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  1. #387

    Default Cabo Bite Report Jan. 27 - Feb. 2, 2014

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Jan. 27 – Feb. 2, 2014


    WEATHER: We had mostly sunny skies this week with the highs in the mid 80's and lows in the low 60's. I heard that in a few spots it reached the mid 50's but not at the marina or at our house. We did have a bit of rain this week. Last week I mentioned that it had felt humid at the end of the week and we had seen some low black clouds that made it feel as if it would rain. We didn't have any of those low black clouds on Monday, just cloudy skies, but in the evening we did get rain, steady enough to get everything wet but not strong enough to wash the cars! Winds were from the north-north-east at the end of the week.

    WATER: We did have great water conditions once again with the exception of early in the week on the Pacific side in the afternoons. During that time frame for the first three days the winds blew fairly strong causing some very choppy conditions up past the lighthouse and offshore. Of course the afternoons are when most boats were coming back to the marina so it was a downhill, downwind run and not to uncomfortable. The rest of the time the seas on the Pacific side were in the 1-4 foot range and water temperatures were 74 early in the week, slowly dropping to 70-71 degrees by the end of the week. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water was smooth, almost like a pool most of the week with swells 1-2 feet and wind riffles in the afternoons. The water temperature dropped on this side as well with water toward the shore from the 95 spot and the 1150 going from 74 degrees to 72-71 degrees, and the water on the Gorda Bank dropping from 76 degrees at the start of the week to 74 at the end of the week.

    BAIT: There was no lack of bait this week and you could buy as many Mackerel and Caballito as you wanted for the usual $3 each. Still no Sardinas that I was aware of.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: I was a bit surprised this week that the action on Striped Marlin slowed down a bit, I was sure that the new moon phase would help the bite. Instead, we were seeing between 65-70% of our anglers getting hooked into and releasing a Striped Marlin. The fish have also started to appear in areas other than on the Pacific side at the high spots, we were finding them on the Cortez side as well, not in any great numbers, but a stronger showing than we had been seeing the week before. The cooling water may have something to do with this as Striped Marlin seem to prefer water in the 70-72 degree range. With the fish scattered out a bit more, trolling became the preferred method of finding a Marlin. Spotting a tailing fish then running to it and tossing a bait in front worked better than sitting on the high spots drifting a live bait, and much better than slow trolling a live bait. The fish also were not shy about slamming a trolled lure!

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Inside one day and outside the next, you were never sure where the Tuna would appear on a daily basis. The only sure thing was the more water you covered the better chance you had of getting into a good tuna bite. Boats found these fish from a mile off the beach up by Los Arcos to 35 miles out at 210 degrees, and almost all of them were associated with Porpoise. Cedar plugs and dark colored hootchies worked well, and I had a client bring down some cedar plug shapes made from clear acrylic with plenty of silver flash in them and they were amazing, caught so many Tuna on these things that they ended up releasing all the fish under 15 pounds and still limited out in 90 minutes. Of course with the action that hot and heavy mistakes were made. They were using light 30 pound leader and they ended up loosing all three lures when the leader chaffed through. They reported that almost 80% of the bites were on these three lures, guess I will have to get some of these!

    DORADO: Dorado continued to be the mainstay of the charter fleet this week as both the offshore cruisers and the inshore fishermen were getting Dorado in the fish box. Most of the fish were off the beach between ½ mile and three miles on the Pacific side, but there were many of them caught on the Cortez side off the beach the same distance. My guess would be that 40% of the boats that got into Dorado managed to catch the legal limit of two fish per angler, the rest of the boats managed to get at least a few, even if they were not looking for them. None of the fish I saw were large with their weight running between 6 and 10 pounds with a few fish in the 15 pound category. Light colored lures and live bait were the key to the Dorado, and of course if you saw Frigate birds working it was either over Dorado (most common) or on Striped Marlin.

    WAHOO: To tell the truth I did not see any wahoo this week, but did hear of some decent ones caught on the Cortez side of the Cape. Boats working the rocks in front of Gray Rock and the drop-off along the cliffs between Santa Maria and Chileano Bay as well as the 30 fathom line off of Palmilla were getting an occasional bite from fish that were reported to be as large as 45 pounds. There were a few smaller fish reported from the Pacific side but I am not sure which area they were found.

    INSHORE: Sierra are still the fish of the week for the inshore fishermen as well as the surf fishermen tossing lures from the beach. The fish are mostly between 4 and 6 pounds with a few in the 10 pound class. The favorite areas have been off the de-sal plant just to the north of the lighthouse and the beach off of Playa Grande. A few boats are still running up to Migraino for the Sierra, getting lots of fish and then working three miles out for Marlin, Dorado and Tuna on the downhill return. Fishing for the Snapper in amongst the rocks has been an on-off experience with early in the week being “off” due to the slightly larger seas encountered. Perhaps the coming full moon will bring more fish in. If it does, please remember to limit your catch, don't catch your limit. In the spring during the full moon the heavy concentrations of Snapper (and Grouper)you encounter are spawning aggregations, and while your crew may want to catch every fish they can, remember that it's your charter and your call as when to stop.

    FISH RECIPE: This week we did a spicy fish dish that I adapted from a recipe for General Tso's Chicken. Start with 2 pounds of any boneless fish fillet and cube it into 1 ½ inch cubes. Marinate it for four hours in a mix of the white of 1 egg, a dash of salt and pepper, 1 teaspoon of minced fresh ginger (frozen will work if that's all you have, just grate it instead of mincing it) and one teaspoon of corn starch. I put all the ingredients in a gallon zip-lock and shake it around for a few minutes then put the fish in and shake it again, then place it in the fridge. While it is marinating I made a sauce of 1 ½ tablespoon of soy sauce, 3 table spoons of sugar, 2 table spoons of rice-wine vinegar, 1 tablespoon of sesame oil, 1 tablespoon of hoisin sauce, 1 tablespoon of chicken broth and 1 tablespoon of sherry (I used tawny port instead). Once the fish has marinated put four or five cups of fresh oil in a large pot and heat it until its smoking, then dip in the fish pieces three or four at a time and cook for 1 minute, then remove to some paper towels to drain. Once all the fish is cooked take some of the oil and put it in a large skillet, then place about two tablespoons of minced ginger, one green onion white section thinly sliced, two minced garlic cloves and about three tablespoons of dried red chile flakes in the oil and saute for about 1 minute. Next add the sauce, then the fish and toss and stir until the fish is well coated. Serve this on a bed of freshly cooked rice! Just in case you don't know, rice is simple. Boil 2 cups of lightly salted water. When it comes to a boil add 1 cup of rice and stir quickly. When it returns to a boil turn it down to a simmer and cover. Let simmer for 20 minutes then remove from the heat. After five minutes off the heat remove the lid and stir the rice, then replace the lid. Easy peasy.

    NOTES: Fish, Sun, Dolphin, Whales, Beaches and Booze! Cabo San Lucas! Oh and since it's Super Bowl Sunday, GO SEAHAWKS!!!!!

    Often copied, never duplicated, no plagiarism, all original, and on line for the past 13 years, I hope you enjoy my weekly reports!
    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  2. #386

    Default Cabo Fish Report Jan. 20 - 26, 2014

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Jan. 20 - 26, 2014


    WEATHER: We had partly cloudy skies this week as some high cloud cover moved in early and then cleared on Wednesday, then during the later part of the week some of those clouds that you just know are going to let loose with a little rain but just end up teasing you moved in then out of our area by Saturday. The weekend was mostly sunny with some early morning cloud cover. Highs for the week were in the low 80's while the lows were a balmy 64-65 degrees with a bit of humidity.
    WATER: Water conditions on the Sea of Cortez in our area were very good with swells small at 1-3 feet, the water temperature 74 degrees within 6 miles of the beach and 76 degrees outside of that. Strangely enough, the warmer water was a bit more off-color than the cooler water. Up farther on the Cortez side the wind began to punish anglers, and if you went north of Punta Gorda you had to be ready for a bumpy ride. On the Pacific side of the Cape the week started with swells at 1-3 feet and as the week progressed so did the swells. They were not closely spaced but by this morning we were seeing 4-6 foot swells causing a surf of 8-12 feet. We are thankful that the wind has remained down and there has been very little wind chop and swell on top of this ground swell. The water temperature on the Pacific side has remained in the 76 degree range all week with slightly cooler water showing to the north of the Golden Gate Banks. The water has also been a clean blue color almost everywhere, not a deep purple summer color, but nice and clean.
    BAIT: Plenty of both Mackerel and Caballito were available this week at the normal $3 per bait. I did not hear of any Sardinas being available.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: I'm not going to blow smoke and say the fishing was outstanding for Striped Marlin this week, but it improved a bit over what we were seeing last week. Every boat that wished to get a Striped Marlin was able to get at least one release, and several boats had multiple releases, up to six per trip. It was all about being where the concentrations were and having the right bait. As was the case last week, the majority of the fish were on top of the Golden Gate Bank and toward the inside of there, and they re-grouped a bit after the strong currents we had last week. Boats that had Mackerel in good condition did well, and those that were able to catch some on the grounds and “match the hatch” so to speak, did very well. The fish at the Gate were feeding on a mix of Mackerel and very large Sardinas. Slow trolling live bait was the best method and deep dropping bait while drifting came in second place as a producer of fish. There were also Striped Marlin found in other areas, namely on the ridge between the Golden Gate high spot and the high spots on the San Jaime Bank, the west side of the canyon. The fish were much more scattered, but finding the tailing fish very often resulted in a hookup when the bait was presented properly. Elsewhere the Marlin were even more scattered, but when found could often be enticed into striking a trolled lure or a live bait dropped back.

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: The excitement continued this week as the Yellowfin Tuna that showed up have continued to make their presence known by way of filling the fish boxes! The majority of these fish actually weighed between 10 and 15 pounds, but there were a few schools that held 20-25 pound Tuna. There were also a couple found that had fish to 60-80 pounds on them, but these were few and far between. The larger fish were often fooled into biting by using a kite to get the lures and bait far from the boat and the prop noise. If you happened to be the first on the school, setting two lines out at 250 yards (that's way back there folks, at a half spool or more, and many crews won't do it) and making a pass on the front of the school also resulted in some of these larger fish as the lures did not get there until well after the boat had gone. For the footballs, cedar plugs and small feathers to three inches worked great, and a few fly-fishermen had a fantastic time blind casting while the crew chummed up some fish with chopped up bait. It was not hard to limit out on these fish this week, and as usual, many boats seemed to forget that there is a legal limit on how many fish you are allowed to keep (five Tuna per angler).

    DORADO: We continue to see Dorado come in every day and I am surprised that the fishing has remained as good as it has. I expect to still be catching a few this time of year, but we have been seeing a few limits coming in this week on Dorado (legal limit is two per angler). Most of the fish have been found on the Pacific side from the shoreline out to about three miles, but there have also been fish on the Cortez side out to about two miles. Most of these fish have been in the 10 pound class but an occasional fish to 18 pounds has been in the mix as well.

    WAHOO: I must have missed some wonderful Wahoo action the week before last as I saw several reports that the bite on these fish had been hot. On last weeks report I said that there had been a few scattered small fish but no large ones, then I was contacted by several fishermen who had been reading other reports and they informed me that there had been quite a few large Wahoo caught. All I can say is that I won't write about it unless I see the fish or trust who is telling me about their fish, so apparently I missed that action. This past week there were some smaller Wahoo found once again and the action was inshore off of the high spots and points on the Pacific side. A few boats that left early and made passes at Gray Rock at gray light also racked up a few of these speedsters, but nothing I heard of was over 30 pounds.

    INSHORE: Still the inshore fish of the week, Sierra were the primary target of the Pangas that fished inshore this week. Finding a school was not too difficult, and once you found it getting the fish to bite was fairly easy. It really helps the enjoyment of catching these little guys to match the size of the gear to the size of the fish. Most of the Pangas carry lighter gear, and we have several that carry fly rods as well, so if the numbers are not as important as the action, check to see what equipment your boat has before going for these guys. Reeling in a couple of 4 pound Sierra on #50 gear is not a lot of fun, but at least you get fish in the boat and have something to take home. Right? Hmm.... oh, there are also Snapper and Grouper to be found inshore. The snapper will be right in the rocks, and you are likely to loose a few rigs trying to get them, but they are great eating and it is fun to work them out of the rock piles! The Grouper have been caught by dropping a live bait to within 5 feet of the bottom in 60 to 150 feet of water. Make sure your drag is down as heavy as the gear can take for both the Snapper and Grouper, you need to keep them out of the rocks! Along with these fish, there are a few small Yellowtail showing up, hopefully soon we will be seeing a stronger showing of these gear busting brutes, and a slightly larger class of fish. Many of the Pangas caught a few Sierra for their anglers and then went out for the Yellowfin Tuna and did very well, often getting in a Striped Marlin as well.

    FISH RECIPE: This week I used left-over grilled Dorado and just made fish sandwiches instead of ham sandwiches. Same idea, just a different protein, but it helps if you use something besides plain white bread. I like using the large croissants from Costco.

    NOTES: Plenty of fish to catch, Whales and Dolphin to see, great water conditions and light crowds! We need to enjoy this while we can because Spring Break is coming soon and things are going to get hectic! This weeks report was written to the music of Brian Flynn and his band. In this case it consisted of Mauricio on the Keyboards, Base and Drums and Brian's old partner Lulu Small on the guitar and vocals. Got to see them live on Tuesday at Tanga-Tanga, Puerto Parisio Marina side and at the Cabo Lounge. They used to play together 15 years ago, it sure was fine to hear them now! Until next week, tight lines!

    Often copied, never duplicated, no plagiarism, all original, and on line for the past 13 years, I hope you enjoy my weekly reports!

    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  3. #385

    Default Cabo Bite Report Jan. 13-19, 2014

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Jan. 13 - 19, 2014


    WEATHER: A repeat of last weeks weather was in store for those of us who live here as well as for our visitors. A very cool, for us at least, early morning low in the mid 50's greeted all anglers when they arrived at the marina. Coats, or at least a nice sweatshirt was worn by those with thin blood but I did see a couple of crazy people walking around in tee shirts and shorts. Must have been freezing where they came from! Our afternoons were a very comfortable mid-80's experience every day, and the skies remained sunny until this weekend. High clouds moved in and while the temperatures did not change much, I kept thinking we were going to get rain. Of course we had no rain, the wrong kind of clouds for that, but the hope was there.

    WATER: Water temperatures on the Pacific side of the Cape were in the 74-75 degree range between the San Jaime/Golden Gate Banks and the shoreline while the water on top of the banks and to the west of them was cooler by a degree. In the Sea of Cortez we had water temperatures a slight bit higher, averaging just one degree more, The water on the Pacific side appeared cleaner as well, most of the area showing a clean blue color while on the Cortez side it was just barely tinged with green. The biggest change we saw this week was to the immediate south of the Cape. The currents were strong enough this week that a 2 degree temperature break formed about 30 to 40 miles to the south and southwest of the arch. The cool water on the inside of this break (this cool water formed a “V” at first, with warmer water on both sides) was 74 degrees and the warmer water at both edges was 76 degrees.

    BAIT: Plenty of both Mackerel and Caballito were available this week at the normal $3 per bait.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: Everyone saw a drop in the Marlin bite this week as the currents ran stronger and the baitfish scattered a bit. Combine that with the full moon and we were not too surprised at this. It made every Marlin caught all the more desirable though, and a few boats were lucky enough to release several per trip. With the strong current and scattered bait, trolling while looking for tailing fish to throw bait at was a better method than soaking a live bait deep on the high spots. The better areas to fish for Marlin were still on the Pacific side and to the northern edge of our daily fishing area. Specificly, around and to the inside of the Golden Gate Bank offered more opportunities to hook a billfish than other areas. Marlin sizes were ranging from 90 pounds to 180 pounds with an average of 110 pounds.

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: We were all excited the week before last when suddenly the catches of Yellowfin Tuna increased from almost nil to almost limits. Combined with the fact that the fish were not too far away and we were almost partying on the docks. Well, things changed a bit and the fish moved away. Not out of reach, but you needed to dedicate an entire day to fishing for them as it took a while to get out 30 to 40 miles and then find the porpoise pods the Yellowfin were associated with. Boats that made the trip reported excellent fishing for Yellowfin between 12 and 25 pounds with a few larger fish to 45 pounds in the mix. The only problem with going out there was that you needed to be early on the fish, boats that appeared later did not have as good of luck as the early arrivals. And, from all the reports I received, there were no other species found on the way out there or on the way back except for an occasional Striped Marlin. As you may have guessed, this was around the edges of that temperature break I mentioned earlier.

    DORADO: Dorado continued to be caught by boats working near the shoreline, but there were fewer of them this week and the average size was around 12 pounds, down a pound or two from last weeks average. We had one client out this week who managed to catch two Dorado on the fly rod, chumming to get them close enough to cast to, and this was on the Cortez side of the Cape, around the Cabo Del Sol area. So it appears that there are some fish around in the warmer Cortez water as well now. With the water cleaning up a bit in this area, there may be a bit more effort put in by the local fleet to work the waters around the 1150 and the Seamount.

    WAHOO: I did hear of a few boats that did well on Wahoo this week, and I am not too surprised since we had a full moon. However, having said that, these were boats that focused on the Wahoo. For the large majority of boats, Wahoo were an incidental catch, if they had a strike at all. The Wahoo that were caught were found in their usual haunts, along the edge of drop-offs and on the top of underwater pinnacles.

    INSHORE: Sierra, Sierra and more Sierra. If you wanted to catch Sierra there was almost a guarantee offered by the Panga Captains! Of course you had to put in a bit more effort than last week as the currents moved the Sardinas around and the Sierra moved with them. The bait broke up into smaller schools and the Sierra followed suit, becoming scattered up and down the coast and not heavily concentrated in one area like they were last week. Trolling hootchies and watching for fish breaking the surface was the key, and once you found where there were fish, chumming and fishing with strip baits resulted in fish that were slightly larger than those caught on the hootchies. A few Roosterfish as well as Grouper and Snapper were found, and plenty of Skipjack bit on the hootchies as well.

    FISH RECIPE: Keep it simple! A dorado fillet with salt and pepper on an oiled grill cooked perfectly, and then a sauce I made with peach marmalade, white wine and crushed hot peppers drizzled on top. Serve that up with some garlic mashed potatoes and a glass of white wine made you think you were in a five star restaurant!

    NOTES: I have yet to receive a reply from the CONAPESCA San Diego office concering the price increase on fishing licenses, so basicly “it is what it is” and they are $181 pesos for a daily license at the dock. Lots of whales are being seen on the fishing trips, we are in the middle of whale season with plenty of Gray Whales and Humpback Whales spouting and breaching all over the place. This weeks report was written to the music of Hayes Carll on his CD “Little Rock”. Until next week, tight lines!
    Often copied, never duplicated, no plagiarism, all original, and on line for the past 13 years, I hope you enjoy my weekly reports!
    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  4. #384

    Default Cabo Bite Report Jan. 6 - 12, 2014

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Jan. 6 - 12, 2014


    WEATHER: We had wonderful weather this week with our lows in the high 50's and the highs in the mid 80's. The skies remained mostly sunny except for a bit of overcast on Saturday and while the wind did blow a bit in the evenings it was pretty nice and mellow during the daytime. No rain of course!

    WATER: Water temperatures on the Sea of Cortez side were 73-74 degrees except for some warm water around the 1150 and Seamount area where it warmed up a bit to 74-75 degrees. The water was a bit off-color in the 73-74 degree area. Surface conditions on the side were very good with swells small at 1-3 feet and no wind chop until either the late afternoon or if you went up past Punta Gorda to the north. On the Pacific side of the peninsula the water was 73-74 degree almost anywhere you went, and the water was a lot cleaner than the Sea of Cortez side. Surface conditions were great as well with swells at 2-4 feet but spaced far apart. Around mid-afternoon during the later part of the week the wind picked up a bit and made for some choppy conditions, but there was no issue with the fishing being affected.

    BAIT: There are more Mackerel available than there were last week and this trend should continue as the water becomes cooler every week. A mix of Mackerel and Caballito were the normal bait purchase this week. The price continued to be steady at $3 U.S. Per bait, and if the boat you were on was buying from the same bait boat all the time, often a bag or chunk of ice was included in the purchase.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: The concentration of Striped Marlin that we had at the lighthouse ledge on the Pacific side has either been thinned out due to the fishing pressure or has moved off to follow the bait! While there are still some Striped Marlin being caught there, the boats have been finding more and more fish on the Golden Gate and off of the point at El Arco. Remember last weeks report when I said that there were good numbers being found at the Golden Gate? Well, now it is beginning to look like the lighthouse did last week with up to 50 boats working it by drifting live baits, some deep and some on the surface, or by slow trolling live bait and rigged ballyhoo or by trolling lures. I listed those techniques in order of effectiveness. The same methods were being used at El Arco as well, with good results. If Marlin is your target, the Gate is the place to concentrate on right now. Some of the Striped Marlin being caught are quite large, we had one client release one fish he said was around 200 pounds and another that was around 110 pounds. This is the typical size range, with outliers being fish over 180 pounds and under 80 pounds. I will soapbox once again though about using circle hooks for fishing live bait deep for Marlin. Please practice “catch and release” on our Striped Marlin, not “catch and fillet”. While there seem to be large numbers of these fish out there, there are not infinite numbers of them. Using a “J” hook with deep dropped live bait is almost 100% certain to gut hook the fish, and these fish have a very low survival rate post release. As a matter of fact, studies have shown that if a Striped Marlin is bleeding when it is released there is 97% mortality. With a circle hook, the hook will not catch on the fish until it is pulled to the corner of the jaw, where its shape is designed to dig in via a cam-like action. There is no need to “set” the hook with violent swings on the rod, this type of hook-setting will instead jerk the circle hook out of the fish. The best method is to slowly apply increasing pressure until the hook is brought to the corner of the jaw, where it will then lodge. This is perfect for those deep drops where you never know a fish has hooked up until well after it has eaten the bait. Make sure you stop by one for the local tackle supply stores and buy a dozen on these circle hooks to take on your boat, and if the crew decides to use the deep drop or “bottom fishing” technique, insist they use the circle hooks you have brought. Thank you very much!

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Yay! I guess our crossed fingers and prayers have been answered, at least for this week. We had some great Tuna action as the fish were finally found, some 20 miles to the south and some near the San Jaime Banks, even a few inside the Banks areas. Most of the fish were 12-18 pounds with a few pushing 30 pounds. I even heard of a few boats catching fish in the 50-80 pound class. It doesn't really matter to me, I am just glad they finally showed up! Boats that got into the Yellowfin were often getting limits for their anglers (5 fish per angler), and if there was just one angler on board, having all five lines go off at once resulted in a circus act! Feathered lures, hootchies and cedar plugs worked great on the football sized fish as well as fish to 30 pounds, but most of the larger fish were caught on live bait dropped well ahead of an approaching school. Almost all of these fish were associated with porpoise, so seeing the porpoise splash in the distance was a great way to find the fish, as was seeing small concentrations of birds working one area.

    DORADO: While Dorado continue to be caught by boats fishing the Pacific side of the Cape, the fish have spread out and the bite seems to be tapering off a bit. Instead of limiting out almost every trip (2 fish limit per angler), many of the boats are returning with just 1 or 2 Dorado in total. The water withing a mile of the beach on the Pacific side is still the most productive area to work, and the better catches are by boats that are willing to do something a bit different, slow trolling live bait on a down-rigger. The problem with this method of course, is that you have to find the fish first. Trolling at a slightly higher speed than normal is one way, moving through the water at 9 knots instead of 7 knots covers a bit more area, but seeing another boat fighting or boating a Dorado is just as good (except they are the one getting that first fish).

    WAHOO: There were a few small Wahoo caught this week by boats working near shore for Dorado on the Pacific side. The few fish I heard of were caught up past the Migraino area in 200 feet of water.

    INSHORE: Sierra were still the inshore fish of the week as boats fishing for them were certain to catch at least a few. The schools that we had seen the week before up off of Migraino have split up, and now there are scattered small schools found all up and down the coastline. Fishing from just outside the surf break to 200 feet of water and watching for bait (sardinas for the most part) popping on the surface put you in the zone. Once the schools were found a few passes with hootchies determined the next step. If the fish would bite the hootchies it was great, if not, then you tried strip baits drifted through the same area. This method generally resulted in slightly larger fish. Of, by the way, the larger Sierra sometimes have parasites in the meat, so check them carefully when they have been filleted. Often the cleaning station guys will let you know if parasites are present. There have been very few Roosterfish found, and those that have been caught have been small. A few Yellowtail have been caught, but not in numbers large enough to have them as a targeted species. Toss in a few Snapper to 10 pounds and Grouper to 20 pounds and you have our inshore fishing report!

    FISH RECIPE: This week it's about shrimp! We are lucky to have some of the best shrimp in Mexico available to us, its caught up in Mag Bay and we can get it fresh. I like to take the shell-on tails and saute them for about two minutes in butter, then splash in some white wine, cook while agitating the pan for another minute, then adding a splash of tequila and some red pepper flakes, cooking for another 30 seconds. Remove them from the pan and serve them with white rice that you have drizzled the remaining saute fluids on. Peel and enjoy!

    NOTES: I posted an interim report this week about the increase in fishing license prices. If you did not read it, then be aware, at the dock the agents of CONAPESCA are now charging $181 pesos for a one day license. If you pay in dollars it is $18 U.S. Last week I paid $179 pesos, and it was printed on the license. The week before it was $175 pesos, and was printed on the license. I have sent a letter (actually an e-mail) to the CONAPESCA office in San Diego asking them what the licenses are supposed to cost as many people have informed me that they are able to buy one day licenses from them for only $9.25 U.S. I have not had a reply yet, but will have news by next weeks report. On a lighter note, if you are fishing you are seeing whales and porpoise as well, but if you are out whale watching you are not fishing. So, if you want to do some whale watching, why not charter a fishing boat and do both? This weeks report was written to the music of Jack Johnson and Friends on the 2012 album “Jack Johnson and Friends – Best of Kokua Festival” on Brushfire Records. If you have never heard this, you deserve a treat! Until next week, Tight Lines!

    Often copied, never duplicated, no plagiarism, all original, and on line for the past 13 years, I hope you enjoy my weekly reports!

    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  5. #383

    Default Cabo Bite Report Dec. 30, 2013 - Jan. 5, 2014

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec. 30, 2013 – Jan. 5, 2014


    WEATHER: Unlike those of you living in the north, our weather remained very comfortable this week. Our daily highs were in the mid to high 80's and the nighttime lows averaged 67 degrees with a low in town of 62 degrees. The wind shifted during the week, coming from the north at the start of the week and then shifting and coming from the northeast mid-week and then back from the north again at the end of the week. We had partly cloudy skies with a high overcast on Saturday, but the rest of the week was mostly sunny.
    WATER: The water on the Sea of Cortez side was cooler than that on the Pacific side, and off-color in comparison as well. Temperatures ranged from 71 degrees up by Punta Gorda to 73 degrees off of Gray Rock while on the Pacific side it was 74 degrees between the San Jaime / Golden Gate Banks line-up and the shoreline, and 75 degrees on the banks and to the west. The offshore water on the Pacific side was cleaner as well. Surface conditions to the northern side of our fishing range on the Pacific were rough and choppy for the later part of the week, but very calm and smooth on the Cortez side. In between these extremes we had slightly choppy conditions in the afternoons when the winds picked up, but calm conditions in the mornings.
    BAIT: No change in bait availability again, with Caballito and a few Mackerel making up the choice of live baits this past week, and you were lucky to get the Mackerel. The price was the normal $3 each. There were also frozen Ballyhoo at $3 each.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: There are still a few Blue Marlin around, or maybe Black Marlin, as the fish was not identified except for the fact that it was a Marlin. Last Sunday one of the local charter boats tossed a live bait in front of a Marlin only to have it engulfed by a different fish entirely, and they proceeded to fight this big Marlin for the next 6 ½ hours before the line broke. This occurred only 5 miles off the entrance to San Lucas Bay! For the rest of the boats the Striped Marlin action was very consistent, with almost every boat that wanted to catch one able to do so, and some boats had multiple fish released. The favorite location was on the ledge off the lighthouse on the Pacific side, and the preferred method was “bottom fishing”. This involves tying on a lead weight of between 5 and 15 ounces and dropping a live bait down toward the bottom. The water depth is between 200 and 300 feet and several lines are set at staggered depth. The boat then drifts over the ledge, or along the current break until a bite occurs or the drift takes them off the ledge. The local boats love this as it is very effective and really saves on the cost of fuel. The only issue I have is that for me at least, it is very boring, and most of the boat use “j” hooks when fishing this way. Since the bait is so far down, and there is a large bend in the line caused by both the current and the boat moving, the first bite is very had to discern. This means the fish has plenty of time to swallow the bait, and often the first sign that one is hooked up is seeing it jumping in the distance. If you use a circle hook, the hook will slide to the corner of the jaw as the fish moves away and will not gut hook and injure the Marlin like a “j” hook will. If you are looking for Marlin, please ask your crew to use circle hooks if they are planning to “bottom fish” for Marlin, and it helps if you bring some along. All the tackle store here sell them, and they are not very expensive. Thank you! Striped Marlin have also been concentrating on the Golden Gate Bank, and there has been less boat pressure there due to it being 23 miles away instead of just 6 miles away like the lighthouse ledge. The water there has been choppier as well, but the fact that there are fewer boats makes it easier to stay on top of the high spot.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: While still slow, the pick has slowly improved this week with a few boats able to find porpoise pods with Yellowfin associated with the pod. Action was found at 35 miles to the southwest, just inside the Jaime Banks and just offshore of the Migraino area in small pods of porpoise. These fish are footballs at 6-12 pounds, but hopefully a signal of action to come. Hootchies in dark colors that were jigged while trolling worked the best on these footballs with cedar plugs coming in as the second best lure.













    DORADO: Continuing to show up in the catch has been Dorado, averaging 10 pounds with occasional specimens to 20 pounds. On the Pacific side of the Cape from the Arch to Todo Santos, the better concentrations have been toward the northern section of this fishing area, but there have been hot-spots everywhere this week as the water remains a bit warmer here and the fish follow the bait. It may seem as if I am repeating myself, but dropping back a live bait or strip bait behind a hooked fish remains the best way to get multiple hook-ups on Dorado. Don't remove the first fish from the water until you have tried to attract a second one!
    WAHOO: Once again I heard of a few Wahoo being caught, but no big numbers and no big fish. There was an occasional strike in the early morning hours at the lighthouse ledge and along the drop-off outside Diamante.
    INSHORE: Continuing their status as fish of the week, the diminutive but tasty Sierra maintained a strong presence along the shoreline on the Pacific side of the Cape. The largest concentrations of these sharp-toothed critters was in 30-120 feet of water from the Los Arcos area to Migraino beach, but there were scattered fish all along the shoreline. These concentrations were working schools of Sardines, and you could spot the feeding action by closely watching the water for the small boils and splashes. The majority of Sierra were small at 3-4 pounds, but there were larger fish found, a few to 9 pounds. If you matched the tackle to the fish, the fight was great, if the gear was too heavy you were just winching them in. For those of you who like to fly fish and have not done any saltwater fly-fishing before, these are the perfect species to try your luck on, just remember that a wire bite tippet is needed, and bring plenty of flies!
    FISH RECIPE: Last week I posted up my method for making fish fingers and mentioned that I like them with tarter sauce. A lot of you asked how I make mine, so that is my recipe for this week. Once again, I go with the idea that simple is best! Take some Mayonnaise (about a cup) some Mustard (a good squirt of the yellow stuff, maybe a tablespoon or so) some pickle relish (the kind you use on hotdogs, I like the sweet relish myself, about double the amount of mustard you used), a sprinkling of garlic powder or salt (I prefer the garlic salt, maybe a ½ teaspoon) and a few dashes of Worcestershire (sp) sauce (about a tablespoon) and mix it all up. Add a bit more of whatever you think it needs and you are good to go!
    NOTES: I feel bad for all of you that are experiencing the aftereffects of the most recent winter storm, and now you have “record breaking” low temperatures coming your way. We will be watching the wild card games today from the comfort of an open air sports bar, sipping a cold one in 80 degree weather. If you could get a flight you could join us next Saturday for the Seahawks-Saints game. Go SEAHAWKS! Lets see, there are lots of whales to be seen, this is the best time of year to go whale watching, so there is an added incentive to get your spouse to agree its time to get away, that is, if you can get a flight! Also, please be aware that the taxes in Baja California, both Norte and Sur, have been raised from 11% to 16% in order to match those of the rest of the country. Prices have gone up a bit folks! This weeks report was written to the music of Ricky Scaggs, man, can that guy play a mandolin or what? Until next week, tight lines!







    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  6. #382

    Smile Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec. 23 - 29, 2013


    WEATHER: We had beautiful weather this week as it was sunny every day! Not what most of you had for Christmas I know, but we loved it. Our highs during the week were in the mid 80's while the lows were in the low 60's. This morning at 4:30 it was 62 degrees, the same as yesterday.
    WATER: At the end of the week the water in the Sea of Cortez continued to be a bit off-color and greenish while being in the 73-73 degree range. On the Pacific side the water was a bit warmer with 77 degrees being seen about halfway between here and Todo Santos and it slowly dropping to 73 degrees off of the lighthouse, with an occasional patch of 74 degree water. This water was cleaner as well. Surface conditions were great on the Pacific with swells between 2 and 4 feet and the prevailing wind early in the week was light and from the northwest. At the end of the week it shifted and blew out of the north. This caused some rough water on the Sea of Cortez side as the winds wrapped around the peninsula and came from the east, something we don't often see. As I write this the wind is from the north at about 4 MPH, very nice conditions.
    BAIT: Caballito and a few Mackerel make up the choice of live baits this past week, and you were lucky to get the Mackerel. The price was the normal $3 each. There were also frozen Ballyhoo at $3 each.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: There was no real change in the Striped Marlin situation this week as the concentration of fish appeared to be on the ledge off the Pacific lighthouse. With 50 boats working the area the fish were getting pounded but there were plenty caught. For those who focused on the area the results were between one and four fish released (and some killed unfortunately) per boat. The favored method was once again dropping a weighted line with a live bait on the end down into the water column. Most boats dropped two baits, one almost to the bottom in 250 feet of water and another at 120 feet and had a third bait on the surface, or just under it. I would like to once again stress that if you plan on releasing you're Marlin (PLEASE release them!) then let your crew know your plans ahead of time so there is no confusion about what to do with the fish when it comes boat side. Take a picture of the fish in the water (take a lot of them if you have digital) then buy a release flag and mount the picture and the flag in a frame for a trophy. There is NO NEED to KILL the Marlin if you want a replica made. All you need is an estimated length. Once again, there is NO NEED to KILL the MARLIN! Ask the crew to use circle hooks when dropping bait down deep, it helps to keep the Marlin from becoming gut hooked, and the hook-up ratio is just as good as if you were using “j” hooks.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: I'm almost out of patience. These fish have still not shown up in any numbers and usually by this time of year they make up 50% of the catch. There are a few being caught, but my guess is that only 5% of the boats are getting any, and they are having to cover a lot of water to find them.
    DORADO: I am slightly amazed that these fish are still hanging around, but the water on the Pacific side has not gotten really chilly yet. I was out on Friday and we worked the area off of Pedregal for the morning and got our limit of fish between 8 and 18 pounds with the larger fish coming early and on live bait trolled off a down-rigger. Most boats were getting a few as I did see plenty of flags flying for these fish at the end of the day. Smaller Mackerel were working just fine for these fish and we had a Marlin bite as well, even though we were several miles from the concentration of those fish.
    WAHOO: I heard of a couple of Wahoo being caught but not many, and don't know where they were found. It was second or third had information anyway, I did not talk to anyone who had actually caught one themselves.
    INSHORE: Sierra had to be fish of the week this week as anyone who wanted could get limits on these fish, ranging in size from 2 to 8 pounds. There were fish scattered all along the Pacific coastline but the big concentrations were up off of the Marguerite area, inside the Golden Gate Banks. The fish were concentrated in the area because of big schools of Sardines. Hootchies in light colors worked well on the smaller fish, on Thursday all our smaller ones came on pink or pink/white hootchies. Once the fish got a little finicky we put out Ballyhoo rigged with a trailing hook and caught some larger fish, to 7.5 pounds. Another method that worked for us was chumming with cut bait then drifting a strip back, using a 12” section of light wire leader to avoid getting cut off. Doing this also resulted in some non-targeted species being caught (Triggerfish). There were few Roosterfish found or seen but there were some Amberjack found in 180 to 200 feet of water and a few Snapper in the rocks along the beach.
    FISH RECIPE: Remember simple? It does not get simpler than this one. Take a skinless, boneless fillet of Dorado and trim it into two lengths, removing the bloodline in the center. Slice each piece into strips about 2 inches wide, on the diagonal. Dredge them in flour, then whipped egg whites, then panko crumbs and lower into hot oil. Let them cook for about4 minutes or less, then remove and let them drain on paper towels. You now have fish fingers, and they are great in tacos (especially hot out of the oil) and as snacks later on. Whip up some tarter sauce to go with them and away you go!
    NOTES: I hope everyone had a great Christmas, and be careful this coming New Years Eve! This weeks report was written to the music of “King Crimson” on the album “IN The Court of the Crimson King”, the 1969 Master Edition release. Until next week, Tight Lines!




    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  7. #381

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec. 9 - 15, 2013


    WEATHER: Occasionally sunny skies this past week brought a few mornings of what have been the coldest of the season to this point. I was getting reading in the low 60's, as low as 62 degrees on Thursday morning, as I went to the marina at 5:30 am. It warmed up later on of course and we ended up averaging 82 degrees during the mostly cloudy days early in the week and in the 85-86 degree range later in the week. We had a bit of wind blow in on Thursday as well, mostly affecting us in the afternoon, and continuing on into Friday and Saturday. I did not notice much of a breeze this morning. We did not get any real rain from these clouds, but it did spit a bit on us on Monday, just enough to spot up the windshields on the cars.

    WATER: The first few days of this week were a continuation of last weeks water as far as temperatures were concerned. On Monday the water on the Pacific side of the Cape was in the 78-79 degree range from the beach on out to the San Jaime and the Golden Gate Banks, to the west of there it dropped by four degrees very quickly. That was the only temperature break in our area. On Tuesday that started to change and by the end of the week our entire area was seeing water temperatures in the 77 degree range, from far west of those banks to up past the Gorda Banks area in the Sea of Cortez. The water color has been a bit off of “blue”, more of a blue with a green tinge to it, almost a glacial water look to it.

    BAIT: Caballito and a few Mackerel make up the choice of live baits this past week, and you were lucky to get the Mackerel. The price was the normal $3 each.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: Lots of Striped Marlin were being seen this week but not many of them wanted to bite. The Pacific side continued to be the best area to find these fish, and the usual bait holding areas were worked hard by the fleets. The ledge at the lighthouse and the canyon just on the north side, the ridge at Los Arcos, the drop at Migraino and the Golden Gate Bank all had fish, but few boats were getting bit, at least compared to how the action had been. In addition, we were seeing lots of small Striped Marlin, and I mean some of these fish were in the 40-50 pound class. When you did find a hungry fish it was aggressive and would readily bite on the lure or live bait, but these fish were few and far between. If you were fishing for Marlin this week your day consisted of throwing live bait at Marlin you saw on the surface, slow trolling live bait in one of the areas listed above or running out to one of the bait balls signaled by the swooping Frigate birds. The action was scattered up and down the Pacific coastline with little action seen on the Cortez side.

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Well, we are starting to see a very slow improvement in the catch of Yellowfin Tuna as more porpoise show in our area. The fish are still mostly footballs in the 6-10 pound class, but when you get into them they bite well. Its just hard to get real excited when your limit on these small fish is 5 per person, and if you fill that limit you are done keeping any fish for the rest of the day. Get into one of the pods of porpoise that hold Tuna and you never know what might bite though, there could be some much larger fish out on the edges, as a few lucky anglers found out this week, with Tuna to 80 pounds occasionally grabbing a passing lure, or gobbling a bait dropped in front of the traveling pods of porpoise. For the large Tuna, the Gorda Banks appeared to be the place to go as there was a short bite for a few days there. If you could work the area with chunks you stood a chance to catch fish that went as large as 260 pounds, but the success ration was not very high. Then again, these were very large fish!

    DORADO: There was little change in the Dorado action this past week from the week before. Lots of small 6 to 8 pound fish continued striking lures and trying to eat live bait on the Pacific side of the Cape. Most boats were shaking these fish off and waiting for larger ones to bite and since the limit is two per angler the small fish could fill a limit quickly. Getting a bigger Dorado this past week has been a matter of working harder and smarter. The larger fish continue to be found farther to the north, inside the Golden Gate area from the beach out to about two miles. Many boats that were slow trolling live bait, or drifting weighted live baits for Marlin were getting the larger Dorado. Working staggered depths with down-riggers and z-wings during a slow troll with live bait was effective, and you could be surprised at any time with either Marlin, Dorado, Tuna, Wahoo or if you were close to the beach, a large Snapper or Grouper.

    WAHOO: The bite was not what it has been, and the fish seemed to be a bit smaller, at least the ones that were caught. I heard a couple of anglers call them wee-hoos as they had caught a couple of them that were only 8-10 pounds. I expect the bite to be a bit better for these fish this coming week as we approach the full moon, but I have been wrong many times before. The Wahoo that were caught were found in the usual haunts, on top of the high spots and along the drop-offs, but there were also some caught out on the flats in 100 feet of water, so you just never know.

    INSHORE: The Roosterfish made themselves scarce this week, at least early in the day they were hard to find. The ones that were found were once again the smaller ones in the 5-6 pound class, there were not many larger 20-30 pound fish found. Boats that were going up to the Marguerite area and the Migraino area were doing well when they found schools of Sierra, and some of these fish were decent size for the species at 6-9 pounds, but there were also schools of small 2-5 pound fish. Either size of Sierra were capable of ruining any hootchie skirts used, and could make a swimming Rapallas look decades old after a few fish had been caught. Most of these fish were tight to the beach. There were also some true Red Snapper being found off the beach. Boats bottom bouncing strip baits in 60-120 feet of water were having decent luck on Snapper to 5 pounds with an occasional fish to 10 pounds.

    FISH RECIPE: I don't have a new recipe this week, but feel free to check out ones listed on my previous reports, they are all good. If I used one I found on the internet I give credit for it, and actually used the recipe, then listed it only if I would serve it again!

    NOTES: I guess this was the week for small fish. Small Marlin, Tuna, Dorado, Wahoo and Sierra. Add in that the bite was off just a bit and many boats were scratching hard to put clients on some decent fish this week. Of course there are always a few boats that are in the right place at the right time, that is what keeps us going as anglers, right? We will keep crossed fingers that the Mackerel will show up, because usually the big fish follow the bait! Seeing the number of small fish is also a good thing as this implies a good spawning season, and plenty of fish for the future! Come on down for the holidays, with plenty of whales to be seen and steady action on small fish and the chance to catch something big, it sure beats sitting in a freezing cold car waiting for it to warm up! This report was writing to the country music sounds of George Jones. Until next week, tight lines!




    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  8. #380

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec. 2 - 8, 2013



    WEATHER: Partly sunny skies once again, and while most of our friend and clients in the U.S. were shivering we were enjoying temperatures in the high 70's and low 80's during the daytime. We did our shivering at night after the sun had set and the breeze cooled us off. It seems my blood has thinned a bit as 72 degrees makes me get goose bumps and put on long sleeved shirts or a light jacket or sweater. Please don't make fun of those of us who walk around with a sweater on while you gambol about in your swimsuits! I know we look funny while walking the beach but at least there is no snow or ice on the ground!
    WATER: The Pacific side has had little change in water temperature this week, the water to the inside of the San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks is still warmer than elsewhere on the Pacific at a fairly consistent 78-79 degrees, down a degree or two from last week, but that's what happens in the winter here. Outside of the banks, to the west, the temperature has been in the 72-73 range, with this cooler water once again being a bit cleaner than the warmer inside water. Afternoon winds have had a fairly strong effect on the surface conditions as well with the swells in the mornings at 2-5 feet, but after the winds start (around noon every day) the wind chop picks up and we get a bit of cross swell of 1-2 feet from the wind that makes for interesting rides home. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water has been a consistent 78-79 degrees with a few spots peaking at 80 degrees. Surface conditions have been much better with swells staying in the 3 foot range and the wind chop not having much, if any effect once you get to the west and north of the 95 spot. The water on this side of the Cape has been a bit off-color, tending toward a clean green instead of a deep blue.
    BAIT: While Caballito remains the most common of the larger baits (which are selling for the normal $3 each) there are a few more Mackerel showing up in the bottoms of the bait boats. Still not very common yet, there should be more soon as the water continues to cool. Other than those two species, your choice is Green Jacks and small Pompano. I have not heard of any Sardines available locally, but there might have been some available up in San Jose.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: There was not much change this week from last weeks Billfish report. They still seem to be hanging out along the temperature break on the Pacific side, but there are small concentrations as well along the coast at the normal high spots such as right off the Lighthouse on the peanut shaped ledge and on the ridge running straight out from Los Arcos farther up the coast. There is a small bump to the inside/north of the Golden Gate that has also been producing a few fish, not to mention the small concentrations atop the Golden Gate Bank. I have heard from a few boats that made the run that there are some decent concentrations found this wee at the Finger Bank as well, but it has just been rumors, third hand information, so I have not been able to confirm it. The key to getting a Marlin (and they have all been Striped Marlin) has been to keep an eye on the sky and an eye on the depth finder. When you see the Frigate birds start to swoop, head there, as the fish are beginning to force a bait ball to the surface. If you see a bait ball on the depth sounder, stay there until the Marlin force it to the surface. Basicly, follow the bait, the fish will be where the food is. Sight fishing by spotting tail and fin tips and tossing a bit also worked well, and often produced double hook-ups. Seeing a “picket fence” with several fish in a row is beginning to become more common and offers a good chance at multiple hook-ups. The preferred bait has been Mackerel, but the fish will eat Caballito as well if they are hungry, the smaller baits seem to get eaten more often than the larger ones. Fish found just off the beach are suckers for the small Pompano, it seems to be a matter of “matching-the-hatch”, so to speak.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: I am still being patient, I have no choice. There are a few football to 25 pound fish around, but the chances of getting into them are small as the pods of porpoise they have been found with are scattered all over the place. I know of Pangas working the Dorado inside that have spotted small groups of porpoise and have hooked and landed several Yellowfin to 25 pounds, and cruiser going 30 miles off the beach doing the same thing. Some boats have reported finding pods of porpoise that cover acres of water but have not had any fish under them, while they find just a few porpoise that have given up four to six small Yellowfin. No rhyme or reason to it, just chance as far as I can tell.

    DORADO: Lots of small 6 to 8 pound fish have been striking lures and trying to eat live bait on the Pacific side of the Cape. The warmer, cleaner water has kept them around, trying the warm water on the Cortez side has not resulted in as many fish and the water is more green there as well. Getting a bigger Dorado this past week has been a matter of working harder and smarter. The plume of warm water running up the coast seems to taper to a point around Todo Santos, and boats going that far up have seen slightly larger fish. It may be a matter of the narrowing warm water concentrating the fish, but the fish caught toward the north have been consistently in the 12-15 pound class. Closer to home, in order to get the larger fish, you have had to make a slight change in tactics. Boats that were fishing using wire line or torpedo sinkers to get jet-head lures and swimming plugs down deep for Wahoo were hooking a few larger Dorado, some to 30 pounds, while boats pounding the surface were only getting the little guys. Having noticed this, quite a few boats began running down-riggers and Z-Wings with live bait to attract the larger Dorado. The only problem with this is that if there were Wahoo around, they would get the bait bitten in half or the leader cut without ever noticing it happen. Also, it is a great method for catching Striped Marlin as well and often one of these would gulp the bait. For anglers only wanting to fish for meat fish, this was not what they wanted. Well, I have always been happy to catch something rather than nothing, and would never turn my nose up at catching a Marlin!
    WAHOO: These fish are still here, and still biting, but you have to be in the right place, at the right time, using the right gear in order to have a decent shot at them. We just came off the new moon on the third, and have the full moon coming up around the 17th, so the bite should, repeat, should, be good then for these speedsters. The right place means along steep drop-offs, high spots on the bottom, ridges projecting out from shore and canyons running right up to the beach. The right time has been just before and just after tide change, when the water starts moving again. The right gear means lures with a short trace of wire leader to prevent cut-offs, lures or swimming plugs that will go deep, the deeper the better, and run at speed. If using live bait, make sure there is a trailing hook wired to the front hook as to prevent having the bait cut in half without hooking up, and running the bait deep.
    INSHORE: There were some decent sized Roosterfish reported this week, by decent I mean in the 18-25 pound class, but they were still out numbered by the little 5-6 pound fish. There were many more Sierra showing up as well with some of the fish coming in reaching the 8 pound mark on the scales, but most of them were 4-5 pounds. The Snapper bite dropped off, perhaps due to the new moon, but should improve once the full moon comes around. Once again, if you get into the stacks of Snapper that happen during the full moon, please limit your catch as these are spawning concentrations. I have not heard of any large Yellowtail this week but there have been fish to 10 pounds caught, and they are becoming more common every week. It should not be long before we start to see larger fish on a consistent basis.
    FISH RECIPE: Simple is the key work. This is about as simple as it gets. Take a Dorado fillet cut to meal size (or Snapper, or Wahoo), marinate it for about 30 minutes in fresh lemon juice. Dust it with salt and pepper, then again with some smoked Paprika (I have a big bottle of Penzy's in the cupboard) and cook it in a frying pan with a couple of tablespoons of oil (I like using the Avocado Oil they have here at Cost-Co). Serve it up with some potatoes that have been diced small and dusted with Thyme and a bit of Paprika as well as with a small salad. Easy, tasty and good for you!
    NOTES: I have forgotten to mention in my last two reports that the Whales are here! Grey Whales close to the beach and Humpback Whales farther out, both species have been putting on good shows for us on a daily basis. This weeks report was written to the music of “Two Tons Of Steel” on their CD “Not That Lucky”. A bit of Texas Rockabilly to keep my toes a tapping!
    P.S. I was reminded by several anglers and Captains this evening that I forgot to mention the presence of three Tuna Pens that were fished on Saturday and today. I didn’t forget them, I just had a momentary lapse of memory, it happens when you get older. Anyway, there have been three pens being towed from the west and toward the east. Two of them, the front two, appear to have fish in them, and most of the boats going to fish the pens have been working behind the front two. The last pen appears to to be empty. The bite at these pens has been enjoyed by the first few boats to arrive, plenty of Dorado, some Striped Marlin and a decent Wahoo bite. There have also been some football sized yellowfin tuna scattered around within 1/2 mile of the pens, enough to provide lots of action and limits on these small, 5 to 8 pound fish. The Dorado were decent size with the larger fish being caught by the first boats on the scene Saturday, smaller fish today. The same thing occurred with Wahoo as there were decent numbers in good sizes for the first boats on the scene. As the bite died off, boats that were willing to drop jigs and work behind the nets continued to catch fish. These Tuna Pens were 17 miles to the south of Cabo this morning, headed east, who knows where they will be tomorrow. Mince this report is about what has happened I needed to up date the report, but don’t expect this to be the case for the coming week. Thank you for the comments, and tight lines.



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  9. #379

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Nov. 26 – Dec. 1, 2013



    WEATHER: Once again we had a week with partly sunny skies. If I were a pessimist I would have said partly cloudy skies, but I am a fisherman and we fishermen have to be optimistic, that's just part of the sport. Anyway, partly sunny with our nighttime lows dipping into the mid 60's while the daytime highs have been just touching the 85 degree range on the thermometer on the patio. We ended last week with a spattering of rain as I finished the report but we have had none since then. It appears as if we have a chance of a bit of precipitation coming on Tuesday or Wednesday, but who knows, it could just as well be sunny and hot, but the animations (hurricane) for the eastern Pacific show some clouds working our way.
    WATER: Everyone I talked to this week said that the water wherever they went was almost glassy and calm the whole trip. I know that in the afternoons the water on the Pacific side received a bit of wind that caused some chop, but the swells stayed down and it was comfortable everywhere. As far as water temperatures go, the Sea of Cortez side of the Cape was a fairly steady 81 degrees within 5 miles of the beach and 82 degrees farther out than that. The big news is the temperature break on the Pacific side. If you ran a line just on the eastern edge of the San Jaime Banks and northward to just to the eastern edge of the Golden Gate Banks you would have been on the break, at least at the end of the week. Inside (eastern side) of the break the water was 80 degrees, outside of the line it was 76 degrees, and there was not much blending, it was a fairly sharply defined break. Not surprisingly for this time of year, the cooler water was cleaner, a bit more blue to it. This is the opposite of what we see when the water begins to warm back up in the late spring.
    BAIT: Caballito remain the most common of the larger baits, but there are still a few Mackerel showing up on the bait boats. As the water continues to cool we should start seeing many more of them, and fewer of the Caballito. There has also been a mix of misc. baits, a few Look-downs, a few green Jacks, a few small Pompano and of course this time of year some strips of Humboldt Squid. The live bait has been selling for the normal $3 per bait, there has been some frozen ballyhoo at the same price and the squid has been all over the place, depending on who you are buying it from.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Remember me mentioning how nice it was to not have to say, “You should have been here last week” last week? Well I had to say it this week, at least for the start of the week. The fishing for Striped Marlin went from red-hot to lukewarm almost overnight as soon as that had been written. It took until this Friday for the action to return, but it finally did. I have no idea why the bite dropped off, but boats that had been getting 5 to 6 releases per trip were suddenly only getting one, or sometimes none at all. During this time frame the temperature break slowly moved to the west, to where it is now, and it may have been the slow movement that threw everyone off. Now the fish are being found on the cool side of the break, or right on the edge of the warm water. Yesterday we had clients that hooked no Marlin on Thanksgiving release four and unfortunately tail wrap a fifth fish that died during the fight. Other boats were reporting the return of the bait-balls as well and once again the Frigate birds were pointing out the right locations to fish. This meant it was only an hour run to the break giving anglers plenty of time to find the Marlin concentrations.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: I keep telling myself “Self, be patient, the Yellowfin should show up anytime now”, but it is hard to be patient, I want my Sashimi now, dang it. Guess I will just have to continue waiting unless someone stumbles onto a pod of porpoise holding Tuna. It has been happening now and then this past week, and the Tuna have been footballs to 15 pounds, but they have been scarce for everyone. When a boat has found the Tuna they have been quiet about it until they have caught a few, then finally they will announce it on the radio. Everyone within 8 miles then piles on the school and puts them down. My fingers remain crossed that these fish will return soon, and in force.

    DORADO: The action on Dorado went had in hand with the action on Striped Marlin this week. As soon as the week started the action dropped to a standstill, but thankfully the bite returned at the end of the week. While the Marlin action moved offshore with the temperature break, the Dorado stayed in the warmer water near the beach. Most boats were finding them from 100 feet to two miles out. I hate to keep repeating myself, but the best way to catch them continues to be trolling lures until one is hooked up, then leaving that first fish out and dropping a live bait back about 50 feet behind it in order to catch others that may be with it. Second most productive (and what happens quite often when the fish are playing hard to get) is boating the first fish so there is something for dinner, then working the area with slow trolled live bait. Where there is one, there is usually another, especially on the larger of the species. Dorado, once they get to about 18 pound or so, seem to start spreading out and you will only find two or three packed together, and the really large fish in the 40+ range will be loners.
    WAHOO: At the end of the week the Wahoo action picked up for boats working the shallow waters close to the beach. This may be due to the moon once again approaching the new phase, which will be on Dec. 1st. Once again many anglers and crew were surprised to pull in a live bait only to find it had been bitten cleanly in half, or find a lure that had the skirts chopped off. Crews that decided to forgo fishing for Dorado and concentrate on Wahoo changed to wire leaders and either fished their lures on wire lines as well, or placed heavy 24 ounce torpedo sinkers ahead of the lures, running the main line to a swivel, attaching the sinker then attaching the lure to the sinkers other end with another swivel. Working the shallows at 8 to 10 knots with this setup caught a lot of the Wahoo brought in at the end of this week. These fish were not giants, with the larger of them reaching 45 pounds, but the average was a decent 25 pounds.
    INSHORE: The little Roosterfish we have been catching continue to bite small lures just off the beach, and there is a decent chance of running into a school of larger fish in the 15-18 pound class while fishing just outside the breakers with live bait. As long as the water on the beach remains fairly warm this bite should continue. While we are still seeing small Sierra and small Yellowtail, they have not been plentiful. Once the water temperature starts to drop we should see an increase in numbers on these fish. I am hoping that the snapper bite will turn on in a couple of weeks when we have the full moon once again, often this time of year the snapper start to school on the high spots in spawning congregations. When this happens the action can really turn on, but please, if you manage to be there at the right time, try to limit your catch, not catch your limit. These are spawning aggregations after all, and we do want fish in the coming years!
    FISH RECIPE: Can you say “smoked”? As easy as pie (easier, actually as there is no cooking involved), making a sandwich using smoked tuna or dorado flaked into some mayo (I like using wasabi mayo, check last weeks recipe for that) with some diced celery and onion is magnificent. Use croissants instead of regular bread for a meal you would be willing to pay big bucks for.
    NOTES: I hope your thanksgiving was as great as ours was, if you live where it is celebrated. We had a lot to be thankful for this year, and friends to share with at the house. Now, if those darn Tuna would just show up I could have Sashimi for Christmas, Ho-Ho-Ho! This weeks report was written to the music of Mark Knopfler on his second solo release, the 2002 “Sailing To America”. I hope you like it! Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  10. #378

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Nov. 18 - 24, 2013


    WEATHER: We have been under partly cloudy skies for most of the week and it has been rather nice! I know that everyone loves the sun, and while you can still get a tan while it's cloudy, it's just not the same. However, from a fisherman's point of view, these partly cloudy skies help in several ways. Number one is less glare on the water, making it easier to see and find fish indicators such as bird piles, fin tips and tails and porpoise in the distance. Second is that without the direct sun, it is more comfortable on the water! Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80's while nighttime lows have been in the mid to low 70's, and, it's been much less humid than it was last week!
    WATER: With no storms in the area the swells died back down to what we expect this time of year, 3-5 feet on the Pacific side of the Cape and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side. At least in our area that is. If you travel far enough up the Cortez you eventually end up on the East Cape, and there the wind has kicked things up so that a bumpy ride is almost a guarantee. Locally the water temperatures have remained steady with water from the Arch on the Pacific side to Los Frailes being 81-82 degrees, and outside of 10 miles by Los Frailes being several degrees warmer. We have had a cool spot of water hovering right on top of the 95 spot all week long, it has been 76 degrees and slightly off color. On the Pacific side the water has been blue and 76 degrees with slightly warmer 78 degree water to the west side of the San Jaime Banks.
    BAIT: Caballito, Tortilla Chips (baby Pompano), a few Mackerel and assorted other small fish have been the larger live baits available at the usual $3 per bait.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Billfish action remained red hot this past week and you did not have to go far to get to the action as many boats fishing only half days, or anglers fishing on Pangas were able to find decent sized Striped Marlin close to home. With water temperatures at a perfect 76 degrees and blue, the area from the lighthouse to inside the Golden Gate Bank on the Pacific side of the Cape was a perfect area to focus efforts. At times I did hear complaints from anglers looking for meat fish that the Striped Marlin were getting in the way! Schools of baby Pompano, small Mackerel and Caballito close to the beach meant that the Striped Marlin were close as well. With the usual combat fishing we see this time of year, when every boat in the area races to be the first one on the scene, when the high flying Frigates suddenly appear, swooping down on escaping bait, it was exciting, although a bit nerve wracking. Fortunately the fish were thick enough that you did not need to compete in the “speed boat challenge”. Hanging around an area that everyone had just left was a perfect way to make sure you caught a fish with less competition. Slow trolling or drifting through an area everyone had just left gave you a great shot at fish, as the noise and commotion caused by so many boats in one spot drove the fish and the bait under surface. They came back up in a little while, so if you stuck it out you hooked up. The closer to the beach you were, the more likely you were to catch something on the little Pompanos, slightly farther off the beach the Caballito worked and if you were several miles out then Mackerel were the bait of choice. Fish were thick enough off of Los Arcos ridge, Golden Gate Bank and the lighthouse ledge that dropping live bait to 100 feet or more on the drift was a very productive technique. Please remember though, if you are using live bait and drifting like this, ask the crews to use circle hooks. This is less stressful on the Marlin and makes a safe release much easier. Also, please don't remove the fish from the water for a picture before releasing it, the internal organs are normally supported by the bouyancy of the water, and the weight when removed can tear the connective tissue holding them in place. Many charters stress catch and release for Billfish. We do as well, but with the understanding that there will be a few fatalities to the fish, and if fishing in a big money tournament we may take one or two. I just hate to see pictures of people holding a Marlin out of the water, then bragging that they “release” all the fish their anglers catch. Maybe, but what condition are those fish in?
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Tuna are definitely the low spot of our present fishery, at least for the past week. A few fish are being caught at the high spots on the Gordo Banks, but you may end up putting in days of effort to get one, but its a pretty sure thing you will be feeding the sea lions. Farther up the line off of Punta Gorda there has been an occasional flurry of football sized Yellowfin on the high spots, but nothing I have heard of indicates consistent action. Even boats that have been traveling 40+ miles offshore have been having a bit of trouble finding Porpoise pods that have held fish. Those that have been able to fish pods that hold Yellowfin have done fairly decent using live bait dropped in front of the traveling schools and flying a kite over the advancing front of these pods of Porpoise. The usual lures pulled while trolling have not been nearly as successful, but when they have worked, they have been dark colored lures for the most part, dark purple or green hootchies, or medium sized 5” lures in dark colors. For some reason cedar plugs have not been very hot for the past week.













    DORADO: I believe you could make a good case for either Striped Marlin or Dorado as being our “Fish of the Week” this past week, as they both have been found in the same areas and both of them have provided plenty of action. This week the Dorado action picked back up, with any angler that wanted to catch a limit finding it no problem at all, the only difficulty was holding off on the 10-12 pound fish until one of the 20 pound plus fish hooked up. Normally we would be working the Frigate birds for Dorado, but with the Striped Marlin being as thick as they have been the Frigates have been on them instead. The best way to ensure a good catch on Dorado was to troll a 5” to 7” lure at slightly higher speeds, often 10 knots or better, until hooking up a Dorado, then working the same are with slow trolled live bait. The only problem (and what a problem to have!) were the number of Striped Marlin that would come in and eat bait intended for Dorado. Many of the boats were working the area between the Arch and the desalinization plant on the Pacific side, and going no further than that to get limits on decent Dorado (legal limit is two Dorado per person).
    WAHOO: There was no change in the Wahoo report for this week, it is a repeat of last weeks action as the occasional Wahoo continued to surprise anglers, and crews as well, as these toothy fish managed to snip many lures from leaders without anyone noticing! Boats that were using wire leader, or just happened to get hooked right, were bringing back fish averaging 30 pounds. There were not a lot of them, but enough to make each strike a possibility.
    INSHORE: Small Roosterfish still dominate the beach fishery but there have been occasional schools of fish in the 15-18 pound class show up, to the enjoyment of the anglers! Combine these Roosterfish with some decent Red Snapper action in the rocks and if you did not want Marlin or Dorado you had options. Or maybe you were just tired of catching Striped Marlin and Dorado and wanted something different. While I do not recommend it for cruisers, Pangas were able to get right in tight to the rocks in order to sling out a small weight with live bait into the pockets among the rocks. There were many snags and break-offs, but there were also some very nice Snapper to be found as well. A few Sierra and a few Yellowtail continue to be caught, the numbers go up just a bit every week, and the size on both seems to be improving slightly.
    FISH RECIPE: Seared Tuna with Sesame seeds: Just about as simple as you can make it (my favorite kind!) Recipe posted on the blog in a few minutes.
    NOTES: Can you say “Red Hot”? I normally avoid using those words, but since I am not predicting, just reporting, I feel they are appropriate for this past weeks fishing action. Add in the unusual number of whales that are showing up early and it has been great to be on the water! We are approaching Thanksgiving, and we have many things to be thankful for this year. We hope to have 20-30 people over for dinner Thursday once again, and one of the things to be thankful for is the number of friends that we do have. It is time like these months past that you really come to appreciate who they are, and what they do for you. On that note I would like to wish all our U.S. Friends “Happy Thanksgiving”, and offer thanks to all our Canadian and Mexican friends for their continued support this year. This weeks report is written to the music of Roger Creagor on a mixed CD given to me by a good friend. Until next week, Tight Lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

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