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Thread: Latest IGFA News


  1. #4
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    Default Five to be enshrined into IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame

    Posted on Friday, June 22, 2007 - 06:53 pm:
    Five to be enshrined into IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame
    Ninth annual event honors contributions to the sport of fishing
    DANIA BEACH, Fla. --- The quintessential lady fly angler, the dean of outdoor writers, a man who revolutionized rod making and two extraordinary bill fishermen will be inducted into the International Game Fish Association Fishing Hall of Fame, this fall. The class of 2007 includes Homer Circle, Dr. Ruben Jaen, Gary Loomis, Capt. Peter B. Wright, and Joan Salvato Wulff,
    The highlight of the weekend of activities (Oct. 19 – 21) is the star-studded enshrinement ceremony and dinner Saturday, October 20, at the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Fla., USA. The public is invited.
    The honorees were selected for the important contributions they have made to the sport of fishing through angling achievements, literature, the arts, science, education, communication, invention or administration of fishery resources. The five inductees and their contributions are:
    Homer Circle The dean of North American outdoor writers, Homer Circle has covered the fishing scene for more than 50 years, including more than 35 years as angling editor of Sports Afield magazine. A noted bass authority, "Uncle Homer" is a tackle designer, teacher, lecturer, and has starred in more than 50 fishing films.

    Dr. Ruben Jaen A legend in Venezuelan fishing, Dr. Ruben Jaen is a pioneer of light-tackle bill fishing in that country. This cardiovascular surgeon introduced night-time sword fishing and caught the first broadbill in Caribbean waters. He has released more than 3,000 billfish and was instrumental in protecting the La Guaira Bank from commercial fishing interests. Dr. Jaen is also an author and served for 16 years on the IGFA Board of Trustees.
    Gary Loomis Gary Loomis revolutionized tackle design with his advances in graphite rod production, and G Loomis went on to become one of the most successful rod-making companies in the U.S. In 1995, Loomis launched "Fish First", a non-profit organization dedicated to restoring steelhead and salmon runs in Washington State.

    Peter B. Wright Captain Peter B. Wright is a world-renowned angler, scientist, journalist, consultant, and an advocate of circle hooks and tag-and- release. As a captain, he's fished waters all over the world, has won dozens of tournaments, and has guided numerous anglers to world records, in the process, catching more granders than anyone in history.

    Joan Salvato Wulff Joan Salvato Wulff is the most influential woman in fly fishing. A tournament caster for more than 20 years, she won 18 titles while raising casting to an art form. She continues to share her expertise in books, films, and at the Wulff School of Fly Fishing, and remains committed to the conservation of Atlantic salmon fisheries. Joan has served on the IGFA Board of Trustees since February 2001.

    There are currently 65 Hall of Fame members enshrined including Ernest Hemingway, Zane Grey, Curt Gowdy, Ted Williams, Lee Wulff, Michael and Helen Lerner, Philip Wylie, Ray Scott, Johnny Morris and John Rybovich.
    Tickets are $200 and include the cocktail reception beginning at 6 p.m., silent auction, dinner and the induction ceremony beginning at 7:30 p.m. Special sponsorships and sponsor tables are available. For reservation information please call 954-924-4222.
    The IGFA is a nonprofit, membership-supported, conservation and record-keeping organization founded in 1939 with members in over 120 countries. The association welcomes visitors to the 60,000 square foot IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame and Museum in Dania Beach, Florida. For further information, contact Lesley Arico at the International Game Fish Association, 300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, Florida 33004 Email: \mail{larico@igfa.org,larico@igfa.org} or by phone (954) 927-2628 Fax (954) 924-4299.
    ###
    EDITORS: To schedule an interview with any of the five honorees you may contact Lesley Arico at 954-924-4222 or \mail{larico@igfa.org,larico@igfa.org}, or Pete Johnson at 480-951-3654 or \mail{johnsoncom@aol.com,johnsoncom@aol.com}. Head shot photos of each of the five inductees are available upon request.

  2. #3
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Arostegui achieves his 200th I

    Arostegui achieves his 200th IGFA World Record
    First person to reach major milestone in fishing accomplishments ---

    <u>and he’s not stopping there...</u>



    DANIA BEACH, Fla., USA --- His first world record fish was caught in the summer of 1994, a 10 lb triple tail on 4 lb tippet near Flamingo in the Everglades National Park. His 200th, also on fly, came nearly 14 years later with a mullet snapper caught in Costa Rica.

    The news of Dr. Martin Arostegui, Coral Gables, Fla., USA, being the first angler to reach the International Game Fish Association milestone came on the eve of the IGFA’s World Record Achievement Awards banquet where ironically he was receiving his third consecutive grand slam as the top male angler for the most world records in freshwater &#40;24&#41;, fly &#40;24&#41; and tied for first for saltwater records &#40;11&#41; caught in 2006.

    “Dr. Arostegui’s accomplishment of achieving 200 world records is truly a remarkable feat,” said IGFA President Rob Kramer. “Through careful planning, detailed preparation and steadfast perseverance, he has taken world record game fishing to an all time high.”

    Arostegui surpassed Herb Ratner, Greensburg, Pa., who retired from the intense pursuit with 181 world records. Through it all he’s also helped set the standards for fish conservation catching, documenting, photographing and then safely releasing over 90% of the fish.

    Noted as mostly a light tackle angler especially with a fly rod, among Arostegui’s smallest fish recorded was a one pound fish &#40;the IGFA minimum accepted weight&#41; in the Unini River in the Amazon rain forest of Brazil called a pinktail chalceus.

    “We weren’t sure what it was but we entered it and through the documentation and identification it became an all-tackle record and a new entry to the IGFA’s record book,” said Arostegui.



    Holds world record for the largest fish on fly

    Last year he received international attention from the news media for his largest fish, a 385 lb lemon shark caught on fly off Key West, Fla., USA.

    Into the hour long fight, as he muscled the fish next to the boat, Arostegui said the dangerous and toothy shark attacked the hull of Capt. Ralph Delph’s 29’ craft.

    “When it opened its huge mouth, I said to myself this shark could eat half of me in one bite,” joked the diminutive retired emergency room doctor who stands 5 ft. tall and weighs 125 lbs.

    What happened next was typical of the extensive planning and preparation for which Arostegui is noted. With the help of two other nearby fishermen the huge fish was lassoed and wrestled into a specially designed eight foot long, three foot deep aerated, hydraulic live well. After an hour long ride back to Key West the pair, with the help of Delph’s son Mike who is also a prominent Keys guide, finished documenting the catch using a portable briefcase-sized scale along with a special canvas sling to cradle the fish.

    Minus the weight of the ropes and cradle the lemon shark weighed 385 lbs &#40;174.63 kg&#41;.

    They then carefully slid the shark into the water of a nearby basin and while resuscitating it -- Arostegui in the water -- measured the shark for its girth &#40;49”&#41; and length &#40;90”&#41; plus took photos.

    Looking at the photos of himself and Capt. Mike Delph standing in the water before releasing the giant fish which an hour before had been biting the boat, Arostegui laughed and said, “I don’t recommend getting this close to a lemon shark, especially in his environment.” Caught on 12 lb tippet which over-tested at the IGFA world records lab by one pound the record was moved up to 16 lb tippet, but it was still the largest fish ever caught on fly.

    The year before Arostegui caught a 247 lb lemon shark on 8 lb tippet, another record that he believes will probably be in the record books for a long time.



    Prepared purveyor of unusual and “ugly” fish

    Over this decade Arostegui began traveling the world catching some obscure, unusual and frankly “ugly” fish such as the giant snakehead in Malaysia; the prehistoric giant trahira in Suriname with sharp canine-like teeth, fly-fished the deep-waters of Alaska for yellow eyed rockfish, and targeted alligator gar in Texas.

    And sometimes he doesn’t need to travel any further than the canals of Broward County outside of Ft. Lauderdale for a snakehead, a gar along the Tamiami Trail beyond Miami’s city limits, or for a barracuda in the Keys.

    “Some of my friends make fun of me for catching all these weird fish,” smiled Arostegui. “Most of my buddies’ primary focus is the snook and tarpon. I’ve caught a lot of those and like catching them. But after catching so many I said I need to find new challenges and weird things to learn about. I kind of have a challenge of catching them on a fly rod.”

    Like a professional golfer with his bag of clubs for certain situations, Arostegui prepared numerous rods and reels for specific fishing circumstances. For a recent trip to the Kabelebo River deep in Suriname, he organized all the reels and spooled them with line that would test at the prescribed breaking strength for different records. He’ll also designs specific flies and specific weed guards along with shock tippet made of wire knotted in front of the class line or tippet.

    “There are a lot of piranhas there and when we fish, especially with bait we need to use wire or cable.

    “While in the planning stages for a trip I go on the IGFA web site and look up the line class records, the all-tackle records, the fly and the junior records &#40;when he’s accompanied by his son Martini who himself has over 80 world records at just age15&#41;, or ladies records &#40;for wife Roberta&#41; of fish in that country or region. Typically I’ll spend some 30 hours of research finding out as much about the fish and what they eat and what flies to take.“

    Just days before leaving on a spring-break trip with Martini to Suriname, their guide in the small South American country let him know to expect waters four hours upriver &#40;by dug-out canoe&#41; on the Kabelebo to be 15 ft. higher than normal.

    “That basically shut down my fly fishing efforts but I couldn’t cancel the trip because it was a meaningful event for my son and me so we did the next best thing. Because I wouldn’t have much of a chance at my record quest on fly for three specific fish &#40;giant trahira, redtail catfish and sorubim catfish we used the information gathered for Martini to pursue some records.”

    The time was well spent as Martini has four pending junior records and could break two others – his father’s – from the trip. Martini hopes to be the first junior to capture 100 records before turning 17.



    More fly fishing ahead

    Arostegui says some of the best opportunities for records are on fly in the 2, 4, and 6 lb tippet categories.

    “But those are very frustrating because sometimes just hooking the fish the line breaks.” He chuckled, “Every once in a while I swear I&#39;m not going to do that anymore and then I’m back trying to catch a bigger one on 2 lb tippet. Sometimes it’s frustrating because you can lose a lot. Everything has to go perfectly. It’s frustrating to have one big fish all day. Because you&#39;re using this light line most of the time you don&#39;t catch it. That happens a lot and as a result not a lot of people do the light line. And when you have 2 lb or 4 lb tippet it’s even more difficult than done on line class.

    “It’s so frustrating,” he repeated, “but I&#39;ve caught some very nice fish on light tippet.”

  3. #2
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame To E

    IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame To Enshrine 5 Men Eighth Annual Rolex Sponsored Event Honors Contributions To The Sport Of Fishing
    {from L to R
    Anderson, Baker, Dance, Onishi, Shedd


    DANIA BEACH, Fla. --- Five men will be inducted into the International Game Fish Association Fishing Hall of Fame, this fall. The class of 2006 includes John W. Anderson II, Charles Alma Baker, Bill Dance, Hidenori Onishi and Milton C. Shedd.
    The star-studded enshrinement ceremony and dinner, sponsored by Rolex, will be held Tuesday, October 24, at 6 p.m. at the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame &amp; Museum in Dania Beach, Fla. The public is invited.
    Each year the honorees are selected for the important contributions they have made to the sport of fishing through angling achievements, literature, the arts, science, education, invention, communication or administration of fishery resources.
    The inductees and their contributions are:
    John W. Anderson II: Jack Anderson has fished for virtually all species all over the world, including black marlin over 1,000 lb and bluefin tuna, swordfish and blue marlin over 700 lb. For five years he was a member of U.S. Team at the International Tuna Cup Matches. An IGFA Trustee since 1976, Anderson served on the Advisory Committee that was instrumental in making the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame &amp; Museum a reality. He resides in Palm Beach, Fla.

    Charles Alma Baker: It was Charles Alma Baker, a businessman and pioneer big-game angler in New Zealand, who persuaded Zane Grey to visit the country in 1926. The subsequently-published account of this trip, Tales of the Angler’s Eldorado New Zealand, described the wonderful fishing opportunities available in the country. Baker had a keen interest in tackle and worked with Hardy Brothers to design the first two-speed reel. He passed away in 1941.

    Bill Dance: Credited with catching the first bass in Ray Scott’s 1967 All-American Bass Tournament &#40;the forerunner to today’s Bassmaster Tournament Trail&#41;, Bill Dance became one of the first full-time bass pros. He went on to win eight BASS tournaments between 1968 and 1970, and is the recipient of three BASS “Angler of the Year” titles. His successful TV show, Bill Dance Outdoors, has been on the air since 1968. He lives in the Memphis, Tenn., area.

    Hidenori Onishi: One of the founders of the Japan Game Fish Association in 1979, Hank Onishi was JGFA Chairman until his death in 1998. A vocal proponent of billfish conservation, he helped inaugurate JGFA’s successful tag-and-release program in 1985. He is also recognized for popularizing the use of bird teasers. Onishi devoted many years to IGFA, as a Representative and as a member of the Board of Trustees.

    Milton C. Shedd: Milt Shedd was a leading oceanographer, a lifelong conservationist, and one of the first anglers to participate in tagging studies. He also pioneered live-bait casting for marlin, co-founded Sea World, helped create the UCLA Marine Science Center, and in the early 1970s started the white seabass hatchery program. In 1973 Shedd purchased AFTCO Manufacturing Company, today a leading manufacturer of tackle and apparel. He passed away in 2002

    Master of ceremonies Andy Mill will be joined on stage by Mark Sosin who was inducted in the 2004 IGFA Hall of Fame enshrinement class. There are currently 60 Hall of Fame members enshrined including Ernest Hemingway, Zane Grey, Curt Gowdy, Ted Williams, Lee Wulff, Michael and Helen Lerner and Philip Wylie. &#40;Please go to http://www.igfa.org/hall.asp for the complete list and bio information of the 60 members.&#41;
    The evening will include a cocktail reception, silent auction, the induction ceremony and dinner. Special sponsorships and sponsor tables are available. For reservation information please call 954-924-4222.
    Founded in 1939, the IGFA is a not for profit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rule making and record keeping. IGFA members are located in over 125 countries and territories. The IGFA welcomes visitors to its 60,000-sq.ft .interactive Fishing Hall of Fame and Museum headquartered in Dania Beach, Fla. The IGFA web site can be found at www.igfa.org.



  4. #1
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Latest IGFA News

    New IGFA world record; 385 lb shark on 16 lb tippet is now heaviest fish caught on fly



    DANIA BEACH, Fla., U.S.A. -- &#40;May 17, 2006 -- The catch-and-release of a 385 lb lemon shark on fly has officially been approved as a world record by the International Game Fish Association &#40;IGFA&#41;.

    It also becomes the heaviest documented fish caught on fly tippet.

    IGFA world records coordinator Rebecca Reynolds made the official announcement that Dr. Martin Arostegui, Coral Gables, Florida, USA had caught the heaviest fish ever documented on fly beating out a nearly 40 year old record.

    A little background on Arostegui; last year the retired Miami-area physician received a lifetime achievement award from the IGFA for over 100 world record catches through 2004 and this past March took home a grand slam of honors at the IGFA World Record Achievement Awards ceremony for the most world records in 2005 in saltwater, freshwater and on fly.

    None of his other catches has ever been this heavy on any tackle, said Arostegui.

    Continuing his relentless pace for world records with extensive travel, planning, preparation and review of the IGFA World Record Games Fishes annual and continuously updated IGFA web site of world records, Arostegui’s original plans were to catch and release a tiger shark on 20 lb tippet to beat the current 11-year old record of 220 lbs.

    Guided by Capt. Ralph Delph, Key West, Fla., and fishing near the Marquesas Keys west of Key West, Florida, Arostegui used the scent line of a filleted barracuda to entice sharks onto the flats.

    Instead of a tiger, a lemon shark smelled the scent so Arostegui switched to another fly rod with 12 lb tippet and a bright orange seven-inch long feathered fly streamer in an attempt to break another record he held. Like the tiger shark the lemon shark is a member of the whaler shark &#40;carcharhinidae&#41; family and once hooked Arostegui battled the fish for over an hour.

    As he muscled the fish next to the boat, Arostegui said the toothy shark attacked the hull of Delph’s 29 ft. Contender.

    “When it opened its huge mouth, I said to myself this shark could eat half of me in one bite,” joked the diminutive former emergency room doctor who stands 5 ft. tall and weighs 125 lbs.

    Next in a carefully orchestrated technique that Arostegui and Delph have used before, Delph gaffed the shark in the soft, fleshy part of its tail as Arostegui dropped the fly rod and lassoed the fish in front of the tail with a cleated rope.

    After a breather they enlisted the help of another flats angler and guide fishing nearby. The four men were able to wrestle the shark, while controlling its dangerous head, through the transom door into a specially designed eight foot long, three foot deep aerated, hydraulic live well. After an hour long ride back to Key West the pair, with the help of Delph’s son Mike who is also a noted Keys guide, finished documenting the catch. For that Arostegui used a portable briefcase-sized ScaleMaster II from International Weighing Systems along with a special canvas sling to cradle the fish.

    “Since I bought the scale in the Rolex/IGFA Offshore Championship tournament auction last year in Mexico, I’ve used it for documenting six other IGFA certified records, but nothing this heavy.” Minus the weight of the ropes and cradle the lemon shark weighed 385 lbs &#40;174.63 kg&#41;.

    The avid angler who has practiced catch and release on over 90% of his fish catches slid the shark into the water of a nearby basin and while resuscitating it -- himself in the water -- measured the shark for its girth &#40;49”&#41; and length &#40;90”&#41; plus took photos.

    Later, as he looked at the photos of himself and Capt. Mike Delph standing in the water before releasing the giant fish which an hour before had been biting the boat, Arostegui chuckled and said, “I don’t recommend getting this close to a lemon shark, especially in his environment.”

    At the IGFA headquarters after preliminary line testing and documentation review, Ms. Reynolds said the 12 lb tippet over tested at 13 lbs so Arostegui’s fish was entered in the 16 lb tippet line class.

    The previous record for heaviest fish on fly has been on the IGFA record books since March 15, 1967 for a 356 lb 0 oz &#40;161.48 kg&#41; goliath grouper &#40;jew fish&#41; caught by Bart Froth in Islamorada, Fla., USA, on 12 lb tippet.

    Arostegui also beat his own 257 lb 0 oz IGFA mark for a lemon shark that he recorded two years ago and also the heaviest shark on fly beating out a 353 lb. hammerhead shark caught two years ago, also in the waters near Key West, by Rick Gunion.

    Founded in 1939 the International Game Fish Association is a not-for-profit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rule making and record keeping.

    IGFA members are located in over 125 countries and territories. The IGFA welcomes visitors to its 60,000-square-foot interactive Fishing Hall of Fame and Museum in Dania Beach, Florida. The phone number at the IGFA is 954-927-2628 and e-mail is HQ@IGFA.org. The web site is www.igfa.org.

    ###



    &#40;Photo caption&#41; -- Capt. Mike Delph, left, Key West, Fla., USA and Dr. Martin Arostegui, right, of Coral Gables, Fla., hold a 385-pound lemon shark before releasing it back in Florida Bay waters. The International Game Fish Association certified the catch as a world record, Tuesday, May 16, 2006 saying it is also the largest documented fish caught on fly tackle replacing a 356 lb. goliath grouper &#40;jew fish&#41; caught in 1967. Arostegui, a retired doctor who holds more than 100 IGFA world fishing records caught the huge, toothy shark in early March near the Marquesas Keys, west of Key West, Fla. He and Capt. Ralph Delph went through elaborate methods to keep the fish alive to be weighed on certified scales, documented and released alive.

    &#40;Photo provided by the IGFA via Johnson Communications, Scottsdale, Ariz.&#41;

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