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    <font color="ff0000"><font size="+2">Kansas Bill to Put More Sportsmen Afield Moves to Governor&#39;s Desk-</font></font> &#40;04/15&#41;
    Kansas
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    A Kansas bill that will help boost hunter number state has passed the legislature and moved to governor’s desk.



    The bill is part of the national Families Afield campaign. It was established by the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, National Shooting Sports Foundation, and National Wild Turkey Federation to urge states to eliminate unnecessary hunting age restrictions and ease hunter education mandates for first-time hunters.



    Senate Bill 192, which will allow the Kansas Wildlife and Parks Department to establish an apprentice hunting license, awaits Gov. Kathleen Sebelius’ signature. Under the bill, the wildlife agency may allow persons 16 years and older who have not already taken a hunter education course to become apprentice hunters for one year. The apprentice must be accompanied by a licensed adult who has satisfied his or her hunter education requirement.



    “Kansas has an apprentice youth hunting program, and the addition of an adult apprentice hunting license will open the door for even more people to safely experience and enjoy the outdoors,” said Bud Pidgeon, USSA president. “That is the key to Families Afield, safely building the sportsmen’s community.”



    Available data from states that have implemented Families Afield initiatives reveals that apprentice hunting license programs brought nearly 34,000 new hunters, both children and adults, to the field in 2006. The fact that there has not been a single hunting-related shooting incident is icing on the cake.



    Lawmakers in California, Maine, Nebraska, Oregon, and Wisconsin are also considering legislation to enact apprentice license programs and lower hunting age restrictions.



    Take Action! Kansas sportsmen should contact Gov. Kathleen Sebelius and give her the support she needs to sign SB 192. Explain that a “try before you buy” apprentice hunting program will help bolster the state’s hunter numbers and ensure its hunting traditions. Office of the Governor, Capitol, 300 SW 10th Ave., Ste. 212S, Topeka, KS 66612-1590. Call 1-877-579-6757. Sportsmen can also send messages using the USSA’s Legislative Action Center.



    Sportsmen who want to support the enactment of Families Afield laws and regulations in their states can use the Legislative Action Center on the USSA website, www.ussportsmen.org. The resource allows visitors to find and send messages to their lawmakers regarding Families Afield and other legislative issues.

  • #2
    [b]<font color="0000ff"><font

    <font color="0000ff"><font size="+2">Kansas Governor Signs Families Afield Bill
    New apprentice license to be made available for older teens and adults</font></font>


    April 27, 2007 &#40;Kansas&#41;



    Kansas has passed a law, based on the Families Afield concept, which will create an apprentice hunting license for older youth and adults.



    Families Afield is a campaign established by the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, National Shooting Sports Foundation, and National Wild Turkey Federation to eliminate unnecessary hunting age restrictions and ease hunter education mandates for first-time hunters.



    On April 18, Gov. Kathleen Sebelius signed SB 192 to allow the Kansas Wildlife and Parks Department to establish an apprentice hunting license. The new law opens the door for the wildlife agency to allow persons 16 years and older who have not already taken a hunter education course to become apprentice hunters for one year. The apprentice must be accompanied by a licensed adult who has satisfied his or her hunter education requirement.



    “Kansas has an apprentice youth hunting program, and the addition of an adult apprentice hunting license will allow even more people to safely experience and enjoy the outdoors,” said Bud Pidgeon, USSA president. “That is the key to Families Afield, safely building the sportsmen’s community.”



    Available data from states that have implemented Families Afield initiatives reveals that apprentice hunting license programs brought nearly 34,000 new hunters, both children and adults, to the field in 2006. The fact that there has not been a single hunting-related shooting incident is icing on the cake.



    Lawmakers in California, Maine, Nebraska, and Oregon are also considering legislation to enact apprentice license programs and lower hunting age restrictions.

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