Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hawaii

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hawaii

    Kona Hawaii fishing report – Feb. ’06 wrap-up…

    The winter season is nearing the end and it`s been a very mild winter so far. This is stormy season for Hawaiian waters but so far we`ve been blessed with flat waters almost all winter. The striped marlin never really came in this season. We had a few spurts of `em but nothing consistent. This make two years in a row of a slim stripie run and that followed three years of really good runs. We know very little about where the Hawaii striped marlin come from and go. Hawaii is such a small dot in the middle of a big ocean that I guess it can easily be passed by. Too bad the striped marlin aren`t more like the Humpback whales with a built in GPS.

    Mahi mahi has dominated the winter catch totals and that’s a little odd because when the water gets to be on the cold side (76) they usually aren`t around but we have had a lot of floating debris coming by the island. Nets, ropes, logs and with that stuff is usually mahi mahi no matter what the water temp. Spearfish is running a close 2nd to the mahi mahi catch and there has been blue marlin scattered (as usual) throughout the winter months.

    The bottom bite hasn`t been anything spectacular lately but I did catch the biggest amberjack of my career last month. Weighing in at 131 lbs., it`s the biggest amberjack caught since the new state record of 145 lbs. was caught in `02. The amount of sharks hanging around in the main bottom fishing area has lowered and the commercial snapper fishermen are liking that. Myself, I`d rater have some big sharks to fight. If you`re looking for a good battle, my personal experience is that between a marlin and a shark of the same weight, the shark usually fights longer and harder. While a marlin has the potential to be the tougher fight, they usually wear themselves out at the beginning of the battle and are pretty tired by the time you get them to the boat. With sharks, it`s near the boat when anglers need to be on their game and muster all the strength they can to get it to the boat and get the job done. While at leader next to the boat, sharks are usually more gentile and less dangerous than a P.O.`d marlin ……. As long as give up on thinking about getting your hook back.

    See ‘ya on the water,
    Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
    Kona Hawaii fishing

  • #2
    Kona Hawaii fishing report – M

    Kona Hawaii fishing report – March wrap-up .

    Big billfish top this months fishing report. Kona’s biggest blue, biggest striped marlin, biggest spearfish and biggest sailfish for the year were caught this March. There actually were several big blues caught this month and the biggest was Kona’s first “grander” of the year weighing in at 1,049 lbs. and boated on the Sea Genie II by angler Tommy Werner. Other marlin estimated as granders were also reported as fought and lost this month. While this typically isn’t the time of year known for big billfish, it’s proved many times through the years that a run of big ones can happen anytime. With that, just when we thought the striped marlin season was over, a run on those came in also. The biggest of the year was caught on the Hookele weighing in at 138 lbs. I got my fair share of stripe action too. Although very good eating, I released all of them this month, my biggest estimated at about 120 lbs. I still maintain the biggest stripe of the decade so far weighing in at 186 lbs. Each winter I stand a chance of loosing that claim but so far, so good. The biggest spearfish of the year came in early this month and weighted in at 63 lbs. Sailfish are rare in Hawaii and the boat that caught this years biggest one (so far) at 84 lbs. is even more rare. A 15’ Hobie Power Skiff with a 50 HP. outboard motor. The sailfish jumped into the boat during the fight and landed in the lap of one of the two occupants who was sitting on a bucket. No injury was reported. .

    Mahi mahi season has started and though Kona maintained a fair amount of mahi mahi throughout the winter, we should be seeing even more in the months to come. The ono seem to be biting lately also. Small bigeye and yellowfin tuna are still on the buoys and ledges and March even produced some blind strike big yellowfin weighing well over 100 lbs. .

    The bottom bite has been slow. The main reason I think is that the baitfish have been rather large this season and the bottom fish running rather small. Sharks and jacks usually run in the 40 to 100+ lb. range but there seems to be a bunch of small ones down there this year. Jigging has been the key to getting ‘em and I’m sure glad that Shimano started promoting the “Butterfly Jig System” in the US recently. I’ve been using the Japanese style jigs for almost 10 years now. The problem was that I could only get good jigs by bumming them from my Japanese jigging clients. In the US, you could get Diamond, Tady and Salas jigs and it was even harder to find them in the size and weight it takes to deep jig the Kona waters. The Shimano jigs work much better by design and are now available at two of our local tackle shops. The jigs are expensive as are the hooks and connecting rings but the price is well worth it. The reels that they promote for jigging are expensive too. Instead of Shimano reels, I’ve been using self-modified Penn 9500 spinning reels and 5’5” spinning rods for years. The trick on the Penn reel is to install a 2nd silent anti-reverse dog and Loc-tite all the screws and nuts. Jigging is really hard on a reel and if you just take a 9500 out of the box and go jigging, it may not even last a single day. I also attach a 2nd handle. By shimming the handles up so they face the same direction, it really balances out the reel and it’s much easier on the arms after a long day of jigging and a lot of fights. If anyone wants more information on my mods, shoot me an email. Jigging isn’t just tough on equipment, it’s also tough on the body. If you really get into this aggressive style of jigging, you’re in for a work-out. When just one arm starts looking like it belongs to Popeye, you may want to take my 2 handle advise. It’s IGFA legal!

    See ‘ya on the water,
    Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
    Kona Hawaii fishing

    Comment


    • #3
      Kona Hawaii fishing report – A

      Kona Hawaii fishing report – April wrap up –

      The blue marlin bite remained pretty decent in April. Not as many big ones as last month and the overall total seemed to be less but it’s not even the start of peak blue marlin season yet. If the pre-season numbers and sizes are any indicator of what’s to come this summer, Kona again will prove to be the Pacific Blue Marlin capital of the world. There were even some straggler striped marlins caught this month. The spearfish bite should be at its peak right now but there aren’t many around. They came in early this year so I’m sure we’ll be seeing that bite going hot and cold for the next couple of months for spearfish. .

      Mahi mahi tops this months report as the most common catch. We’re right in the middle of the peak spring run on those. Normally the fall season run produces the bigger mahi mahi and the spring season run is the smaller schoolie dolphin. The average size being caught this spring season is pretty big with most weighing over 15 lbs. and the average being close to 20. Ono season is starting off with a bang. We’re just at the beginning of the season for them now. Last year the ono bite started off real good at the beginning of the season but went to almost no ono being caught in the peak season. Because of what happened last year, you won’t be getting any predictions from me on how that bite is going to turn out this year. It’s just a “wait-n-see” on that one. .

      The bottom bite has picked up pretty good. Lot’s of big sharks in the area also. After catching and releasing a 120 lb. amberjack earlier this week, we hooked up another close to the same size right after and it was eaten in one quick gulp by one of those big eating machines. Just the day before in the same area, we caught a giant trevally and a tiger shark followed it right up to the boat. All I could say is that it was HUGE! If you’re looking to catch something that’s a lot bigger than you are, Sharks (also known as tax collectors around here) are the guaranteed catch right now. Last month I mentioned jigging and the modifications I’ve made to the Penn 9500. I did get some emails about it so I made a page up on my web site showing the mods and added a really good knot for joining braided line to mono. The URL is FISHinKONA.com/jigging.htm and there will be more info being added as time permits. Because of the sharks in the area, I’ve had to put jigging on hold. As I said last month, those Shimano jigs are expensive. The tax collectors (sharks) cost me way too much this month. Anyone else feel that way in April? .

      See ‘ya on the water,
      Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
      Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing

      Comment


      • #4
        Kona Hawaii fishing report – M

        Kona Hawaii fishing report – May wrap-up –

        The most common billfish being caught right now is spearfish. While good eating, they’re not what the common angler is trying to attain while fishing Kona waters. The coast is loaded with bait schools right now. Aku and shibi popping up out of nowhere and others being marked by bird piles from near shore to beyond the horizon. Now all we need is the blue marlin and ahi to find `em. There have been only a few marlin around and a few “blind strike” ahi catches. There has been a porpoise school outside the harbor and South that has produced some ahi also but with the abundance of bait in the water, when the summer yellowfin & blues do show up, there will be plenty of reason for them to stick around.

        Ono are beating out the mahi mahi right now as the most common catch but not by much. Both are in abundance so overall, adding in the spearfish bite, the bite is pretty good. A great opportunity for those looking to take home some fresh island fish or just to have some back at the condo. I cover how to get the fish home on the FAQ page on my web site.

        With the trolling bite being what it is, I haven’t been devoting much time to bottom fishing. On days that I have done it though, it’s been a quick and easy bite. The sharks are still abundant as are the amberjacks and almaco jacks. Jigging has been the quickest method for getting a bite but costly when the sharks rob you of not just the fish you’re fighting but your jig, hook and rings for a total about $30 and another trip to the tackle shop. I hear there are some cheaper jigs available in one of our local shops so I’ll be giving those a try when my expensive ones all get eaten. With tying my own trapper hooks now and jigs available for just over $10 (if they work), now I can loose twice as much tackle before I get pissed! Oh, did I say that out loud? My fingers were just typing away and it came out. Hope I’m not violating this forums vulgarity policy. If a moderator thinks it is, please insert “very very very very angry” where that other word is

        See ‘ya on the water,
        Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
        Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing

        Comment


        • #5
          Kona Hawaii fishing report – J

          Kona Hawaii fishing report – June wrap-up -

          The marlin have arrived. Blue marlin of all sizes – small to grander. Yes, there was a 1075 pounder caught and there have been reports of other 1000+ marlin fought/lost and one even caught, at the boat floating belly up dead but due to the incompetence of one of the crew, it slowly sank to the bottom with a bunch of shallow gaff holes and one gaff still in it. It was definitely a sad tale to hear and extremely frustrating for the angler and the one experienced crewman who, like many of us has yet to attain that coveted “grander” status. I congratulated the guys that did land that 1075 pounder this month and asked my long time friend Steve “How long did it take you to get it?” His answer “22 years Jeff.” A lot has to go right to subdue an animal that big. Most of the time it just can’t be done and the fish wins. Sometimes the boat wins and on rare occasion, they both loose. Personally, I’ve never even had a decent shot at getting one. I’ll continue to dream of that day though. The spearfish are here in full force and something very strange, the striped marlin came back. Normally a striped marlin caught in the summer is a rare thing here but several are being caught now. For those billfish huggers that are appalled about us killing a few (I almost always get comments from them), lighten up! We release many more than we kill (and eat). Unlike the longliners that kill thousands just to toss them back into the water dead. If you really want to make a difference, do something to shut those guys down instead of wagging your finger at us small time operators.

          Ahi season has arrived also. This is the time of year that we get the “blind strike” yellowfin tuna. One of the exciting things about this time of year is that when a reel starts screaming, it could be just about anything on the line. There are still some mahi mahi around and some ono being caught in the deep. Small yellowfin and bigeye tuna on the buoys and those “blind strike” tuna are usually yellowfin over 100 lbs.

          Sharks are dominating the depths right now. If you hook up anything other than a shark down there, you better be quick to get it up. Sharks can really move fast but as a general rule, they swim slowly acting like time is on their side. Almost every fish we hook that isn’t a shark will either get attacked right away or will have a shark following it right up to the boat. Slow down your (fast) retrieve rate just a little and your fish (and maybe your jig) is gone. Last month I talked about cheaper jigs. Yes, they work real good and yes, I’ve lost them all + some of the expensive ones to shark attacks. Back to the tackle shop today to get more of those cheap ones and some more hooks. I did some work on my jigging page (FISHinKONA.com/jigging.htm) and illustrate how to tie your own trapper hooks. The cheap jig (lost the last one yesterday to a shark) is in the bottom photo, the jig on the left.

          See ‘ya on the water or maybe the tackle shop,
          Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
          Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing

          Comment


          • #6
            Kona Hawaii fishing report – J

            Kona Hawaii fishing report – July wrap-up –

            As I said last month, the marlin are here. The full moon on the 10th and premium water conditions made for some really good fishing. The Hawaiian International Billfish Tournament, one of the most famous tournaments in the world was held this week. A five day tournament and it got off to a slow start. The week before the tournament started the current was switching and an influx of cold water hit the Kona coast. It shut the bite down to almost nothing. As the week progressed, the current became steadier, the water warmed up and the bite turned back on. Several billfish were tagged and released including many spearfish and striped marlin. There was another “grander” blue marlin (1027 lbs.) caught this week but not by a boat that was in the tournament. I’m not sure how many granders that makes for the year so far but I know of at least five. That’s a big improvement over the past few years.
            .
            The ono were biting pretty good until the current switched. They’ve scattered offshore so most that are being caught are being caught in the deep. Ahi and mahi mahi have also been a fairly common offshore catch for July. Trolling offshore for the day is almost a guarantee of getting hit. Getting them to stick on the hook has been a common complaint. Getting anglers to get one to the boat without loosing them has been a problem I’ve been having lately.
            .
            Jigging has been working better than bait for targeting the bottom. Not many sharks around anymore. Almaco jack and amberjack are the most common jig catch but you never know what else will hit a jig. Ono and snapper were a couple of recent jig catches but the one that really sticks in my head was just a light hit. After the hit, the jig felt heavy but not like there was a fish on it. When I got the jig up I found it snapped in two with the inner wire holding the halves together in the shape of an L. No marks on the jig whatsoever. Whatever hit the jig had a lot of speed and power but it must have missed with it’s mouth. I figure any fish head butting a 12oz. jig at high speed would probably be knocked out cold. I’ll never know what it was but I can imagine it would have been a pretty funny thing to see.
            .
            See ‘ya on the water,
            Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
            Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing

            Comment


            • #7
              Kona Hawaii fishing report – S

              Kona Hawaii fishing report – Sept. ’06 wrap-up.

              For those loyal readers of the Kona Hawaii fishing report, Sorry that there was no August ’06 wrap-up. I was on vacation for most of August. The beginning of the month wasn’t looking too good anyway and although I did keep in contact with a few of the captains during my vacation, it doesn’t appear that I missed much of a bite during August. Many people ask me “where do you go on vacation if you live in Hawaii”? To visit relatives that do not live in Hawaii of course. People also ask if I fish while on vacation. YEP! I fished almost every day this time. Also got in some white water kayaking, skydiving, flew around my brothers gyrocopter (a lot) and got to fly (with an instructor) a trike (powered hang glider) for the first time. Hey, if you’re not catching big fish in Hawaii, it’s real hard to find anything else that can come close to the thrill!
              .
              So, on to the September wrap-up. I think this is a crack up. I’m sitting here with writers block wondering what I can say about the month. I started wondering about last September so decided to look at last years report. What I found really made me laugh because it’s the same as this year. Here’s a quote from the ’05 report: “Fishing in September is really a gamble in Kona. I was just looking at my September fishing report from last year along with my own catch records from September ’04. What I saw prompted me to go ahead and look at my ’03 and ’02 reports also. I did find somewhat of a pattern. September is a good month for marlin overall but the bite seems to turn on and off throughout the month. Not just a slow down or pick-up. I’m talking` a definite ON / OFF. It also seems to be one of the best months for big marlin. Several 500+ marlin are caught in September and this year proved it again with quite a few big marlin both brought in and many released.”
              And so the “pattern” continues. I had a shot at one of the big blues just a few days ago but it came off after straightening out the Mustad 12/0 stainless hook.

              The 100+ yellowfin bite was pretty good all month long. The porpoise schools holding them have been near shore and easy to find. Usually it’s just the first boats in the school that get bit. The ahi get shy (or wise) after the first bite but there a few captains (not me) here that constantly catch them every time (almost). They pick one or some out of the school even though the rest of the fleet is having no luck. It takes a lot of dedication to keep up with the ahi. They’re fast, smart, have excellent eye site and are picky eaters. That’s where skill and luck separate.

              Mahi mahi are a fairly common catch right now followed by just a few ono and spearfish. The mahi mahi seem to be small this year. The bottom bite has been slow this September. As you may have noticed from recent reports, I’ve been doing a lot more jigging lately. Jigs of all size and shapes are now (as of this year) available at the local tackle shops in Kona. I’m also testing some new jigging equipment. I’ve had some good catches with the jigs including a couple of ono recently, the biggest kawakawa I’ve ever seen (made Kona’s “Big Fish List”) and even tried for some of those fast, smart, eagle eye, picky eaters but it seems that only the younger and smaller ones are stupid enough to fall for a jig. I guess the big ones don’t get big for nothin’.

              See `ya on the water,
              Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
              Kona Hawaii fishing

              Comment


              • #8
                Kona Hawaii fishing report – O

                Kona Hawaii fishing report – October ’06 wrap-up:

                October has always been one of my favorite months to fish because of the variety of fish to be had. Last year was the first October in memory that was bad. I’m glad to see that it’s back to normal this year. The blue marlin bite has been pretty good this month! Probably out doing the so-called “peak season” of the summer months. I use the word “probably” because there is a major factor to be considered. In the summer, there are simply more boats being chartered because summer is when most people take vacation. October is slower for business but those that are getting charters and going out are having good action. Other billfish that have been showing up are spearfish and striped marlin. It’s late in the season for spearfish and early for Striped marlin. That’s one of the things that makes October so interesting. Yesterday a boat caught a sailfish. That’s a rare catch in Hawaii and I’m sure glad he boated it. Luckily he’s a generous captain and I got a fillet. I ate it sashimi style (raw) and it sure was tasty stuff!

                The mahi mahi have arrived on time this year. The Fall season mahi are usually bigger in size than the Spring chickens but at the beginning of the month we were only seeing small ones come in. That has now switched and the big ones are here! Another decent bite has been with yellowfin tuna in the porpoise schools. Not too many schools around but the ones that do show up are holding fish.

                The bottom bite has been slow for October. It’s usually a lot better. I see lots of small fish marks on the fish finder screen but a severe lack of bigger marks. The commercial bottom fishermen are complaining that they’re not getting the numbers of fish (snapper and grouper) that they normally get this time of year. Hmmmmm, consider this. The best bottom fishing grounds in Kona were also the epicenter of the big earthquake that hit Hawaii on October 15th. Maybe, like many of us land based critters that live near the epicenter (like me), they’re still busy cleaning up and rebuilding. Habitat is essential for fish populations and almost nothing destroys fish habitats (or human ones) like natural disasters do. A reef that took hundreds of years to build can be gone in a moment of time. I’ll stop short of agreeing to give the fish disaster relief funds though.

                See `ya on the water,
                Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                Kona Hawaii fishing

                Comment


                • #9
                  Kona Hawaii fishing report – J

                  Kona Hawaii fishing report – Jan. ’07 wrap-up

                  The new year hasn`t shown us anything too impressive yet. This years biggest blue marlin stands at 611 lbs. the biggest striped marlin at 157 lbs. The marlin bite has been slow but we did have a nice run on spearfish at the beginning of the month and the biggest so far is 62 lbs. With the exception of the spearfish, the billfish bite just hasn`t been very good. As I said last month the striped marlin should be biting but it`s still early in the season for them and I have confidence that they`ll eventually show up.

                  Other fish that are still around although they really shouldn`t be here are the big yellowfin tuna and Otaru. These are summer fish and I mentioned in my December wrap-up that they were biting. They’re still here although the numbers are starting to decline. The mahi mahi are still around too.

                  The bottom bite has been the best bite going. The amberjack and almaco jack have made for some fast action. Live bait is the best to use but they’ve been in short supply. Dead bait just hasn`t been doing well for attracting the fish but the jigging has been HOT! Sharks moved in heavy in the middle of the month and made for some hard fights. They seem to be gone now. Another fish prized for it`s fighting ability is the Giant Trevally. Locally know as Ulua, these are one of the hardest fighting fish you can hook into. Early in the month we caught an 86.5 pounder on a jig. The fish swallowed the jig all the way down and the trapper hook (this is the only hook on the jig) barely stuck in just under it`s chin. That prevented the ulua from spitting out the jig. It’s one of those once in a life time lucky catches. It made the local paper as the biggest of the new year and didn`t even last `til the end of the month because another was caught just a week later weighing in at 90 lbs. Every year I take 1 to 3 positions on “The Big Fish List” of the 21 species listed. The list is filling fast and it looks like the competition this year is going to be tough. Lucky catches are a lot of fun and I`ve always said I`d rather be lucky than good any time but it takes more than luck to stay at the top. This year it looks like I’m going to need both.

                  See ‘ya on the water,
                  Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                  Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing
                  http://FISHinKONA.com/trapped.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Kona Hawaii fishing report – A

                    Kona Hawaii fishing report – April wrap-up.

                    April was a pretty weak trolling month overall with mahi mahi being the main catch but things are really looking up now. The ono run had started! I can’t say that it will stay in full swing through the summer but if the current run is any indicator of what’s to come, it’s going to be a good season. Another fish just coming into season is yellowfin tuna. There has been some caught almost daily in the porpoise schools but we’ll know the real run is happening when we start getting “blind strikes”. No indication that the yellowfin are even in the area and all the sudden one or more lines go off. Tuna surprise!

                    No matter how slow the trolling bite is in Kona you can always count on at least some marlin being caught here. That’s what makes Kona the Pacific blue marlin capitol of the world. A few big blues were landed in April although most were tagged and released. Striped marlin are scarce right now but still a couple a week coming in.

                    The bottom bite has been turning hot and cold. Normally the jacks are hanging on the edge of the ledges but bait schools running around is the flats, a very large area, have been scattering them and making them hard to find. A lot of big sharks have shown up too. Several 1000+ lb. tiger sharks have been spotted lately. One followed up an almaco jack that we brought in last Thursday but it was getting late in the day and not the type of people on board that could handle a big fight like that. I had several big shark fights in April and either pulled hook or broke terminal tackle on every one of them. I’ve been beefing up my rigs trying to prevent more failures but mostly it’s been a problem of me being too stingy with the drag at the end game. My anglers for the most part have been getting these huge sharks close to the boat but that’s when they go nuts, do a lot of thrashing and head shaking. It’s funny when anglers do that …… no no no, just kidding. Some of them have been less that happy that they didn’t get a chance to get a good shark photo though.

                    See ‘ya on the water,
                    Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                    Kona Hawaii Sportfishing

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kona Hawaii fishing report – M

                      Kona Hawaii fishing report – May wrap-up

                      May started off pretty slow but it ended with many nice catches. Several “Beast” blue marlin (over 500 lbs.) have been caught recently. Most are getting tagged and released. This is just one of the things that marks summer time in Kona. With the big females will also come many smaller male marlin to join in the fun. As I mentioned in last months report, the summer yellowfin tuna run is marked by “blind strikes” and that’s starting to happen now also. A few boats got a big surprise while trolling for ono this month when a school of big yellowfin tuna went cruising into the ono lane looking for breakfast. Everyone who was in the lane near the airport got multiple bites from 100+ lb. tuna. The lane is very close to shore and 40 to 60 fathoms deep. The big tuna usually don’t like coming in so close to shore but that particular area has a unique topography and as a result, often gets a mix of both near shore and off shore species. It was the hottest spot for ono around the middle of May and besides regular catches of tuna under 100 lbs., there were also some nice size mahi mahi caught in that same area.

                      In Kona, the speed and direction of the current is the most important factor when it comes to the bite being good or bad. Moon phase comes next followed by the tide height and times. The current was really weird in May and made the fishing very unpredictable. In many parts of the world, water temperature and tide changes are the most important factors. Here is Kona the tide is only about two feet and the water temperature remains about 80 degrees +/- four degrees between summer and winter. A temperature “break” is usually less than one degree and hardly a factor when fishing. The reason I’m mentioning this is that visiting fishermen will sometimes try to plan their particular day(s) of fishing around a moon phase or the solunar tables. I’ll admit that there is a slight factor there but in Kona, the current is the king and as far as I know, no one has figured out a way to predict what it will do. I suggest the high tech method of throwing a dart at the calendar.

                      The bottom bite has been pretty good for jacks and big sharks. These types of fish are a specialty of mine. In fact, I’m officially recognized as the discoverer of almaco jacks in Hawaiian waters (2002) and my oldest daughter caught a world and state record dusky shark that also was thought to be, but not proven to be in Hawaiian waters until her record catch in August 2000. While I do like trolling for billfish, tuna ono, mahi mahi and such, I’ve found with my years of experience that deep sea trolling is mostly just a game of luck. With bottom fishing, you can go where the fish live and get into some (almost) guaranteed fishing action. Doing both styles during the day mixes up the action and provides a bigger opportunity for a successful trip. Either way, luck or skill, come visit the flat blue waters of Kona and let’s catch some big ones.

                      See ‘ya on the water,
                      Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                      Kona Hawaii Sport Fishing

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kona Hawaii fishing report - May wrap-up

                        Kona Hawaii fishing report – May wrap-up .

                        Marlin were in short supply for most of May but the number of marlin catches has increased over the past week. Spearfish are the most common billfish being caught right now but with the summer season just starting up, we should see the numbers of blue marlin increasing and the number of spearfish decreasing. May is listed as the peak season for black marlin in Hawaii but what most people don’t realize is that black marlin are a rare catch in Hawaii. The spot on Kona’s “Big Fish List” for the biggest black marlin of the year remains vacant. With most marlin being caught and then released by the majority of captains now, it’s possible that one or more blacks have been caught this year and released without it ever being known that it was a black. It takes a keen eye to spot the subtle differences between the three types of marlins we catch here. The best way to tell a black marlin from its cousins is that the pectoral fins stick straight out and are fixed. Striped and blue marlin pectoral fins can fold back and lay tight against the body. If you’re going to release a marlin, it’s not likely that you’re going to take the time to try to move its fins. There is another way to tell a black from the others but that’s reserved for people who can spot those subtle differences I mentioned. A black marlin has a larger, fatter bill in comparison to its body. In fact, all three types of marlins caught in Hawaii have differences in the bill-to-body size proportions but it takes years of seeing these marlins next to the boat to readily spot those differences. .

                        Other billfish that are rare in Hawaii are sailfish and broadbill swordfish. The first broadbill of the year was brought in this month. Broadbill are caught at night and are usually a bycatch of the night time tuna fishery. There are only few broadbill and about a dozen sailfish caught in Kona in a typical year.

                        The blind strike ahi (yellowfin tuna) bite started right on time this year. From May until the end of summer, when a lure is taken on the troll, it just might be a 100+ lb. ahi.

                        The ono run started early this year. Last year they didn’t even show up. We had a little spurt at the beginning of the summer last year and then nothing for the rest of the summer. This year it looks like things might be back to normal.

                        Mahi mahi are still being caught on a regular basis but their close cousin, the pompano dolphin are being caught here also. I think there are only a handful of us here that even know the difference between a pompano dolphin and a mahi mahi. Most of the pompano are being mistaken as baby mahi mahi. It’s another one of those “subtle difference” things. I tried doing some research as far as how big they get. My IGFA world record book is from 2001 and the pompano dolphin isn’t even listed in there. I caught one yesterday that was about 14 lbs. and I found out today that the Hawaii state record for these is only 7 lbs. Most of them I’ve been catching are under 5 lbs. but the next big one I get (if I get another big one) will definitely get submitted for the state record.

                        The bottom bite was pretty good this month. The sharks have been thick so getting fish to the boat has been tough but the sharks in turn are a fairly easy hook-up and they make great sport. With the marlin in short supply right now, sharks are the biggest animal that you have a good shot at catching. On stand up tackle, they can be more of a fight than most anglers are up for. The “subtle differences” on shark identifications are even more complicated than with most fish. For instance, the difference between a bronze whaler and a dusky shark is the shape of the bottom teeth. I have to admit, most of the time I’m just guessing as to what kind I’m catching. I’m leaning. But just like playing with marlin fins, It’s too dangerous to give a P.O.`d shark a close dental check-up.

                        See ‘ya on the water ,
                        Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                        FISHinKONA.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Kona Hawaii fishing report - August wrap-up

                          Kona Hawaii fishing report – August wrap-up

                          Kona’s hot marlin bite continued to be good through the first couple of weeks in August but then slowed a bit. Part of the reason is simply less people fishing. The tournaments are over and August has typically been slower than June and July for tourism anyway. Couple that with the news media promoting a recession, presidential and other elections just around the corner not knowing if your taxes are going to go through the roof or not, The rising interest rates to even have a roof, electric bills, food, gas prices …… The price we pay to play has tightened up. Bigger ticket tourist activities like helicopter tours and fishing excursions are being replaced by cheaper things like more time on the beach, snorkeling and kayak rentals. September is typically the slowest of all the months here for tourism so it looks like I’ll have some time to go to the beach myself, do some surfing, ride my ATV, cruse my street bike, hang out at my new house and enjoy the awesome ocean view (while putting off all those unpacked boxes in the garage). Some of you may wonder if I like to go fishing on my days off. The fact is, I can’t afford to. I have to pay for the use of the boat and the fuel too. I’ll just wait for a paying charter to go have some fishing fun.

                          The yellowfin tuna bite has slowed down a whole bunch. Even the night time commercial guys have stopped trying. There has been smaller yellowfin tuna on the FAD’s in the 8 to 15 lb. range so for the people looking for some meat to cook up, it’s a good time right now. The ono bite hasn’t been very good but there are still some coming in. We’re seeing some mahi mahi around, an occasional spearfish coming in and the otaru are starting to show up so for those looking for some food fish, There shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

                          The bottom bite is really off right now. Bait fish are in abundance along the ledges but the bigger predators like sharks, amberjack, trevally and such that are normally around when the bait fish are, have traveled elsewhere. I’ve been chasing tiger sharks after hearing reports of them being sighted in certain areas but have yet to see one myself. As long as I run into one while fishing on my boat and not while surfing, I’ll be happy.

                          See ‘ya on the water,
                          Capt. Jeff Rogers
                          FISHinHAWAII.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Kona Hawaii fishing report - Sept. wrap-up

                            Kona Hawaii fishing report – Sept. wrap-up

                            It’s really difficult to determine if the fish are biting or not when the fishing effort is at it’s lowest in many years. As I mentioned last month, tourism is down and big ticket activities (like charter fishing) are at an even lower low. I have been luckier than most and I’m getting out one or two times a week so I’m still able to see a little of what’s going on out there but us fishermen rely on reports from other boats to determine where (or even if) there is a bite going on. It’s a big ocean out there and a single boat can only cover so much of it in a day. The marlin bite definitely slowed recently as a result of less fishing effort and the current switching from the typical North direction to a South direction had it’s effect too but trying to look at the big picture I would have to say that the marlin bite is down a little but not bad.

                            The yellowfin tuna bite from the porpoise schools has been hot! That’s a big change from what we were seeing near the end of August. Unfortunately for the charter boats out of Kona, the porpoise school has been far to the South so you have to be willing to burn a bunch of fuel and get there quick or else you’ll only have a short amount of time to work the school before it’s time to head back to port. I’m still waiting for the mahi mahi bite to kick in. I’ve been seeing a few mahi mahi flags flying but I didn’t even get a single bite from one in September. I tried some near shore ono fishing also in September also with no luck.

                            Back to the fishing effort issue. I’ve been spending a lot of my fishing effort sending bait and jigs to the bottom and have been rewarded with good action and some pretty spectacular fights. Most of the fights have been with sharks and some mixed giant trevally and amberjack action too. I had a few sharks hooked up this month that just outclassed my tackle so broken line and even a snapped rod a couple of days ago ended those fights. Tigers? Probably were. I got one tiger to the boat for a photo this month. At about 400 lbs., it was just a baby. A good fighter and one of the smallest tigers I’ve ever seen. Early in September, several beaches in Kohala (North of Kona) were close for more than a week because of tiger shark sightings. Against a swimmer or a surfer, even a 400 lb. baby has the home turf advantage and could easily make baby food out of a person.

                            See ‘ya on the water,
                            Capt. Jeff Rogers
                            FISHinKONA.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Kona Hawaii fishing report - Oct. wrap-up

                              Kona Hawaii fishing report – October wrap-up

                              While tourism is still down for the state of Hawaii, the amount of blue marlin in Kona was on the upswing in October. Marlin are odd critters in that they tend to run in packs of about the same size when a run starts and also about the same aggressiveness. We get runs of “light biters” that have a tendency to come in and check out the lures and nose around a little but not really come after them. On other runs that happen they may be collectively very aggressive and that makes for many great catches. Unlike Cabo where marlin hunting involves searching for fins on the surface, here in Hawaii seeing free-swimming marlin is rare. In the last couple of weeks I’ve seen more free-swimming marlin than I usually see in a whole year. The problem is, they don’t seem interested and there are no signs of aggressiveness at all when I drive past them with my lures. The color brightness of a marlin usually gives you a hint as to its attitude. All lit up brightly shows aggression. That’s the kind of fish that’s going to come in and smack your lures. The marlin I’ve been seeing the last couple of weeks are dark, swimming slow and for the most part, disinterested in those bright splashing and popping objects trailing behind my boat. I’ve heard the same description form a couple of other captains but at the same time, there are fair numbers of marlin being hooked up by the few boats going out. I really don’t want to kill any but I think my chances with a harpoon might be better than lures at this point.

                              The Fall mahi mahi run has started and, as is typical for the Fall run, they’re BIG! Thirty to fifty pounders are a common size this time of year. A great fight and great eating. The ahi bite slowed for October but as is typical for the winter months, the small yellowfin and bigeye tuna (shibi) will be here and some have already started to show up on the buoys and ledges. The ono bite was real slow this month but it’s not a good time of year for them anyway.

                              Some great news on the bottom fishing front. The biggest amberjack of the year was caught last Monday on the Monkey Business and weighed in at 137 lbs. That’s a big one! Bottom fishing for sharks, jacks and trevally was pretty good in October. As we come into winter, it will only get better. I had what you could call a spectacular catch myself this month. I started tagging amberjack, almaco jack and trevally in 1998 and I was a part of getting the statewide jack tagging program started. We caught an amberjack this month that had previously been tagged and was #225 of the number series that is now in the 10,000’s. I knew right away that this fish had not been tagged on the Big Island. Records show that this fish had been tagged at Maro Reef more than 1000 miles to the North of Kona in Sept. 2000. At a recorded length of 21” that put this fish at less than 10 lbs. when it was tagged. When we caught it (and released it again) it was 51” and weighed about 75 lbs. When the tagging program was started, the “known science” was that jacks live their whole life on one section of reef. The tagging program soon proved that to be false. In fact, it became apparent that the jacks around the island of Hawaii trend to circle the island in a counter-clockwise direction while on Maui, they circle in a clockwise direction. On Oahu, they do six months clockwise and six months counter-clockwise. Cool data! Also, this isn’t the first time a tagged fish has gone between islands but this is the longest distance traveled and may be the longest time span (more than 8 years) from tagging to recovery. I’m proud and privileged to be a part of one of the best fisheries in the world, Kona, Hawaii and also to be involved in the study of our ocean resources (I’m also on the billfish advisory committee for DAR) so my children’s children can have as much fun as I do rippin’ fish lips.

                              See ‘ya on the water,
                              Capt. Jeff Rogers
                              FISHinKONA.com

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Kona Hawaii fishing report - Nov. wrap-up

                                Kona Hawaii fishing report – November wrap-up ,

                                Not what you would expect for the winter season in Kona but the striped marlin haven’t shown up yet but some BIG blue marlin have. Like I said in last months report, they tend to run in packs of about the same size. The BIG ones are usually expected in the summer time but the fact is, They`re swimming around somewhere so why not cruise by that big pimple in the middle of the Pacific Ocean? I remember around Christmas time some years back that the same thing happened and any marlin caught under 300 lbs. was considered a baby. The biggest marlin of the month (a few more days to go so it’s not over yet) weighed in at 975 lbs. My buddy Chuck, Captain of the boat that caught it was a little disappointed in being just 25 lbs. shy of making “Grander” status but a fish that big is really nothing to be disappointed about. The very next day he had another BIG one on and broke line on it. Tourism is still way down but it appears to be getting better for the holiday season. Not many boats are going out right now so it’s hard to put a finger on how good the marlin bite is, only the size of the fish.

                                The mahi mahi bite continues to be good. The big ones (30 to 50) are still here. Most are being caught “in the blind” but the FAD`s are a good place to look also. I found a huge “floater” this week. A huge wad of netting and when I found it, I figured there would be mahi mahi all around it. All I found was small yellowfin, bigeye (shibi) and skipjack tunas. Very disappointing. I guess someone else beat me to it and cleaned it out. The South porpoise school is still producing some nice size ahi and the ledges are also holding shibi. Some ono were caught way down South but up by Kona, not good.

                                Bottom fishing season opened for the “forbidden seven” this month. These seven fish are six types of snapper and one type of grouper. The closed season was extended by another 46 days because the DAR (Dept. of Aquatic Resources) said they needed more time to “access the fishery” as if more than five closed months wasn`t enough time. What a bunch of B.S! They also implemented the first ever recreational fishing license in Hawaii that is required if you intend to deep drop for “the seven”. It’s nothing more than a foot-in-the-door technique to eventually require recreational fishing licenses for all fisheries in Hawaii. Recreational fishermen rarely do the deep bottom drops (I’m out there, I see what`s going on) but DAR states that the recreational catch of these “seven”, according to their statistics, stand at a rate of 3 to 4 times that of the commercial catch over the past several years. I’m still trying to figure out how they came up with that number seeing as how recreational fishermen (up `til now) didn`t report their catch? It`s a fictitious number that they made up. It just shows us how ignorant these desk jockeys really are about what goes on out on the water. If they dropped the amount of recreational catches down to a believable value, they would have the Federal catch reduction they are looking for. Maybe with the new license requirement (though not necessary) they`ll figure that out or, maybe they skewed the statistics on purpose in order to implement that recreational license? Hard to say. Another value they ignore is that people mainly fish the bottom fishing grounds that are near ports and boat ramps. That leaves most Hawaii bottom fish habitats unfished. Hmmmm. Last year they closed the bottom fishery earlier than required because they said the “total allowable catch” had been reached. They came up with this figure even though 85% of the commercial bottom fishermen had yet to turn in their reports. It must be those recreational guys catching all the fish huh? It’s just plain stupid to think that a degree and a desk makes you more knowledgeable about a fishery than people working behind the wheel on the water but the power of a DAR pen has time and time again proven mightier than any number of fishermen speaking out.

                                See ‘ya on the water,
                                Capt. Jeff Rogers
                                FISHinKONA.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Kona Hawaii fishing report - Dec. wrap-up

                                  Kona Hawaii fishing report – Dec. wrap-up .

                                  Tourism definitely picked up for the holidays. With all the snow, ice and freezing temps happening in the continental US, Hawaii was a good holiday destination choice for many. The tourists aren’t afraid to spend their money either. It’s the most boats I’ve seen going out since September. The trolling bite has been fair but not great. Good size blue marlin continue to be caught by the fleet on a daily basis and finally, the striped marlin have shown up. There were two of them caught on the 22nd and more followed after that. I’m really looking forward to catching my first small one of the season because it’s my 2nd most favorite fish (after the Hawaiian grouper) to eat. Like most billfish, the small ones are tender but as they get bigger, the meat gets tougher. The flavor of a striped marlin really depends on what they have been feeding on. Killing a striped marlin only to find that the meat is white is somewhat disappointing. It doesn’t taste much different than a blue marlin so it’s just not very tasty (not bad though) but usually the striped marlin meat is some shade of pink. It makes great sashimi and I personally think it tastes better than sashimi cut from yellowfin or bigeye tuna. Once in a while you get the real big treat and find pumpkin orange colored meat. It is indeed the most awesome of all the billfish meats even beating out broadbill swordfish and spearfish. The spearfish are running now also so I wouldn’t pass up a fresh spearfish meal either. We really do get spoiled here in Hawaii with all the varieties of tasty fish we catch here. More on that later.

                                  The big mahi mahi are still here even though it’s late in the season for them. We had a nice yellowfin tuna run this month. Not the little guys that are typical for this time of year around the ledges and buoys but the 100+ ones. They were hanging out with the porpoise school as they usually do but in the winter months we usually don’t see this many around. Yellowfin tuna sashimi is a big favorite here in the islands for Christmas and new years parties.

                                  The bottom bite for sportfish like sharks and jacks should be good right now but it’s a bit slow. The bite should be picking up soon on those. In last months wrap-up I talked about the “forbidden seven” and the regulations that have come down from the DAR. It seems to me that they have created even more of a problem with their regulations this year than in years past. By extending the closed season by a month and a half, they brought the open season closer to the time of year when there is the highest demand for red and pink snapper. Just like yellowfin sashimi is a desired holiday favorite in Hawaii, so is steamed snapper. Because there was no snapper on the market for several months, the price for them was WAY up when the season started. The snapper bite started off slow in November but this month they were easier to catch and the commercial fishermen were filling cooler loads. More fishermen heard about the good bite and shifted their efforts toward catching snapper. Well, with the high number of snapper being caught, the price went down. Easy fix, just spend more time and effort catching more of them to make up the difference. In all my years fishing here I have never seen so many boats targeting the deep snapper. When the DAR first started their public forums about upcoming regulations, one of their concerns was that when the season opened, there would be so much fishing effort on them that it would negate the closure. In years past, that didn’t happen but it may be happening this time. I expect a panic reaction by the DAR with an immediate closure of the fishery within the first couple months of the year. Of course, if they just left it alone, it would settle out on it’s own but if they create another closure panic, the price will shoot back up and the fishing pressure will increase just prior to the closure. That’s my (professional) opinion, we’ll have to wait and see how it pans out. In the mean time, I have fresh snapper in the fridge to bring in the New Year and expect some fresh striped marlin sashimi is not far behind.

                                  See ‘ya on the water ,
                                  Capt. Jeff Rogers ,
                                  FISHinKONA.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Kona Hawaii fishing report - Jan. wrap-up

                                    Kona Hawaii fishing report – Jan. wrap-up .

                                    Tourism remains pretty good here with a fair number of boats going out daily. Not as many as in previous years but I think the cold mainland temperatures are keeping more people thinking about Hawaii sun and fun. The blue marlin are biting good right now. It’s striped marlin season and there are some of those being caught but the number of blue marlin around is exceptionally high for this time of year. The big ones are here too. So far the biggest blue weighed this year stands at 914 lbs. Spearfish are in abundance too and are great fun on light tackle. Last week I caught and released a blue marlin that weighed about 250 lbs. and when it came up jumping next to the boat, I saw that it had no bill sticking out. When I got the marlin right next to the boat. I saw that it did indeed have a bill but it was bent 180 degrees backwards and growing tight across the top of it’s head. On each side of the backwards bill were two smaller stunted bills sticking in the right direction (forward) that more resembled tusks. The story and picture hit the Kona paper with the title “World’s ugliest marlin caught” written by Jim Rizzuto. The black and white photo in the local newspaper doesn’t show near the detail of the full color photo. I know many of you want to get a look at this thing. There is a photo of it on my fish photos page but it doesn’t show the detail of the close up head shot I got. Sorry, but I’m reserving putting that out on the internet for a later time because a few fishing magazines have expressed interest in using it. Once it’s old news, I will definitely put a full color close up on my “Hall of Fame” page. Some people say that I should have killed the marlin and given it’s head to science. I think it will be even more interesting if it’s ever caught again and to see a photo of this 3-billed marlin when it grows to 500+ pounds.

                                    The mahi mahi are biting good also and are the most common fish being caught right now. There are some ono being caught even though it’s not season for them. Shibi (small yellowfin and bigeye tuna) are on the buoys and ledges but not in great numbers.

                                    Continuing the story of the “forbidden seven” fishery, the number of boats fishing for them has dwindled to just a few of the old regulars. This brings the fishery back to more “normal” catch levels. I don’t think that will keep the DAR from having a panic reaction when they compile the catch reports from December though. The bottom bite for bigger game has been frustrating. The fish are being shy. Hitting the baits but not wanting to commit to eating them. Some of the time it’s that the bait fish are just too big for the fish to swallow but in other cases, I’ve found the fish I’m catching are so full that they can hardly get in another bite. The bait fish are in abundance right now too but again, not biting well for the same reason. They’re already full.

                                    Overall, The Kona bite is good for a January. There are plenty of fish here. The fact that the ugliest blue marlin in the world even showed up to get in on the action proves it.


                                    See ‘ya on the water ,
                                    Capt. Jeff Rogers
                                    FISHinKona.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Kona Hawaii fishing report - Feb. wrap-up

                                      Kona Hawaii fishing report – February wrap-up .

                                      The bite has been soooo good for February that the term I first thought of to describe it is “off the hook”! That’s urban slang for awesome, incredible, wicked, unbelievable, gnarly and such but the term sounds almost derogatory when used to describe a really really good fish bite happening. On the hook? Yes, many of them. I suppose the fish themselves like the term “off the hook” but anglers only like it when a fish is released “off the hook” on purpose. The blue marlin bite has been as good as any summer month, the time when blue marlin fishing is generally at it’s best. I always tell my clients, fish don’t know what month it is and, it’s a huge ocean. The fish are going to be swimming around somewhere in it. Hawaii is just a little pimple in the big pond. The striped marlin and spearfish showed up also as is typical for this time of year but for the last few years, the numbers haven’t been too impressive. It’s good to have them back around in decent numbers. On a recent trip we hooked two striped marlin at the same time within the first hour of the trip but they both came “off the hook” in the bad way. Later we had two spearfish on at the same time. One came “off the hook” but we boated the other one. Later in the day we hooked a nice size blue marlin but it also came “off the hook” in the bad way. Just realizing that in today’s urban slang, bad sometimes means good but obviously that’s not what I talking about. I really would have liked to catch and release that blue. The rest of the day resulted in two more billfish bites. One of them happened so fast that we didn’t see what kind it was. The last bite of the day resulted in boating another spearfish. We intended in releasing the second one but the hook mortally wounded it so we took it. The option of taking or releasing the fish varies from boat to boat. Some boats are “kill all” boats and some are “release all” (except food fish and dead billfish) boats. If you plan on fishing Kona and have a problem either way, keeping or releasing, make sure you find out your captains policy first. I’m right up front with my policy on my web site’s Frequently Asked Questions page.

                                      The mahi mahi are biting good right now but a little slower than last month. The small yellowfin tuna (5 to 30 lbs.) are on every single FAD (fish aggregation device) and along the ledges. Bait fish like small skipjack tuna and mackerel are here in abundance on the buoys and ledges also.

                                      With the trolling bite being so good I’ve been spending less time bottom fishing but even that bite has been so good that it’s been an easy way to break up the trolling day with some quick shark action. That’s what I’ve been catching most while dropping baits and only a few bites from GT, amberjack and almaco jack.

                                      I know this is a fishing report but one thing I almost never mention in my reports or even on my web site is the awesome whale and dolphin watching opportunities we get on almost every trip. I guess I’m just so use to seeing them all the time that I don’t give it much thought. It’s usually the guys that are interested in catching fish and the gals are just along for the ride. If your one of those guys having a hard time convincing your gal to let you go fishing, let them know about the whales and dolphins. Promise that you won’t try to hook one though. It does happen once in a while and that kind of action is REALLY “off the hook”.

                                      See ‘ya on the water ,
                                      Capt. Jeff Rogers
                                      FISHinKona.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Kona Hawaii fishing report - March wrap-up

                                        Kona Hawaii fishing report – March wrap-up ,

                                        What a difference between February and March. The trolling bite went from “soooo good” (last months report) to “not so good”. Typically March is better than February but as I’ve stated before, pelagic fish have no idea what month it is. There going to be swimming around somewhere in the ocean and the Kona coast is just a very small part of it. Very few striped marlin were caught this winter, the season when there are more caught. By this time I think it’s safe to say that for the 4th year in a row now, the showing of striped marlin in Kona was pitiful. It’s my hope that they were just swimming around elsewhere and hope that the schools have not been decimated by the many fish catching and processing factory ships that roam the seas. Our blue marlin bite can be hot or cold any time of the year and the blues don’t tend to congregate as tightly as striped marlin. With that in mind, blues would be less vulnerable to being caught and processed by factory ships. OK, so I’m (kind of) doing some finger pointing without any proof. I really don’t know how many metric tons of what kinds of fish they’re catching and processing, only that they do it. I know that yellowfin tuna is a big one on their target list of fish and with that said, I’m about to contradict the “they did it” theory. Usually the big (100+) yellowfin tuna start showing up in bigger numbers around May and the bite can be good through September. Some years the summer run is poor but for the last two years, the yellowfin tuna bite has been good. It’s really too early to tell but it looks like it’s going to be another good year. There are a handful of boats in Kona that specialize in yellowfin tuna year-round. These few boats go out and target the yellowfin on nearly all their charter trips and if they think they can catch enough yellows to sell and make it worth their while, they go out without a charter. These few boats have been doing quite well lately catching big yellows, some over 200 lbs., that are in the porpoise schools. When/if the summer yellow run really kicks in, we start getting “blind strikes” while trolling anywhere off the Kona coast. Kind of like, if there are enough nuts lying around, even a blind squirrel can find one.

                                        The trolling bite hasn’t been all bad. Also showing up bit early for their summer run has been some ono. They’re biting mostly on the South ledges and should be starting to show up near the harbor soon. Personally I like the North ono run and have been trying it a little but haven’t had any luck there. We have a good network of captains here so when they start showing up on the North run, I’ll know it. Mahi mahi are currently the most common fish being caught on the troll. Sizes are ranging from large to small and good eating no matter what the size.

                                        The bottom bite has been producing a good number of giant trevally. They are one of the most prized fighting fish in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Personally I love watching anglers match strength with these fish only to find the shocked look on their face when I bring the fish on board (for photo, tag and release) and they see that it’s only half the size they thought it would be. The shark bite has been pretty good too. Most of them have been sand bar sharks in the 40 to 80 lb. range and they put on a good fight too. I split up my charter days by doing both trolling and bottom fishing but it’s the bottom fishing that gives me the most anticipation of a bite. The key to the bottom fishery is using bait fish, live bait being best. If a blind squirrel were looking for a nut and that nut was shaking and smelling very nutty…… well, you get the picture.

                                        See ‘ya on the water ,
                                        Capt. Jeff Rogers
                                        FISHinKona.com

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X