Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Jersey

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Jersey

    New Jersey Activist Gets Jail Term for Harassing Hunters- (09/05)
    New Jersey

    Join our e-mail alert list


    A New Jersey woman and three other anti-hunting activists were sentenced on August 31 for obstructing two bear hunters during the 2005 New Jersey bear hunting season.



    Angie Metler of Vernon, New Jersey was sentenced to 40 days in jail and ordered to pay a $300 fine. Her accomplices, Albert Kazemian, Theresa Fritzges and Janet Piszar were also ordered to pay similar fines. Kazemian incurred additional fines for resisting arrest.



    Metler and the other activists were arrested after they repeatedly harassed two hunters, William Devine and Jon White. The hunters reported the harassment to Wawayanda State Park officer Walter Sanford, who accompanied the hunters into the woods on the day of the arrest.



    Recently, the activists dropped charges they had filed against Devine and White in order to gain favor with the prosecution. The activists claimed the hunters menaced them by pointing a gun at them during the confrontation.



    The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance provided legal advice and aid to Devine and White in defending themselves against the activists’ baseless claims.





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Information on this website can be reprinted with a citation to the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance and www.ussportsmen.org

  • #2
    [b]New Jersey Governor Will No

    New Jersey Governor Will Not Approve Bear Hunt- (10/27)
    New Jersey

    Join our e-mail alert list

    New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine plans to cancel the 2006 black bear hunt by refusing to sign the state’s hunting and fishing regulations.



    Gov. Corzine, who is a staunch opponent of the state’s bear season, refuses to approve a routine five-year renewal of state fish and wildlife regulations. The measure, which regulates hunting and fishing in New Jersey, calls for annual black bear hunts through 2009.



    “The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation is committed to ensuring the future of bear hunting in New Jersey,” said U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation (USSAF) Senior Vice President Rick Story. “Our legal team is evaluating the situation to determine our options in protecting the hunt.”



    The USSAF and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs sued the DEP and its Commissioner, Bradley Campbell, when the Commissioner cancelled the 2004 black bear hunt. The sportsmen’s groups argued that the council’s authority to set hunting seasons is not subject to a DEP veto. A lower court agreed, but the Supreme Court handed the authority to the Commissioner.



    In 2003, when the state initially approved its bear season, the USSAF battled antis’ legal challenges to stop the hunt. It has been in court each year since to protect the hunt.



    This year’s bear season is scheduled to begin Dec. 4.





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Information on this website can be reprinted with a citation to the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance and www.ussportsmen.org

    Comment


    • #3
      New Jersey Sportsmen Called to

      New Jersey Sportsmen Called to Action!- (11/03)
      New Jersey
      Join our e-mail alert list

      <font color="aa00aa"><font size="+2">America’s leading sportsmen’s rights organization is calling out the dogs on New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine.</font></font>



      At issue is the governor’s order to the Department of Environmental Protection &#40;DEP&#41; to scrap the scheduled 2006 black bear hunting season.



      The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance &#40;USSA&#41;, which has been fighting to protect the bear hunting season since 2003, is asking New Jersey sportsmen to voice their complaints to Gov. Corzine, DEP Commissioner Lisa Jackson, as well as local newspapers and talk radio.



      “The governor’s decision is an attack on hunters and a threat to public safety,” said Rob Sexton, USSA vice president for government affairs. “The top wildlife professionals in New Jersey designed a plan to control black bears, and hunting is a key ingredient. Hunters deserve the opportunity, and more important, the public needs a governor who puts the lives of people ahead of politics.”



      Corzine, who says the policy “does not reflect my views on the hunt,” has asked DEP Commissioner Jackson to spend tax dollars on alternatives to hunting before he will approve the hunt. In the meantime, black bear numbers continue to rise and research continues to show that bear birth control measures, which are favored by hunt opponents, are ineffective.



      The U.S. Sportsmen’s Legal Defense Fund &#40;U.S. SLDF&#41;, the USSA’s legal arm, along with Safari Club International and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs will be bringing suit against the state of New Jersey.



      New Jersey sportsmen must take action! Gov. Corzine is risking the safety of New Jersey citizens and is willing to waste taxpayer dollars to do it. Contact Gov. Corzine and DEP Commissioner Jackson and urge them to put people before politics. Tell them you want the bear hunt.



      Don’t stop there! The USSA is asking sportsmen to write letters to local newspapers, and to call local talk radio programs to spread the word about the governor’s decision to stop the bear hunt.



      Below is contact information for the Governor, the DEP Commissioner, local newspapers and radio stations.



      Gov. Jon Corzine

      State House

      PO Box 001

      Trenton, NJ 08625

      &#40;609&#41; 292-6000

      South Jersey Office &#40;856&#41; 614-3200

      North Jersey Office &#40;973&#41; 648-2640

      Fax: &#40;609&#41; 292-3454



      Lisa Jackson, Commissioner

      Department of Environmental Protection

      401 E. State St.

      7th Floor, East Wing

      PO Box 402

      Trenton, NJ 08625-0402

      Phone: &#40;609&#41; 292-2885

      Fax: &#40;609&#41; 292-7695



      For sample letters, visit the USSA’s Legislative Action Center.



      Write Letters to the Editor

      A letter to the editor can educate others about the importance of New Jersey’s bear hunt. It will also help drive home the message that sportsmen are behind the issue and will speak up to make sure their voices are heard.

      Remember these things when composing an effective letter:



      Know your newspaper or magazine’s policy on writing letters to the editor;
      Know length requirements and what information must be sent with the letter;
      Discuss recent information;
      Keep the letter short and simple. Focus on one issue in four paragraphs or less.
      Prove local relevance by using local statistics, personal stories and specific names;
      Follow-up by phone when you submit a letter.


      Add these to the list of newspapers you plan to contact:



      Newark Star-Ledger&#42;

      Editorial Department

      The Star-Ledger

      1 Star-Ledger Plaza

      Newark, NJ 07102-1200

      Editorial Page Editor: Fran Dauth

      E-mail: eletters@starledger.com

      Phone: &#40;973&#41; 392-1536

      &#42; Letters must not exceed 200 words.



      Daily Record

      Letters to the Editor

      Daily Record

      800 Jefferson Rd.

      Parsippany, NJ 07054

      Editorial Page Editor: Fred Snowflack

      Fax: &#40;973&#41; 428-6666

      E-mail: letters@dailyrecord.com

      Phone: &#40;973&#41; 428-6617



      Asbury Park Press

      Your Views

      Asbury Park Press

      3601 Highway 66, Box 1550

      Neptune, NJ 07754-1551

      Fax: &#40;732&#41; 643-4014

      E-mail: yourviews@app.com



      Press of Atlantic City&#42;&#42;

      The Press Editorial Page

      11 Devins Lane

      Pleasantville, NJ 08232

      E-mail: letters@pressofac.com

      Phone: &#40;609&#41; 272-7266 or 272-7267

      &#42;&#42; Does not accept letters without name, full address, daytime and evening phone numbers. Letters are subject to editing. The shorter the letter, the more likely it will be published. For full details of The Press letters policy, call &#40;609&#41; 272-7279.



      Bergen-Hackensack Record

      Letters to the Editor

      The Record

      150 River St.

      Hackensack, NJ 07601-7172

      Fax: &#40;201&#41; 646-4749

      E-mail: letterstotheeditor@northjersey.com

      Phone: &#40;201&#41; 678-3925 ext. 2



      Bridgewater Courier News

      1201 Route 22

      Bridgewater, NJ 08807

      Contact: Angela Haley

      E-mail: cnletter@c-n.com

      Phone: &#40;908&#41; 707-3138



      South Jersey Courier-Post

      Mark Correa, Editorial Page Editor

      South Jersey Courier-Post

      PO Box 5300

      Cherry Hill, NJ 08034

      E-mail: mcorrea@courierpostonline.com

      Phone: &#40;856&#41; 663-6000



      Home News Tribune

      Letters to the Editor

      Home News Tribune

      35 Kennedy Blvd.

      East Brunswick, NJ 08816

      E-mail: letters@thnt.com

      Fax: &#40;732&#41; 565-7208



      Easton Express-Times

      Jim Flagg, Editorial Page Editor

      Easton Express-Times

      30 N. 4th St., PO Box 391

      Easton, PA 18044-0391

      Send Letter to Editor online: http://www.pennlive.com/mailforms/expressletters/

      E-mail: letters@express-times.com

      Phone: 610-258-7171 ext. 3547



      Jersey City Journal

      Send Letter to the Editor online: http://www.nj.com/mailforms/journalletters/



      New Jersey Herald

      The New Jersey Herald
      2 Spring Street
      P.O. Box 10
      Newton, NJ 07860

      E-mail: letters@njherald.com



      Trenton Times

      Letters to the Editor

      The Times

      P.O. Box 847

      Trenton, NJ 08605

      Contact: Diana Groden

      E-mail: letters@njtimes.com

      Fax: &#40;609&#41; 394-2819



      Trentonian

      600 Perry St.

      Trenton, NJ 08618

      E-mail: editor@trentonian.com

      Fax: &#40;609&#41; 393-6072



      Contact Radio Stations

      For example, Jim Gearhart is a radio personality on New Jersey’s 101.5 FM who recently lambasted Gov. Corzine for his decision to stop the hunt. Contact Gearhart weekdays from 6:00 am – 10:00 am at &#40;800&#41; 283-1015. Speak up for sportsmen’s rights and speak up for the safety of New Jersey’s citizens.



      Reach Out

      Continue to reach out to fellow sportsmen, conservation club members, family and friends and urge them to support New Jersey’s black bear hunt. Print this page and let them know how they can help protect wildlife management in New Jersey and keep the state’s citizens safe.



      The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance protects the rights of hunters, anglers and trappers in the courts, legislatures, at the ballot, in Congress and through public education programs. For more information about the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and its work, call &#40;614&#41; 888-4868 or visit its website, www.ussportsmen.org.





      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Information on this website can be reprinted with a citation to the U.S. Sportsmen&#39;s Alliance and www.ussportsmen.org

      Comment


      • #4
        [b]<font color="0000ff"><font

        <font color="0000ff"><font size="+2">Scheduling of Bear Hunt Classes Does Not Guarantee NJ Hunt- &#40;11/10&#41;
        New Jersey </font></font>

        Join our e-mail alert list

        Gov. Jon Corzine’s cancellation of New Jersey’s 2006 bear hunt hasn’t deterred the state Department of Environmental Protection &#40;DEP&#41; from scheduling required classes for potential hunters. The whole issue hangs on the success of the lawsuit brought by the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation and other sportsmen’s groups seeking to overturn the governor’s action.



        The DEP has scheduled bear hunt training seminars to begin Nov. 13. The course is required for anyone who plans to hunt New Jersey black bears. Unfortunately, DEP Deputy Chief John Watson said the training courses do not guarantee a 2006 hunt, which is scheduled to begin Dec. 4.



        Despite increasing numbers of bear sightings and incidents, and the success of the state’s 2003 and 2005 bear seasons, Gov. Corzine has refused to distribute permit applications or issue bear permits. He has gone as far as to direct state officials to use only “non-lethal methods” to control the state’s bear population.



        Take Action! Click here for information about how you can contact Gov. Corzine and DEP Commissioner Lisa Jackson and support the bear hunt.



        The U.S. Sportsmen’s Legal Defense Fund &#40;U.S. SLDF&#41;, the litigation program of the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation &#40;USSAF&#41;, Safari Club International, and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs are suing the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Division of Fish and Wildlife to challenge the state’s inaction.



        State statutes and regulations require that a hunt take place. New Jersey’s black bear management strategy, ordered in 2005 by the New Jersey Supreme Court, calls for bear hunting as an integral management tool.



        The U.S. Sportsmen’s Legal Defense Fund is the nation’s only litigation force that exclusively represents sportsmen’s interests in the courts. It defends wildlife management and sportsmen’s rights in local, state and federal courts. The SLDF represents the interests of sportsmen and assists government lawyers who have little or no background in wildlife law.





        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Comment


        • #5
          Sportsmen Amend Lawsuit after

          Sportsmen Amend Lawsuit after DEP Commissioner Nixes Bear Hunt- &#40;11/17&#41;
          National
          Join our e-mail alert list

          <font color="119911"><font size="+2">New Jersey’s top environmental official has terminated the 2006 bear hunt.</font></font>



          In response, the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation, along with Safari Club International and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs, have amended their recently filed lawsuit against the state to challenge the cancellation and allow bear hunting permits to be issued.



          The three groups had filed suit earlier this month to force the state to issue bear hunting permits, as required by law.



          On Nov. 15, Department of Environmental Protection &#40;DEP&#41; Commissioner Lisa Jackson rejected the state’s black bear management policy, which called for the December hunt. In a letter to the New Jersey Fish and Game Council, Jackson said that non-lethal bear controls had not been given sufficient consideration.



          “Clearly, Commissioner Jackson does not have the authority to dismiss approved regulations on a whim,” said Rob Sexton, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation &#40;USSAF&#41; vice president for government affairs. “Her decision drags politics into wildlife management and disregards the sound science on which it should be based.”



          Despite increasing bear sightings and incidents, and successful hunts in 2003 and 2005, Jackson and Gov. Jon Corzine have put politics ahead of public safety. Gov. Corzine, who campaigned for office as a hunt opponent, directed the DEP Commissioner to analyze the policy permitting the hunt.



          New Jersey’s black bear hunt had been scheduled for Dec. 4-9.



          The U.S. Sportsmen’s Legal Defense Fund is the nation’s only litigation force that exclusively represents sportsmen’s interests in the courts. It defends wildlife management and sportsmen’s rights in local, state and federal courts. The SLDF represents the interests of sportsmen and assists government lawyers who have little or no background in wildlife law.

          Comment


          • #6
            [b]<font color="ff0000"><font

            <font color="ff0000"><font size="+2">New Jersey Bear Hunt Cancelled- &#40;11/29&#41;
            New Jersey </font></font>

            Join our e-mail alert list


            Through its inaction New Jersey’s highest court blocked the state’s 2006 black bear hunt.



            On Nov. 29, the Supreme Court refused to consider an emergency injunction that would have compelled the state to proceed with the 2006 hunt set to begin on December 4. The court ruled that the cancellation of the season would not cause sportsmen ‘irreparable harm.’ The bear hunt had been terminated by the state’s top environmental official.



            The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation &#40;USSAF&#41;, along with Safari Club International and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs, sought the court order to allow the hunt to go on while a lower court decides whether Department of Environmental Protection &#40;DEP&#41; Commissioner Lisa Jackson has the authority to discard the state’s black bear management plan and cancel the hunt.



            The state’s black bear management policy was adopted based upon recommendations made by wildlife professionals. It was debated by the Fish and Game Council, and reviewed and approved by the previous DEP Commissioner. The USSAF maintains that Commissioner Jackson cannot toss out the policy just because she does not agree with it.



            Sportsmen argue that Jackson’s decision was arbitrary and ignored sound science. Jackson and Gov. Jon Corzine, who indicated publicly that he opposes bear hunting, are stopping the hunt because it goes against their political beliefs, not because of scientific reasoning.



            Despite increasing bear sightings and incidents, and successful hunts in 2003 and 2005, Jackson and Gov. Corzine have put politics ahead of public safety.



            A New Jersey appellate court is scheduled to hear the full case on Jackson’s decision in late March.



            The USSAF, Safari Club International, and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs filed suit against the state on Nov. 3 to force the issuance of bear hunting permits as required by law. The groups amended the suit when Commissioner Jackson cancelled the hunt on Nov. 15.

            Comment


            • #7
              [b]<font color="0000ff"><font

              <font color="0000ff"><font size="+2">New Jersey Bear Complaints Rise, But State Still Refuses to Allow Effective Management Tool- &#40;12/22&#41;</font></font>
              New Jersey
              Join our e-mail alert list

              Black bear incidents are on the upswing in New Jersey, putting livestock, house pets, and even neighborhood children at risk. Unfortunately, the state’s top environmental official would rather support the anti-hunting movement than ensure public safety and a healthy bear population.



              According to New Jersey Fish and Game Council Acting Chairperson Jeanette Vreeland, bear complaints from Oct. 20 – Nov. 20 shot up this year from 109 &#40;2005&#41; to 158 &#40;2006&#41;, a 45 percent increase. Hunting helps control bear-human incidents, but Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Lisa Jackson demonstrated her anti-hunting bias when she discarded the state’s black bear management plan and cancelled the 2006 hunt in November.



              “Bear-human conflicts demonstrate the need for New Jersey to control its bear population by hunting,” said Tony Celebrezze, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance director of state services. “Successful bear hunts in 2003 and 2005 reduced the bear population and resulted in a decrease in bear-human incidents.”



              Recently, black bears have killed chickens, pheasants and pet rabbits. They have attacked New Jersey residents and pets, and broken into parked vehicles to find food. There is even a report that a resident has been feeding bears and the animals have begun to approach neighborhood children within 10 feet.



              The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation, along with Safari Club International and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs, has sued the state over the bear hunt. They argue that Commissioner Jackson does not have the authority to scrap the state’s approved black bear management plan and hunt.



              A New Jersey appellate court is scheduled to hear the full case on Jackson’s action in late March.



              The organizations filed suit against the state on Nov. 3 to force the issuance of bear hunting permits as required by law. The groups amended the suit when Commissioner Jackson cancelled the hunt on Nov. 15.

              Comment


              • #8
                [b]<font color="0077aa"><font

                <font color="0077aa"><font size="+2">Activists Ransack New Jersey Game Farm- </font></font>&#40;01/02&#41;
                Other
                Join our e-mail alert list


                Animal extremists vandalized a New Jersey quail farm and sealed the fate of thousands of pen-raised birds who were forced into the night without food, water or shelter.



                Members of the Animal Liberation Front, labeled by the FBI as a domestic terror group and one of the most active extremist elements in the country, issued an Internet message announcing its involvement in damaging Griggstown Quail Farm on Dec. 18. The message explained how activists clipped through the fence, cut the canopy covering three pens and flushed about 250 quail, pheasants and partridges.



                The activists’ actions resulted in the death of all of the “freed” domesticated fowl. The birds scrambled out of their cages directly into the path of oncoming traffic on a nearby highway. Those that escaped “death-by-Michelin” slowly froze to death.



                FBI spokesman Steven Siegel said, “It’s like liberating fish from an aquarium by throwing them on the floor.”



                It is estimated that the vandals actually released 2,500 birds, 10 times the number they claimed. The farm estimates loss and damages at about $80,000.

                Comment


                • #9
                  [b]<font color="ff6000"><font

                  <font color="ff6000"><font size="+2">New Jersey Governor Wastes Tax Dollars on Non-Lethal Bear Management- </font></font>&#40;03/09&#41;
                  New Jersey
                  Join our e-mail alert list


                  Instead of allowing hunters to pay the state to control New Jersey’s black bear population, Gov. Jon Corzine will throw nearly a million dollars at a non-lethal black bear management program.



                  Gov. Corzine has proposed to squander $850,000 on a public education program to teach humans and black bears that they should avoid each other. The governor is a staunch opponent of a proven, revenue-earning bear control method – bear hunting - but has proposed to fund a plan, which in no way controls the state’s increasing bear population.



                  “This is a total waste of money and it has nothing to do with managing bears,” said George Howard, executive director of the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs. “The hunt proposed by the Fish and Game Council is the only real way to control the bear population.”



                  Gov. Corzine’s plan will focus on northwestern counties – “bear country” – even though black bears have been seen in every county in the state. Officials will use rubber buckshot and dogs to chase or tree bears. The hope is that bears will associate the harassment with yard intrusion.



                  The plan also calls for the hiring of additional personnel, including wildlife technicians to remove nuisance bears and conservation officers. It begs the question – will the policy result in anything other than frustrated bears?



                  Howard sums up the issue, saying, “There are probably better uses for the money than funding anti-hunting plans. This is a real mistake.”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    June 13, 2007



                    [b]<font

                    June 13, 2007



                    <font color="0000ff"><font size="+1">Assembly Proposes to Alter New Jersey Fish and Game Council</font></font>



                    Legislation that will revamp the New Jersey Fish and Game Council will be heard in the Assembly Environment and Solid Waste Committee on June 14. The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and its allies are concerned that such legislation will simplify anti-hunters’ involvement in wildlife decision-making.



                    Assembly Bill 3275, introduced by Assemblyman Michael Panter, D- Shrewsbury, will change the make up of the Fish &amp; Game Council. It will remove the six sportsmen and three farmers who represent various geographical regions, and replace them with seven appointees recommended by the governor. The bill also directs the council to investigate non-lethal wildlife management options prior to setting hunting, fishing or trapping programs, and removes the council’s authority to consider the use and development of fish and wildlife resources for public recreation and food supply when adopting the State Fish and Game Code.



                    “We are concerned that this bill will result in the end of hunting in the long run,” said Rick Story, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance senior vice president. “The bill plays into the anti-hunting movement’s hands.”



                    Assembly Bill 3275 also proposes the transfer of the Division of Fish and Wildlife from the Department of Conservation and Economic Development to the Department of Environmental Protection. If the shift occurs, there is a risk that game management activities will take a back seat to environmental projects, and thus wildlife conservation will suffer.



                    The Assembly Environment and Solid Waste Committee hearing is June 14 in Committee Room #9, State House Annex in Trenton. New Jersey sportsmen who cannot attend should contact their Assembly members and voice opposition to AB 3275. It is particularly important to make calls today if your Assembly member is on the Environment and Solid Waste Committee &#40;see list below&#41;. Use the Legislative Action Center at www.ussportsmen.org to prepare your message.



                    Committee Member
                    Party-Hometown
                    Phone Number

                    Assemblyman John McKeon, Chairman
                    D-South Orange
                    &#40;973&#41; 275-1113

                    Assemblyman Robert Gordon, Vice-Chair
                    D-Fair Lawn
                    &#40;201&#41; 703-9779

                    Assemblyman Larry Chatzidakis
                    R-Mt. Laurel
                    &#40;856&#41; 234-8080

                    Assemblyman Charles Epps, Jr.
                    D-Jersey City
                    &#40;201&#41; 200-1820

                    Assemblyman Louis Manzo
                    D-Jersey City
                    &#40;201&#41; 309-0770

                    Assemblyman Michael Panter
                    D-Shrewsbury
                    &#40;732&#41; 544-2116

                    Assemblyman John Rooney
                    R-Emerson
                    &#40;201&#41; 967-8910




                    The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance is a national association of sportsmen and sportsmen’s organization that protects the rights of hunters, anglers and trappers in the courts, legislatures, at the ballot, in Congress and through public education programs. For more information about the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and its work, call &#40;614&#41; 888-4868 or visit its website, www.ussportsmen.org.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Court Ruling Eliminates Bear Hunting in New Jersey

                      Court Ruling Eliminates Bear Hunting in New Jersey

                      New Jersey bear hunt is history

                      October 1, 2007 (New Jersey)



                      New Jersey black bear hunting is a thing of the past for the foreseeable future.

                      On Sept. 27, the New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division essentially ended bear hunting in the state when it ruled the bear management policy invalid. From the hunting program to bear research and population monitoring, the plan has been scrapped.

                      The court decided the case based on technical grounds. It decided that the plan is akin to a Department of Environmental Protection rule, and despite it having received approval in 2005 by then DEP Commissioner Bradley Campbell and the New Jersey Fish and Game Council, the Comprehensive Black Bear Management Policy missed a few steps in the rulemaking process.

                      While the Court acknowledged that notice of opportunity to comment on the plan was published in the New Jersey Register, it concluded that the publication should have described the proposed plan in detail rather than referred the reader to a website where the full plan was available. The Court also concluded that a list of all persons commenting on the plan should have been included in the subsequent publication in the New Jersey Register announcing the adoption of the plan.

                      In the “silver lining” to the decision, the judges also commented that, if the plan had not been void for these technical reasons, Environmental Commissioner Lisa Jackson would have overstepped her authority when she unilaterally withdrew the state’s Black Bear Management Policy in 2006. In this respect, the Court agreed with the argument of the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation and other sportsmen’s groups, which had sued the state when Jackson arbitrarily discarded the approved plan, nixing the bear hunt.
                      Saltwater Fishing Articles & More by Outdoor Writer Jerry LaBella
                      http://www.jerrylabella.com/forums
                      http://jerrylabella.com

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X