the sun rises over the shoreline can give you the best chance at a hookup. Lots of reports of smaller trout this week, but there are still some slobs out there. Largest I managed over the weekend was 23" on a jerk bait. The Power Plant has continued to bring good catches to those heading south of Fort Pierce and from Queen's Cove to Round Island to the north.



            Slot size snook will be the target for September....

            Snapper have been biting along the channel edges and also on the flats. I caught several keepers in the shallow water, but most have come from the channels. There are some nice size snapper in the river and live or dead shrimp have worked well out there. Most reports I have had are to the north of Fort Pierce.

            Redfish have been scattered with the hotter water on the flats this month. I did manage to scare a school that was in shallow water at first light, but they hustled off the flats in a hurry. I would suggest trying the docks along the west shoreline to try for a redfish this time of year. As the water begins to cool off, look for them to get more active on the flats.

            Bridge and jetty anglers have been catching snapper, sheephead and a few flounder. The river continues to be loaded with ladyfish and jacks out looking for a meal. It's a great time with the kids this time of year. The fall mullet run is just around the corner and look for lots of action as the bait schools begin their parade along the Treasure Coast. The river and beach will be alive with mullet and all the things that love to eat them!

            Tip of the Week:

            Holiday weekends can be frustrating and trying times if you don't plan your trip on the water. Make sure your boat is running prior to heading off to the water. Get your boat prepped before you back into the ramp. Ramp time should always be minimized to allow other boats to get launched in short time. If you launch early, like I do, turn your headlights off when backing down the ramp. It allows the boater on the ramp next to you to launch without headlights glaring in his mirrors. Be prepared to a long line of anxious boaters and patience, wisdom and a little preparation will help make your holiday weekend a fun and safe experience! Happy Labor Day!

            As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

            Good Fishing and Be Safe,
            Captain Charlie Conner
            www.fishtalescharter.com

            email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

            772-284-3852

            Comment


            • #46
              SW FL-Bonita Beach: Finally a keeper gag grouper! Golia

              Friday, 8/31, I fished an outgoing tide in Estero Bay around Wiggins Pass with Tom and Marsha Lynch. We caught a few keeper mangrove snapper to 12 inches and released a 19 inch snook, cravalle jacks and ladyfish.

              Saturday, 9/1, I fished with a husband-and-wife team who were actually both named Terry--Terry & Terry Lunsford and their friends Mel and Linda Vaughn. We headed out to about 32 feet out of New Pass, where we did pretty well with live shrimp. We caught a 23 inch keeper gag grouper, the first one of those in a good while this close in. We also caught 14 keeper mangrove snapper to 13 inches and some porgies. We released a small hogfish and a 14 inch mutton snapper. Then, for some sport and excitement, we targeted goliath grouper with blue runners and cravalle jacks as bait. We released three goliaths, one that appeared to be over 15o pounds, one about 70 pounds and one about 50 pounds. All in all it was a hot, but good morning of fishing for fun and food.

              The photo shown is of angler Stacy Madson with a trio of hogfish, caught on shrimp on a recent offshore trip.
              Captain Dave Hanson
              Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
              Bonita Beach, FL
              239 947-1688
              fishbuster@comcast.net
              http://www.fishbustercharters.com

              Comment


              • #47
                Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Report

                Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Report, September 6, 2007

                Complements of Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida

                Let the Feeding Frenzy Commence

                Yesterday as the sun settled in the west, I found myself at the ocean’s edge. My quest was not to catch fish for I carried no tackle, but to simply observe conditions in anticipation of the arrival of the mullet. With a low-pressure system building in the Atlantic northeast of Florida and the northeasterly breezes and seas building, conditions are right for the commencement of the mullet run.

                As I sat there scanning the water with my toes burred in the sand, I caught a glimpse of a large splash out of the corner of my eye. Was it a large tarpon or maybe a spinner shark? My anticipation grew. Soon I spotted what I was hoping to see as another large tarpon exploded on a school of silver mullet pushing south about 100 yards offshore. As the darkness grew more and more bait pods pushed to the surface hounded by hungry tarpon and spinner sharks. Further out I watch as terns feverishly worked schools of glass minnows pushed to the surface by Spanish mackerel. Clearly the bait run has started, and soon the beach and inlets will be teaming with bait and hungry fish. Currently, heavy ocean conditions will make fishing from a boat challenging, but once the seas begin to settle the bite should be on fire.

                On the inside today I spent the better part of the afternoon poling my Old Town canoe along the western shoreline of the Banana River No-Motor Zone looking for signs of the fall bait run. Gusty winds and recent rainfall have muddied the water making sight fishing difficult.

                As I poled along the flat I would run over the fish before I’d see them, so I adjusted my strategy with a decision to try a new soft plastic bait. In the distance I could see redfish pushing and moving about, so I decided to try retrieving the new Exude 2 ½ inch Fan Tailed Shrimp in the Golden Bream color across the surface of the water. I would make a long cast well past my target, and with my rod tip raised high, I would reel the bait at a steady speed just fast enough to keep it fluttering on top. The fan Tail Shrimp comes with a glass rattle, which inserts into a pocket in the tail of the bait, but the rattle was gone after the first fish. I have done well using this tactic before, and once again it rewarded me with 8 redfish and about a dozen missed fish. After my pack of Exudes were gone, I switched to my trusted RipTide frog, and again received explosive results from I believe to be snook at the very edge of the matted widgeon grass. If you try this tactic, keep your rod tip high, and at the moment of the strike, through your rod tip forward giving the fish some slack and a chance to take the bait. The hook I was using was a #3 Daiichi Copper Head with the barb smashed.

                Tip of the Week

                A recent study showed a thirty percent mortality for catch and release sea trout. These fish expire after release from injuries and miss handling. With this thought in mind, it is extremely important keep you fish in the water as much as possible, touch them as little as possible, and mash the barbs on your hooks, especially gang hooks, Mashed barbs will facilitate an easy release with less injury. Barbs on hook do not catch fish; tight lines catch fish.

                Seminars and Events:

                September 8th 10am – 4pm Coleman Tailgate Event
                Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida
                Information and directions 407-464-2000


                September 29th 10am – 3pm Ladies Social Angler Seminar
                Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida
                Registration is limited call 407-464-2000 or go to
                www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com

                As always, if you have questions or need information, please contact me.

                Good luck and good fishing,

                Captain Tom Van Horn
                Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters
                www.irl-fishing.com
                captain@irl-fishing.com
                407-366-8085 landline
                407-416-1187 on the water
                866-790-8081 toll free


                Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins!

                If you would like to be added to this Internet fishing report mailing list, just reply to this message or contact me at captain@irl-fishing.com.

                Comment


                • #48
                  South Indian River Fishing Report

                  September 6, 2007

                  Inshore:

                  A little cooler weather has eased up some of the heat on the Treasure Coast this week. Along with some afternoon showers, it has helped cool off the water temperatures on the flats. You can see the first signs of the mullet invading the river to begin the fall mullet run along the eastern Florida. It's a great time of year to fish the Indian River!

                  Most weeks, lately, it has been a trout and snapper report. I was on the water today fishing the shallow waters of the north of Fort Pierce. As I saw a flash in front of the boat, I looked out on a nice sized school of healthy redfish working their way across the flats. All were in the upper slot range and with one cast, I had on a 27" bundle of angry fish. The whole school lingered around while I fought the red and there were even several that continued to swim next to the hooked fish as it neared the boat. The redfish are back on the flats!



                  Redfish action on the flats this week....

                  Trout fishing has continued to be most productive in the early mornings on top water or live bait on a float. Look for them to stay on the deeper edges of the flats for now, but they will begin to head up in the shallows once the mullet are in the river. As the water temps lower a bit, the trout will spend more time on the flats.



                  The end of a battle, released to fight another day....

                  Snook fishing has been good for the night anglers around the bridges, jetties and docks. Most have been shorts and some nice over-slots have been taken. It's been a challenge to get in the slot so far this season for a lot of anglers. Early mornings on the flats will find snook feeding at first light and a top water lure can get a strike. Large shrimp or live bait works well around the bridges and jetties.

                  There are still snapper, jacks and ladyfish being caught around the river. Hit the channel edges for snapper. Jacks and ladyfish are all around the river this time of year. Look for things to heat up as the mullet continue to filter their way into the river. It's time to get out the cast net and be ready for some great fishing action!

                  Tip of the Week:

                  I fish a lot of soft baits on the flats. One thing that I do to keep my baits hopping along the grass is to hold the rod tip high while popping my baits up over the grass. Use short twitches to work the bait slowly along the bottom. I like to use CAL jigs on my soft baits and if you use short, sharp pops with your rod tip high, it will keep the bait jumping up before settling back on the bottom. If you practice, you will seldom pick up grass as you fish the flats. You can use weedless set ups also and use the same technique to work your lure.

                  As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                  Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                  Captain Charlie Conner
                  www.fishtalescharter.com

                  email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                  772-284-3852

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island Fishing Reports

                    1st Palce Prize Winning Report
                    The Fall Mullet Run

                    It looks to me like the fall mullet run has been underway for about a week now. When the finger mullet show up in the surf and in the rivers you can be sure the fishing action is about to improve. In my last report I described the fishing like a roller coaster, up one day and down the next. With the mullet showing up we should be up most of the time for a while now. It’s the time of the year anglers wait for because the predators will be following closely behind and the fishing should get great.



                    The Port and the Nearshore Ocean should produce some good redfish and snook action along with all the other predators that will be following the mullet. Some reports of tarpon to the north, suggests that these bruisers will be down our way soon. Use your cast net to fill the well with mullet and you are on your way. Rig up with a Diiachi Bleeding Bait circle hook and free line those mullet in the surf along the beach and also around the jetties. Beef up that rod to at least a 20 pound class and use a 40 pound leader. If you get into the tarpon take that leader on up to at least 60 pounds and bigger than that if the fish go over 100. With the 20 pound rods and the appropriate leader you will be able to shorten the fight and improve the chances of a strong live release.

                    On my last two trips on the Banana River we were greeted with high winds from the get go. The first trip resulted in only one fish after a lot of looking and casting. The one red we picked up came on a 5 inch Rip Tide Flats Grub in the glow color. The grub was rigged on a 1/4 oz. Pro Jig head from Rip Tide. The nice 23 inch red was lying up close to the mangroves on a small spoil island. Anytime you can find this situation with some deeper water nearby chances are good there are some fish around.



                    The next trip was also a windy day. I was joined by John from Chicago for the days fishing. John started the morning casting topwater lures hoping for a snook. After fishing a couple different points without success we changed over to a small subsurface lure in a white color. It wasn’t long until a small juvenile tarpon took the bait. Unfortunately, one jump and he was gone. At least it got us pumped a little because we had fished an hour without success. Soon we had a pole bending jack for a little more action.

                    The bite was slow on artificial so we decide to try some live shrimp. The shrimp produced more jacks, some nice mangrove snapper, and several small reds. The largest red was 21 inches. The wind continued to blow hard and by the time we called it a day we ran though large waves and a couple of rain showers getting back to the ramp.

                    As always, you can visit my website at www.inshorefishingadventures.com to view pictures of the fish we catch in the Cocoa Beach area. That’s what it’s all about. Good fishin’.
                    Last edited by administrator; 09-18-2007, 11:03 PM. Reason: add pictures

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Inshore Fishing Report September 11, 2007 Palm Beach /

                      Inshore Fishing Report September 11, 2007 Palm Beach / Jupiter


                      Let me start off by saying summer has flown by pretty fast. The fall is upon us and that means “Mullet Run Time”. We have already gotten pods of mullet passing through the past few weeks. This has turned the fishing up inside. The Tarpon Snook, and Jacks have been going nuts all through the Lake Worth lagoon. The best times have been morning, evening, and nighttime do to the water temperatures dropping as the sunsets.

                      Snook season is back open, September first was opening day and I have only managed one slot sized Snook with the new regulations. Most of the Snook caught are over the slot or just under the twenty-eight inch mark. Most of the Snook have been following bait pods near docks and sea walls. Live bait is the key but during the early morning and evening hours jigs and top water baits will produce many hook ups.

                      The Tarpon action has been hot the past week and these fish are everywhere. Many off the Tarpon are in small pods both incoming and outgoing produce fish. Free lining live bait will get there attention but for those who like to throw lures, small top dogs and spooks will work along with storm baits. The average size of the Tarpon is 5 to 20 lbs. The Jacks have also been around in full force exploding on any bait that moves near there vicinity. The Jacks are ranging form 2 to 15 lbs. The snapper bite and sheepshead bite has been good also with many of these fish taken near the docks and sea walls

                      The freshwater bite has slowed do the water clarity. The water has been chocolate brown the past week because off all the rain and the back pumping form the engineers thanks.
                      There are fish around the key has been to find cleaner water and fish early in the morning or late in the evening. The largemouth bass have been taking finesse worms and small crank baits, The peacock bas bite has slowed tremendously and I don’t expect it to pick back up until the water clarity cleans up which could be a while.

                      Well that is the fishing report for the past few weeks if you would like to experience light tackle inshore fishing for any of the above-mentioned species give Capt. Craig Korczynski a call at 561-644-4371. Or visit www.PhlatsInshoreFishing.com,or email me at phlats1519@yahoo.com. I would like to thank PowerPro.com and www.AtonSolutions.com for there support
                      Capt. Craig Korczynski
                      Phlats Guide Services
                      Light Tackle Inshore Fishing Jupiter/ Palm Beach
                      www.PhlatsInshoreFishing.com
                      561-644-4371

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Apalachicola Inshore and Offshore fishing

                        September Inshore & Offshore fishing PredictionsBy: Sandra Allen
                        Book Me A Charter

                        September’s cooler weather is on the way and finally a little break from the blistering summer heat wave. When the nights starts cooling- the inshore fishing starts heating up for the fall fishing season.

                        Some of our homeowner friends from St. George Island and Cape San Blas have beautiful 1, 2 and 3 bedroom units open and ready for our fishing buddies. If you are looking to get away for a weekend or spend a nice relaxing week of fishing and lounging on our secluded beaches- this is the time of year to do it. Rental rates are lower and the weather is normally cooler this time of year. Give us a call if you see that you may be able to sneak away for a couple of days or a week or two and enjoy our beautiful fall season mixed with wonderful fall fishing.

                        Now, to the Fishing Report……

                        Inshore… We have been catching some really nice inshore species of fish and expect it to only get better as the season progresses. September, October and November are prime fall fishing months for schooling Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder and Drum. Fall fishing is always some of the best fishing in the year. Our nights are getting longer and cooler thus the water temperatures are dropping. Anyone who knows fishing, knows that this combination is what triggers fish to do their thing.

                        Cooling waters create hungry fish!
                        We do offer flounder gigging charters on the Apalachicola Bay. We will be targeting flounder on their fall run starting mid September through October depending on the weather and water temperatures. Look for some fantastic fall flounder gigging charters!


                        Offshore... We have been catching some really big Red Snapper, Red Grouper, King Mackerel and Cobia. Our captains are reporting good offshore fishing in water 45-100 ft. in depth, from 6-20 miles offshore. We expect good offshore fishing to continue through the fall season. Remember Recreational Snapper season closes October 31…

                        Of course many of you have already called and reserved your boats for the upcoming season. We really appreciate the fact that you took heed in our earlier fishing reports and reserved early. At this time we do have days open, but we don’t expect our guides to be open long. Call or email us for availability or to reserve one of our native guides.



                        If you’re looking for experienced, family friendly, native guides give us a call 850-653-2622 or drop us an email info@BookMeACharter.com

                        We’d love to take you fishing in our back yard!

                        Sandra Allen
                        Book Me A Charter
                        Tour and Fishing Guide Services
                        Apalachicola, FL
                        850-653-2622
                        www.BookMeACharter.com
                        info@BookMeACharter.com

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          South Indian River Fishing Report

                          Favorable Mention Report
                          September 13, 2007

                          Inshore:

                          Another beautiful week of nice weather on the Treasure Coast has provided some great fishing opportunities on the Indian River. Tides have been running higher than normal this week, allowing anglers to fish areas that are usually too shallow for most boats. The water has remained fairly clean to the north of Fort Pierce, even with the showers we have received this week. South of Fort Pierce has been clear and the mullet have invaded the river. Fish the bait and you will find the action!



                          Terry with a nice 22" trout caught on the flats....

                          Trout has continued to be very productive in the early mornings on soft baits, top water or live shrimp. Get out early for the best action. Fish the shallow grass flats first and move to the deeper edges once the sun rises. Mike Smith and his friend, Terry, were out with me over the weekend and we got into some nice trout action in the early morning. They caught two over slot trout, but Terry had a huge gator trout explode on his top water, only to miss. I was out scouting a couple days this week and landed a 27" to top off the day. Harbor Branch and Bear Point have been good to us most days out there.



                          A 27" gator trout caught on soft baits this week....

                          Snook fishing has been good at night along the inlet, docks and bridges. Not many slot size reported, but many shorts and some over-size snook were reported. Live bait is the first choice. Large shrimp, when available, or live mullet will do the trick. Don't forget to give the surf a try this time of year. Lots of snook will be patrolling the beaches while chasing the mullet.



                          Early morning on the water - 9/11/2007....a double rainbow!

                          Not a lot of redfish reports this week. They were on the flats the week prior, but evaded us this week. I will be after them again next week! With all the mullet filtering into the river, look for the action on the flats to continue to heat up next week!

                          Hoards of ladyfish and jacks are chasing bait all over the river. Some nice size jacks are out there to keep your rod bent. It's a great time of year to fish the Indian River. Still lots of snapper on the channel edges to keep you busy. Plan a trip on the water soon.....

                          Tip of the Week:

                          With all the bait in the river, it's a great time to drift the flats in the early mornings. It's always a good idea to use the tides and winds to your advantage when fishing the flats. Set yourself up to drift across your favorite fishing area to let the winds and tide move you silently across it. I always carry a small bell anchor along to drop over the side if I want to stop in any area to fish it, before drifting along again. You can use a zigzag pattern to fish flats by drifting and moving back for another drift along a different path. It works well for early mornings on the flats.

                          As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                          Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                          Captain Charlie Conner
                          www.fishtalescharter.com

                          email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                          772-284-3852

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island Fishing Report

                            Road Trip

                            You can probably tell from the title, this report is not about fishing Cocoa Beach and Merritt Island but about a recent road trip to Homosassa for the Florida Outdoor Writers Annual Convention. If you are like me you like to get away from home once in a while and fish some other areas. Homosassa provides the perfect spot to do so.

                            It is a beautiful area for fishing and sightseeing as well. Homosassa is home to the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, a wonder in itself. A 1.1 mile trail of paving and boardwalks puts you in touch with Hippo’s, Alligators, Bobcats, Cougar, Manatees, and more. The underwater observatory gives you excellent views of snook, redfish, sheepshead, snappers, and other fishes in their natural environment. With all the educational programs they offer you could spend a day in the park learning about nature and wildlife. You can even dine at the Wildlife Café located in the park.



                            There are plenty of other things to do in the area but we better get to the fishing. I went a day before the conference so I could do a little extra fishing. I hooked up with Capt. Don Chancey for some redfish action. Don operates Grouper Hunter/ Flats Chance Charters and specializes in Grouper, Trout, Redfish, and Cobia. You can reach him at 352-303-9399. I called him and ask about a morning charter. He said fine, lets start about noon. You guessed it, the tides are all important in that area and since we were going after redfish he wanted to fish the incoming tide and a 12:00 noon departure would give us the needed conditions.

                            We ran out towards the Gulf of Mexico in the little Homosassa River. Capt. Don mentioned what many others had told me in the past. When running these waters be very careful to stay in the marked channels. There are lots of rocks and many lower units have been damaged by unsuspecting boaters. It wasn’t long until the characteristics of the river faded and the environment turned into rocky mangrove islands all of which looked fishy to me.

                            Capt. Don explained that as the tide comes up over the rocks and fills the voids under the mangroves the redfish follow the rising water to feed. We fished rocky points and edges of mangroves using shrimp and cut mullet. Light tackle spinning rods were rigged with about 18 inches of leader and a 3/0 circle hook. A small split shot was added just above the hook for added casting distance.

                            By the end of the day we had wrestled about 8 feisty redfish to the boat, the largest measured in at 26.5 inches. The color of the redfish were something to behold. The last red I caught in the Banana River was nearly silver but these Homosassa reds were a bright beautiful bronze, as if they had been working on their tan all summer.

                            Well, I gotta’ go for now but my next report will be about the fishing tournament held at the writers conference. The tournament was scheduled in the morning and the tides would not be the ones the guides wanted. Tune in next time to read about the results.

                            As always, you can visit my website at www.inshorefishingadventures.com to view pictures of the fish we catch in the Cocoa Beach area. That's what it's all about. Good fishin'.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              South Indian River Fishing Report

                              September 20, 2007

                              Inshore:

                              Other than some daily thunderstorms that have loomed over the Treasure Coast, the fishing has been good out on the river. Some breaks in the daily routine of rain, have provided a mixed bag of fish for anglers braving the conditions. Mullet are all over the river now and the predators are all out there giving chase. It's not hard to find fish....just watch for nervous or excited bait schools and you can find fish hanging around them.




                              Eva with trout and bluefish to begin a morning on the water....

                              I managed a couple days on the water in between the weather this week. My wife, Eva, accompanied me on Saturday for some great fishing action on the Indian River. Fishing around bait rewarded us with catches of snook, trout, redfish,ladyfish, bluefish, jacks, snapper and grouper in our morning excursion. Eva finally got tired of reeling in fish, so we called it a day.



                              Topping of the day with snook.....

                              With all the bait available, there will be a nice assortment of fish to be sought in this time of plenty. Early morning will find snook, trout, ladyfish and jacks up on the flats seeking an easy breakfast. A good top water lure will give you plenty of action in the wee hours of morning. Switch to soft plastics or sinking lures once the sun rises and start moving to the deeper edges of the flats. Washed out sand holes on the flats are a favorite hiding spot for large trout during the morning also. Live shrimp is always a great way to catch dinner around the river. The entire river is alive right now!

                              Snook fishing has provided some nice slot size fish to the night anglers around the bridges and inlet area. Live shrimp is usually the bait of choice, but finger mullet is another good bait for snook fishing. Docks around the river have held snook, redfish and snapper. We fished several this week with good success. Live shrimp or soft baits will let you know if something is lurking under a dock.

                              Redfish are still hanging on the flats. I was slammed by a couple nice reds while fishing the bait schools. Soft baits have always worked great for me and I use them on the flats most of the time. All the rain has raised the water level in the river for a few days and allows you to fish areas normally pretty shallow.

                              Tip of the Week:

                              Take the time to watch the bait. Nervous bait means fish, lazy bait might be a sign to move on. Birds are cruising the skies looking for bait being chased. Learning to read the water can give you a good insight on where to fish or when to move to another spot. Take a little time and watch what is going on around you. The river is an exciting place to fish. Letting the fish, bait and birds tell you what is happening can help make your trips more successful!

                              As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                              Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                              Captain Charlie Conner
                              www.fishtalescharter.com

                              email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                              772-284-3852

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                SW FL-Bonita Beach: snapper smorgasbord, hogfish, cuda

                                This week was a good one for snapper of all varieties. Terry Mooney, Mike Franklin, Bob Myers and Jim Schultz fished with me Monday in 45 feet straight out of New Pass. We did well with snapper. We caught two 14 inch yellowtails and twenty mangrove snapper to 15 inches. We also caught triggerfish and porkfish and released three short hogfish and gag grouper shorts. As we were reeling in one of the mangrove snapper, with a light spinning rod and no steel leader, a 4 foot barracuda bit the snapper and ended up hooking himself in the lip. We managed to get the cuda to the boat without breaking the line, photographed and released it.

                                Mike and Sandy Chandler fished with me Tuesday morning when seas were predicted to be two foot. In actuality, we had 3-4 foot seas and sloppy conditions in 45 feet out of New Pass, with a steady fifteen knot wind. But, the fishing was good, which compensated us for the rough seas. We caught a dozen nice mangrove snapper to 16 inches, a keeper mutton snapper at 17 inches (see photo), a 13 inch hogfish and some whitebone porgies. We released smaller yellowtail and muttons, triggerfish, and a 15 pound goliath grouper. All were caught on shrimp, except for the goliath who ate a grunt as we were reeling it in.

                                The tropical weather system off our coast kicked up seas to 4-6 feet by Thursday, and I had to cancel my final trip for this week.
                                Captain Dave Hanson
                                Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                Bonita Beach, FL
                                239 947-1688
                                fishbuster@comcast.net
                                http://www.fishbustercharters.com

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  South Indian River Fishing Report

                                  September 28, 2007

                                  Inshore:

                                  Rainy days and rainy nights took over the weather forecast this week on the Treasure Coast. Fishing has been good if you braved the conditions to get out. We were stopped short for the Teen Anglers on Sunday due to thunder and lightning around the area. I managed a few hours later in the week before the storms moved in again. Looks like the pattern will continue next week as well. Break out the ol' rain gear if you try to get out. The water levels are high in the river and the quality has diminished and made it pretty cloudy for now. Lots and lots of bait out there and the fish continue to feed on it. The full moon slowed down the day fishing somewhat later in the week.

                                  Look for bait being chased to find the fish this week. Snook, trout, ladyfish, jacks and bluefish have all been out there giving the bait fits. You might have to try several spots to find where the bait is being crashed. Fish around the bait for the action. Top water, suspending lures and soft baits will be good choices to fish with. Live shrimp or mullet will also be great baits. Trout has continued to be productive this week. Try a few docks with some live bait in the early morning hours. Snook will hang around those docks waiting for breakfast to swim by. Most of the docks, due to the higher water conditions, will be a good option to try this weekend.




                                  Lots of action awaits anglers this month on the Indian River....

                                  Bear Point has been holding a lot of bait and we have been successful with trout there. Harbor Branch is another good area that continually produces fish for us. The bridges and channel edges have been yielding snapper and black drum with a few sand perch mixed in. I had one report of a large trout and 30" redfish caught up north of Fort Pierce. I had a few reports of flounder this week also. The night snook anglers that I spoke to reported mostly short snook being taken this week. A few slots and larger for the more successful ones. Live bait has been the best choice. Tarpon are feeding along the beach and inlets. Ladyfish and jacks are everywhere. Large ladyfish have invaded the flats and jumping on anything that moves. Great action for the young ones!

                                  So much for a soggy fishing report this week!

                                  Tip of the Week:

                                  It's that time of year to get out the cast net and use some live finger mullet for bait. It's all over the river and the food of choice for the predators cruising the waters. If it has been a while since you used your cast net. Get out in the back yard and practice some before heading off on the water. There are several good sites on the net that gives instructions on using a cast net if you are new to the art. It isn't hard to do, just learn a technique that works for you and practice it. Enjoy the fishing this time of year!

                                  http://www.calusa.com/howtothrow.cfm

                                  As always, remember, fishing is not just another hobby....it's an ADVENTURE!!

                                  Good Fishing and Be Safe,
                                  Captain Charlie Conner
                                  www.fishtalescharter.com

                                  email: captaincharlie@fishtalescharter.com

                                  772-284-3852

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast

                                    Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, October 2007

                                    Complements of Mosquito Creek Outdoors, Apopka Florida

                                    As the fall bait run continues, hordes of black and silver mullet, Atlantic menhaden (pogies), thread fin herring (greenies), and bay anchovies (glass minnows) flee for their live as they move south in search of a warmer climate. This migration signals the end of summer, and the beginning of some of the best fishing experienced on the Indian River Lagoon coast of Florida.

                                    Weather permitting, near-shore opportunities are the best you will see all year. Along the beaches, target areas of concentrated bait schools for a mixed bag of snook, tarpon, kingfish, cobia, jack crevalle, oversized redfish, and sharks. Additionally, snook fishing in the surf will continue to improve as the baitfish move south along the beach. Also look for schools of glass minnows to increase bringing larger Spanish mackerel, bluefish, and tarpon with them.

                                    In and around the inlets of Ponce, Port Canaveral, and Sebastian look for flounder, snook, jack crevalle, and oversized redfish feeding on migrating baitfish along the jetties and just outside the inlets. My preferred method of targeting the inlet redfish is to drift the inlet bouncing live mullet or pinfish on the bottom on a falling tide. Easterly swells, falling tides, and aggressive anglers can make conditions dangerous, so please pay attention, be patient, and catch-um-up.

                                    Inshore, look for slot redfish in close to the grassy edges along the shoreline shadowing pods of finger mullet, and for the larger redfish staged in deeper water ambush sites where migrating mullet are forced to venture out from the safety of the shallow flats. Also watch for snook to be tucked in close to the shoreline, ambushing pods of finger mullet as they pass by.

                                    In deeper water areas, look for ladyfish, spotted sea trout, jacks, and tarpon feeding on schools of glass minnows. These schools of fish are easily located by watching for bird and fish activity. Once located, these schools will produce explosive action on small top water plugs, or popping bug flies. Also, if you locate a school of the larger black mullet, try fishing spoons or soft plastic baits deep under the school. Even though, mullet are vegetarians, redfish and sea trout will often mingle in feeding on shrimp and crabs kicked up from the bottom by larger mullet.

                                    Seminars and Events

                                    October 13th, Braided Line Applications, Andy Thornal Company Fly Fishing Expo located under the Water Tower in Winter Haven, Florida. Call 863-299-9999 for more details.

                                    October 23rd, Orlando Kayak Club meets at 7pm Gander Mountain in Lake Mary, and Captain Rodney Smith is the guest speaker.

                                    November 16th, 17th, and 18th, Coastal Angler Magazines Boating and Fishing Expo at the Volusia County Fairgrounds with a full program of speakers and seminars.

                                    As always, if you have any questions or need more information, please contact me.

                                    Good luck and good fishing,

                                    Captain Tom Van Horn
                                    Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters
                                    www.irl-fishing.com
                                    407-366-8085 landline
                                    407-416-1187 on the water
                                    866-790-8081 toll free


                                    Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins!

                                    If you would like to be added to this Internet fishing report mailing list, just reply to this message or contact me at captain@irl-fishing.com.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island Fishing Report

                                      Road Trip II

                                      This is the second report on a recent road trip to Homosassa for the Florida Outdoor Writers Annual Convention. It was a great chance to get away from home and experience some great fishing in another part of the state. Homosassa provides the perfect spot to fish, sightsee, and just relax. The meeting was based out of the Riverside Resort which sets right on the Homosassa River. The resort offers great rooms, some with a river view and a great restaurant and bar area.



                                      One morning of the conference is always devoted to a “just for fun” fishing tournament. This year the Homosassa Guides Association put together about 20 boats for the 40 anglers that would participate in the tournament. Everyone was assigned a fishing partner the night before and told to meet at the boat ramp at 6:30 am. The rules were simple; the winner would be determined by the total length of all fish, measured in inches, rounded off to the nearest half inch. Score cards were provided and it was the duty of the captain to measure and record the catches.

                                      There were a few other rules to be observed. Rule number 5 stated, Kindly refrain from loudly exclaiming, “Purty Fish” or “It don’t get any better than this.” At the end of the days fishing everyone would meet at Tarpon Key Lodge by 11:15 am for a shore lunch provided by CCA Florida and awarding of the prizes. At the awards presentation all participants agreed to shout in unison to the winner, “You are the greatest angler of all time.”

                                      So, with the rules in place let the competition begin. My guide for the day was Captain Dan Clymer (Racin’ Mullet Charters -353-418-2160). Recognizing that the tides were not in our favor for redfish around the mangrove islands he chose to head on out into the Gulf of Mexico to target trout and grouper. It turned out to be a great decision as both trout and grouper were plentiful. It was really great being on the other end of the stick, so to speak. I let Captain Dan take care of everything and he was great at doing it all. I highly recommend him if you want to fish the Homosassa area.

                                      It was about six or seven miles out where we stopped in 6 foot water over grassy flats with numerous rock piles to attract the fish. A gentle wind provided the propulsion to quietly drift over the flats and work plastic baits over the bottom. It was one of those days when the fish hit a variety of baits. I was fishing Rip Tide Flats Chub jerk baits, 3 inch mullet, 3 inch shrimp and 4” mud minnows.

                                      All these baits were rigged and fished the same way. Power Pro mainline, 20 pound Triple Fish Fluorocarbon leader, and a 1/4 ounce Rip Tide Pro Jig head. All the various plastic baits were pinned to the jig head and fished slowly along and just above the bottom. Making long casts and slow retrieves produced spotted sea trout, grouper, sea bass, snapper, and ladyfish. The key to the bite seemed to be the slow retrieve. I would lift the rod tip and let the lure fall back to the bottom. The strike often occurred on the drop.

                                      The grouper seem to especially like the Rip Tide mud minnow and I use every one that I had brought along that day. The colors I always keep in my tackle box include the Rootbeer, Golden Glow and the Killifish. The sea trout were also hitting the mud minnow.

                                      I also used up all my Nite Glow 3 inch mullet while the Silver Mullet produced well too. After drifting the 6 foot water for awhile Capt. Dan decided to move to an area that was about 4 feet deep with beautiful sandy pot holes. The same tactics that worked in the 6 foot water worked here as well. We continued to catch numerous fish until it was time to make the run for the Tarpon Key Lodge and a shore lunch hosted by CCA Florida.

                                      As I sat under a shade tree at the lodge, accessible only by boat, I heard my name called as they began the awards ceremony. Captain Dan had dutifully measured and recorded the mornings catch and turned it in to the score table. I never even knew the total but after the tally it was the highest total inches and I had won the tournament. It turned out to be over 300 inches of fish. The largest fish in the total was probably no longer than 22 inches - there was just a lot of them. Of course the next question is what about the prize. If you know what a Heddon Tiny Torpedo looks like then you can blow it up to be three feet long and that was my trophy for the win. I plan on giving it to my 11 year old grandson – hopefully he will hang it from his ceiling and go to sleep each night thinking about fishing.



                                      As always, you can visit my website at www.inshorefishingadventures.com to view pictures of the fish we catch in the Cocoa Beach area. That's what it's all about. Good fishin'.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Inshore Fishing Report October 3, 2007 Jupiter / Palm B

                                        Inshore Fishing Report October 3, 2007 Jupiter / Palm Beach



                                        “The mullet run has begun”. Everywhere in my region the mullet are thick and the Snook are going ballistic, along with every other species that swims. The snook are on every seawall ambushing baits acting like missiles. The snook are going air born, snatching baits as they crash pods of mullet. Both tides are producing fish and it doesn’t matter if its high noon they keep on feeding. The Snook have been ranging from 20” to 43”. The docks and drop offs have also been producing nice snook. With all the bait around the key has been to make your bait look different from the others. Also with all the structure around and razor sharp barnacles Power pro is a must. I have been using 15 and 20 pound test Power Pro with 20 to 30” inches of 30 pound Ande fluorocarbon leader. The Tarpon have also been in the mix off all the madness. The Tarpon bite has been great on an incoming tide and outgoing tide early or late in the afternoon. The middle of the day the tarpon go deep do to the boat traffic. Both greenies and live mullet produce fish. For those who like to use artificials, jigs will also work. The tarpon have been ranging from 5 to 20 pounds with a few that are 30. The Jacks have been plentiful also, thrashing around near the sea walls as they devour the mullet pods that swim in their path.

                                        While fishing the sea walls and drop offs we have been catching some nice Jewfish and Gag Groupers. Live mullet has been the key. The bait must be on the bottom and be prepared for a tug a war, especially using the light tackle these fish put up a great battle.

                                        The night fishing has been an eventful show in the past few weeks. The dock lights have been thick with snook and tarpon. When first approaching the light it looks like bombs going off, do to the snook gulping down baits that swim into the shadow lines of the lights. The tarpon have been hanging on the outside off the light and docks, most off these fish cannot be seen. So pitching bait out into the darkness could produce a nice surprise.

                                        The freshwater fishing has been ok but do to the rain and all the run off the water has become murky. The Peacock bass bite has been slow, but they are around live bait has been the only tactic I have used. The largemouth bass can be found near any moving water and drop off as they ambush baits. Once the water clears up the bite will pick up.

                                        Well that is the fishing report for the Jupiter, Palm Beach area. If you would like to experience light tackle fishing at its best, for any of the species mentioned above give Capt. Craig Korczynski a call 561-644-4371 or visit www. PhlatsInshoreFishing.com. Email phlats1519@yahoo.com. I would like to thank Atonsolutions.com and PowerPro.com.
                                        Capt. Craig Korczynski
                                        Phlats Guide Services
                                        Light Tackle Inshore Fishing Jupiter/ Palm Beach
                                        www.PhlatsInshoreFishing.com
                                        561-644-4371

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          SW FL-Bonita Beach: bull shark, goliaths, hogfish, Span

                                          With peak slow-season upon us in southwest Florida, fishing trips have been scarcer this month. I was looking forward to two days of fishing this weekend, but with a last minute cancellation for one of them, I ended up offshore only on Saturday morning. I fished with Ron Lyrek, Pete Fredrickson, Will Williams, Bob Tofison, Craig Sneed and Tom Cartier. We headed out to about 38 feet west of New Pass in calm conditions, but with rough seas predicted to arrive later this afternoon and extend into at least the middle of next week, we already began to see rougher conditions on our way back in at mid-day. Using live shrimp, Craig caught a 14 inch hogfish, and the group caught seven keeper mangrove snapper that were all around 13 inches, keeper Spanish mackerel and whitebone porgies. We released triggerfish and short red grouper.

                                          I fished Friday morning, 10/5, with Herb & Renee Gueracio and their son James, friend Steven Macenas, and Steven’s mother, Peggy Macenas. We headed out to about 35 feet out of New Pass with live shrimp and caught a good variety of fish including a 22 inch Spanish mackerel, three keeper lane snapper, some keeper mangs and triggerfish. We released about 25 gag grouper shorts to 18 inches and a bunch of smaller snapper. We also released three goliath grouper that ranged 15-25 pounds, which we caught on blue runners, and a 4-foot bull shark.

                                          The photo shown is of angler Andy Alvarez with a 23 inch redfish caught on live shrimp on a recent inshore trip in Estero Bay.
                                          Captain Dave Hanson
                                          Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
                                          Bonita Beach, FL
                                          239 947-1688
                                          fishbuster@comcast.net
                                          http://www.fishbustercharters.com

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