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  1. #378
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Nov. 18 - 24, 2013


    WEATHER: We have been under partly cloudy skies for most of the week and it has been rather nice! I know that everyone loves the sun, and while you can still get a tan while it's cloudy, it's just not the same. However, from a fisherman's point of view, these partly cloudy skies help in several ways. Number one is less glare on the water, making it easier to see and find fish indicators such as bird piles, fin tips and tails and porpoise in the distance. Second is that without the direct sun, it is more comfortable on the water! Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80's while nighttime lows have been in the mid to low 70's, and, it's been much less humid than it was last week!
    WATER: With no storms in the area the swells died back down to what we expect this time of year, 3-5 feet on the Pacific side of the Cape and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side. At least in our area that is. If you travel far enough up the Cortez you eventually end up on the East Cape, and there the wind has kicked things up so that a bumpy ride is almost a guarantee. Locally the water temperatures have remained steady with water from the Arch on the Pacific side to Los Frailes being 81-82 degrees, and outside of 10 miles by Los Frailes being several degrees warmer. We have had a cool spot of water hovering right on top of the 95 spot all week long, it has been 76 degrees and slightly off color. On the Pacific side the water has been blue and 76 degrees with slightly warmer 78 degree water to the west side of the San Jaime Banks.
    BAIT: Caballito, Tortilla Chips (baby Pompano), a few Mackerel and assorted other small fish have been the larger live baits available at the usual $3 per bait.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Billfish action remained red hot this past week and you did not have to go far to get to the action as many boats fishing only half days, or anglers fishing on Pangas were able to find decent sized Striped Marlin close to home. With water temperatures at a perfect 76 degrees and blue, the area from the lighthouse to inside the Golden Gate Bank on the Pacific side of the Cape was a perfect area to focus efforts. At times I did hear complaints from anglers looking for meat fish that the Striped Marlin were getting in the way! Schools of baby Pompano, small Mackerel and Caballito close to the beach meant that the Striped Marlin were close as well. With the usual combat fishing we see this time of year, when every boat in the area races to be the first one on the scene, when the high flying Frigates suddenly appear, swooping down on escaping bait, it was exciting, although a bit nerve wracking. Fortunately the fish were thick enough that you did not need to compete in the “speed boat challenge”. Hanging around an area that everyone had just left was a perfect way to make sure you caught a fish with less competition. Slow trolling or drifting through an area everyone had just left gave you a great shot at fish, as the noise and commotion caused by so many boats in one spot drove the fish and the bait under surface. They came back up in a little while, so if you stuck it out you hooked up. The closer to the beach you were, the more likely you were to catch something on the little Pompanos, slightly farther off the beach the Caballito worked and if you were several miles out then Mackerel were the bait of choice. Fish were thick enough off of Los Arcos ridge, Golden Gate Bank and the lighthouse ledge that dropping live bait to 100 feet or more on the drift was a very productive technique. Please remember though, if you are using live bait and drifting like this, ask the crews to use circle hooks. This is less stressful on the Marlin and makes a safe release much easier. Also, please don't remove the fish from the water for a picture before releasing it, the internal organs are normally supported by the bouyancy of the water, and the weight when removed can tear the connective tissue holding them in place. Many charters stress catch and release for Billfish. We do as well, but with the understanding that there will be a few fatalities to the fish, and if fishing in a big money tournament we may take one or two. I just hate to see pictures of people holding a Marlin out of the water, then bragging that they “release” all the fish their anglers catch. Maybe, but what condition are those fish in?
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Tuna are definitely the low spot of our present fishery, at least for the past week. A few fish are being caught at the high spots on the Gordo Banks, but you may end up putting in days of effort to get one, but its a pretty sure thing you will be feeding the sea lions. Farther up the line off of Punta Gorda there has been an occasional flurry of football sized Yellowfin on the high spots, but nothing I have heard of indicates consistent action. Even boats that have been traveling 40+ miles offshore have been having a bit of trouble finding Porpoise pods that have held fish. Those that have been able to fish pods that hold Yellowfin have done fairly decent using live bait dropped in front of the traveling schools and flying a kite over the advancing front of these pods of Porpoise. The usual lures pulled while trolling have not been nearly as successful, but when they have worked, they have been dark colored lures for the most part, dark purple or green hootchies, or medium sized 5” lures in dark colors. For some reason cedar plugs have not been very hot for the past week.













    DORADO: I believe you could make a good case for either Striped Marlin or Dorado as being our “Fish of the Week” this past week, as they both have been found in the same areas and both of them have provided plenty of action. This week the Dorado action picked back up, with any angler that wanted to catch a limit finding it no problem at all, the only difficulty was holding off on the 10-12 pound fish until one of the 20 pound plus fish hooked up. Normally we would be working the Frigate birds for Dorado, but with the Striped Marlin being as thick as they have been the Frigates have been on them instead. The best way to ensure a good catch on Dorado was to troll a 5” to 7” lure at slightly higher speeds, often 10 knots or better, until hooking up a Dorado, then working the same are with slow trolled live bait. The only problem (and what a problem to have!) were the number of Striped Marlin that would come in and eat bait intended for Dorado. Many of the boats were working the area between the Arch and the desalinization plant on the Pacific side, and going no further than that to get limits on decent Dorado (legal limit is two Dorado per person).
    WAHOO: There was no change in the Wahoo report for this week, it is a repeat of last weeks action as the occasional Wahoo continued to surprise anglers, and crews as well, as these toothy fish managed to snip many lures from leaders without anyone noticing! Boats that were using wire leader, or just happened to get hooked right, were bringing back fish averaging 30 pounds. There were not a lot of them, but enough to make each strike a possibility.
    INSHORE: Small Roosterfish still dominate the beach fishery but there have been occasional schools of fish in the 15-18 pound class show up, to the enjoyment of the anglers! Combine these Roosterfish with some decent Red Snapper action in the rocks and if you did not want Marlin or Dorado you had options. Or maybe you were just tired of catching Striped Marlin and Dorado and wanted something different. While I do not recommend it for cruisers, Pangas were able to get right in tight to the rocks in order to sling out a small weight with live bait into the pockets among the rocks. There were many snags and break-offs, but there were also some very nice Snapper to be found as well. A few Sierra and a few Yellowtail continue to be caught, the numbers go up just a bit every week, and the size on both seems to be improving slightly.
    FISH RECIPE: Seared Tuna with Sesame seeds: Just about as simple as you can make it (my favorite kind!) Recipe posted on the blog in a few minutes.
    NOTES: Can you say “Red Hot”? I normally avoid using those words, but since I am not predicting, just reporting, I feel they are appropriate for this past weeks fishing action. Add in the unusual number of whales that are showing up early and it has been great to be on the water! We are approaching Thanksgiving, and we have many things to be thankful for this year. We hope to have 20-30 people over for dinner Thursday once again, and one of the things to be thankful for is the number of friends that we do have. It is time like these months past that you really come to appreciate who they are, and what they do for you. On that note I would like to wish all our U.S. Friends “Happy Thanksgiving”, and offer thanks to all our Canadian and Mexican friends for their continued support this year. This weeks report is written to the music of Roger Creagor on a mixed CD given to me by a good friend. Until next week, Tight Lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  2. #377
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Fish Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    October 21 – Nov. 3, 2013
    It seems I have to apologize again as it has been two weeks instead of one since my last report. In my defense, I left the morning after the Bisbee Black and Blue Tournament for Ensenada to bring a boat with the owner and friends down to Cabo and had little time to write. So, you get this report instead. We had people fishing this past week so I will use their information as well as what I have been told by other anglers and Captains as the basis for the information on this past weeks fishing, and my own time on the water during tournament week for that time frame. I may mention at times as well the experiences we had on the trip down.
    WEATHER: I truly don't think the weather could have been much better during the Bisbee tournament week. We had mostly clear skies, evening lows in the low to mid 70's and daytime highs in the mid 80's. The winds we experienced were light and variable on the Cortez side of the Cape and light at 4-10 knots on the Pacific side. Add in the small swells and it was really nice. This most recent week showed a bit of a change as a deck of clouds moved in as Hurricane Raymond passed well to the south and west of us, leaving trailing remnants to bring a bit of humidity back in our lives. Daytime highs reached the low 90's while nighttime lows were in the mid to high 70's and it was humid, a bit more like summertime. The cloud cover broke at the end of the week and it again became nice and sunny. We won't be seeing a lot of that this week though, at least at the beginning, as Tropical Storm Sonia begins her approach to the mainland. She is expected to pass to the south of us this evening and tonight and has a very large deck of clouds, some of them with plenty of rain. At this time she is 250 miles to the south and expected to pass within 150 miles as she turns to the east and makes landfall on the mainland. During our trip down from Ensenada we had wonderful weather with the exception on Wednesday. Early in the morning as we were at anchor in Magdalena Bay the wind picked up to around 25knots as had been expected and we spend all day watching movies and eating. Thursday we went out again and had fairly smooth going until approaching Lusitania Banks in the evening and the winds picked up again, knocking us around a bit until we came to the lee of the Peninsula around midnight. Friday morning as we set lines at first light on Golden Gate Banks it was glassy and remained that way until arriving at Puerto Los Cabos in the late afternoon.
    WATER: The seas never did build up from any of the storms that passed us, at least it did not develop any short, close together sets that make for uncomfortable rides. The item of most importance in anglers mind, at least for the first week was the water temperature and the clarity. Both these can be very important in a tournament, so everyone was watching changes closely. For the tournament we were seeing the water on the Cortez side of the cape being in the 84-85 degree range, with a bit of mixing and off-color to it. Directly south of us, and running basicly in an east-west direction along the 1,000 fathom line was a slightly cleaner demarcation, with the water a degree cooler and cleaner to the south. Once reaching the San Jaime Banks this line ran more toward the northwest. Inside along shore on the Pacific side, as well as on the Cortez side along the Punta Gorda area the water was more off-colored with a heavier tinge of green. This week the average water temperature dropped at least two degrees on the Pacific side as we were reading water between 80.5 and 82.7 degrees on Friday, and the water was a very clean blue. Throughout the past two weeks surface conditions were fine, with only some surface chop the middle of the second week as remnants of Raymond moved past.
    BAIT: Caballito, and frozen Ballyhoo could be had for $3 each this week, and there were actually a few mackerel to be had as well. Sardines were just a bit easier to find, but still not readily available.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Once again telling the results of the Bisbee Black and Blue Marlin Tournament may be one of the best ways of showing accurate catch statistics, at least for the Black and Blue Marlin. Striped Marlin did not count in this tournament, so most of these hooked up were not reported in on the radio if it was immediately obvious what the fish was. Based on our personal experience, I would hazard a guess that there were about twice the numbers of Striped Marlin hooked up as there were Blues or Blacks. The first day of the Tournament there were no qualifying fish brought to the scale (#300 or larger to qualify), there were 12 Blue Marlin caught with a #290 brought to the scales, the rest released, and one Black Marlin released. On day two things improved a bit as 21 Blue Marlin were caught with two brought to the scales, one of them underweight but the boat “Retriever” with owner/angler Martha Macnab weighing a 525 pound Blue Marlin, and one Black Marlin released. The catch improved yet again on day three with 25 Blue Marlin caught with nine brought to the scales and one Black Marlin released.. Four of these were qualifiers, the largest of the tournament was caught this day and with angler Linda Williams in the chair and Captain Kevin Pahl on the helm, “Team II Success” captured the largest fish of the tournament with a 774 pound Blue Marlin. The top release team was a 56' Beneteue Sailboat, the “Titan” with three releases. One very interesting thing about this tournament, if you care to look, is the fact that the top two fish were caught by female anglers, and the fishing cockpit of the top release team was run by a female angler! With a total of 61 Blues and Blacks caught there had to be well over 150 Striped Marlin as well. On a side note, the last day of our delivery we put lines in on the Golden Gate Bank at first gray light and less than five minutes later hooked up, fought and then released a Blue Marlin we estimated at 250 pounds. Later in the day we were south of the San Jaime Bank along the 1,000 fathom line and managed to catch two more, one estimated at 300 pounds and the other at 250 pounds, lost a large fish after a giant first run estimated at 500 pounds and missed another Blue Marlin Bite. The fish are still out there, at least the Blue Marlin offshore, and I heard on the radio that there were plenty of Striped Marlin to be found just off the beach on the Pacific side. We spotted several areas with Frigate birds working small bait balls offshore, and there were Striped Marlin working on these. Up outside of Magdalena Bay boats were working Frigate birds and releasing double digit numbers every day.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Yellowfin Tuna have been the disappointment of the past two weeks. There have been a few large fish found, but not in any numbers and there has been no real concentration of fish in any one area. There have been quite a few football fish in the 10-15 pound class found under porpoise, but again, these have been scattered and moving around a lot, so it has been difficult for the boats to pinpoint them on a daily basis. This does not bode real well for the upcoming Western Outdoor News Tuna Shootout (fishing November 7 and 8, entry fee $800) unless there is a drastic change. Of course there will be large fish brought in, but probably not in the numbers we have seen in the past. Maybe the passing of Tropical Storm Sonia will bring about a change? Lets keep our fingers crossed!
    DORADO: Sometimes you just cannot appreciate what you have until it is gone. The fishing for Dorado continued to be great for the past two weeks with plenty of fish to be found along the Pacific coastline between the lighthouse and the Gaspirino area up around Todo Santos. The majority of the fish were between the beach and three miles offshore, with most of them found within two miles of the beach. We really missed the action on the fish on the trip down from Ensenada, as they can provide steady excitement when they are biting. Most of the boats that focused on the Dorado (and that was the majority of the charters these past two weeks) were able to post limits of two fish per angler, then go search for other species.
    WAHOO: Sparse, but there, were the reports I received from both anglers and Captains upon my return Saturday. It seems that there have been Wahoo caught every day, but no large numbers in any one area, more of a lucky thing than anything else. Well, with the exception of a couple of private boats that focus on these fish and were able to get daily action up in the Gorda Banks, Punta Gorda area.
    INSHORE: Things inshore are changing to wintertime mode, but slowly, as we are starting to see a few more Sierra and small Yellowtail every week. With the Dorado action being so good just off the beach, there has not been much in the way of effort next to the beach so it is hard to tell exactly what is there, but reports from a few of the Panga captains I know show that there are still small Roosterfish (less than 5 pounds) and a scattering of Amberjack and Snapper.
    FISH RECIPE: You can mix and match spices and additional herbs to your hearts content, but it is hard to beat a simple grilled fish meal. The fish is showcased when you keep it simple, and when the fish is as fresh as we get it here it is just about the only way to go. There does come a time though when you are dealing with fish that has been frozen. You have returned home and that Tuna, Dorado or Wahoo you caught on your fishing trip needs to be used, it just stares up at you from the freezer, saying “eat me, choose me for dinner”. This is when those slightly more complicated recipes come in handy. I have to say in the attempt at full disclosure that very few of the recipes I post here are my own, except for the simple ones. I try to give credit where it is due, and the following is the direct result of reading a cookbook by Sam Choy and has become one of my favorites. My cholesterol level goes up just from reading it, but here goes,
    Take four 8 oz Wahoo or Dorado fillets and slice a pocket in the side of each one, almost all the way through. Mix some softened butter with minced fresh parsley to form four butter logs the size of your finger and put them in the freezer. One of these will go in each of the pockets you just cut in the fillets. Mince 8 oz of Macadamia nuts, mince them very finely, they are going to crust the fillets. Dredge the fillets (after placing the butter logs inside) through flour, then whipped eggs, then through the minced Macadamia nuts and lightly brown both sides in a skillet or pan set at medium high. Have the oven pre-heated to 350 degrees and once the fillets are browned, place them in a glass pan that has been rubbed with butter and place them in the oven for about 15 minutes. For a sauce, take two Mangos and dice one of them fine, place the other in a blender (after removing the seed and skin of course) along with an ounce or two of fresh parsley and chop/blend/pulse the mix with a bit of white vinegar and some sugar (both to taste). Heat this mix until it has simmered several minutes than add the diced Mango. Pour equal amounts on each of four plates, place the cooked fish fillets on the sauce and a healthy scoop of rice on the side and you are done!
    NOTES: As I was writing this report we received our first rain from Tropical Storm Sonia. Not a lot, but a promise of things to come. There is still no wind and we don't really expect to get any until this evening. As you can tell, I got a bit wordy on this report, having a lot to say about the fishing and my trip, just be glad I am not writing on other things, I might have bleeding fingertips by the time I was done! Our trip down the coast was great, with some wonderful people on board the 51' Rivera “High Bid”. A new boat for the owner, but one I have delivered before under a different boat name, it has been updated and upgraded to perfection. We had no issues mechanically and had firsts for the new name with first Dorado, first Striped Marlin, first Blue Marlin, first Wahoo, first Spotted Bay Bass (a Mag Bay specialty). My thanks and appreciation to new owners Carl and Sally, and guests Rick, Dave, Leo and Frank. Most of all to my deckhand Carlos who somehow was able to make everyone happy while living in tight quarters. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  3. #376
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    January 7 - 13, 2013
    WEATHER: It feels as if we are getting into our winter season as the morning lows have been in the high 50's and the daytime highs in the high 70's. I don't think I saw the temperature raise to 80 degrees this week. This is great if you have been dealing with below freezing weather at home, but cold for us who live here. We did have some wind from the north again this week and it kept things cool, combine that with cloud cover for about half the week and it feels like the season has changed.

    WATER: At the end of this week there was not much change from the end of last week as far as the surface temperatures went. The cold green water we had seen to east of a line across the Gordo Banks and the area south had moved to the east, allowing cleaner, slightly warmer water on the Gordo Bank and across the flats just to the east of Punta Gorda. To the west of that area the water inshore of the 1,000 fathom line remained in the 72 degree range, and south of the 1,000 fathom line it warmed to 75 degrees. On the Pacific and across the Cape region to the south the water averaged 74 degrees. Due to the northerly wind the water on the Pacific side and offshore on the Sea of Cortez side remained a bit choppy and had a lump of 2-5 foot swells, spaced far enough apart that it was not strongly felt. On the Cortez side the swells were smaller, as is usual, at 1-3 feet.

    BAIT: Caballito, Mackerel and frozen Ballyhoo could be had for $3 each this week, and there were very few Sardinas available.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: The Striped Marlin bite slowed down just a bit this week, perhaps due to the new moon phase, there has to be some reason. Instead of almost every boat getting one or two, sometimes four releases, we were lucky to get that many hook-ups, and get a release for the day. The fish are still there, we are seeing them tailing on the surface, they just were showing little interest in bait or lures this week. This is sure to change as the moon phase changes, it always does. The good point is that the fish are still here! Most of the fish were found on the Pacific side from the Golden Gate to the San Jaime and inside that line, in the canyon. Not as many this week were found inside the two mile line, more were found just outside there. Not to say there were no fish caught, contrary, there were plenty of fish caught and released, and unfortunately quite a few brought in to the dock, just not as many as were caught last week. My guess is that approximately 60% of the boats caught a billfish this week.

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: The tuna pen that came though our area last week is gone, but the word is that there are several more that will be approaching soon. Hopefully they will be holding as many fish as the one that just passed. Meanwhile, there have been Yellowfin found outside and to the south of the San Jaime Bank, it was just a bit of a bumpy trip to get to them. The porpoise were holding Tuna so the trick was to find the porpoise and hope you were there at the right time. The tuna were footballs for the most part, but one of the schools was of fish between 25 and 45 pounds, and I did hear of an 80 pound class fish caught as well. The larger fish were biting on live bait drifted way back behind the boat, and the usual dark colored lures and cedar plugs accounted for the rest.

    DORADO: As the water continues to cool the bite continues to slow, but there are enough Dorado around to still be the offshore fish of the week. Not as many anglers limited out this week as did last week, but the fish were still in the same areas and feeding the same. The week before last the fish count on Dorado really spiked due to the tuna pen coming by, this past week we returned to more normal conditions. I know I heard a charter broker telling potential clients that the Dorado fishing was off-the-chart good several days after the tuna pen was gone, hope they were not too disappointed! Meanwhile, fishing within two miles of the beach on the Pacific side resulted in the majority of the Dorado found, and these cool water fish were a bit larger, and keep getting larger, every week. My guess is that the average this week was 15 pounds, and there were probably about a quarter of the boats getting limits and the rest about one fish per angler, that was for the boats that were targeting the Dorado. As normal, keeping the first fish in the water to attract more worked well, as did slow trolling a live bait under feeding Frigate birds.

    WAHOO: New moon but cool water, what more need I say? Wahoo really prefer slightly warmer water than we are experiencing right now, but there were still a few caught this past week locally. Most of the fish were small, in the 10-15 pound range, and there were not many of them, but you still had a chance. This just might have been the last week to get one of these speedsters hooked up until the water warms back up. The fish that were caught were found inside the 300 foot depth contour, and were caught by boats that targeted them using Rapallas and Marauders on wire leader. There were more fish cut off on mono-filament leader used on lures run for Dorado than were caught.

    INSHORE: As I said on my mid-week up-date, the Sierra bite went wide open during the middle of the week with boats getting into the fish from the lighthouse all the way up the Pacific coast to Migraino. Bright colored hootchies worked great, and I had a client who fly-fished for two days with a guide who got tired of catching them after a fish count that went over 50! They went through many flies during the two days, starting with fully dressed ones and finally putting on new ones when all that was left was just a bit of dressing on the hook. Tired arms, a fish on every cast and the fish ranged from 3 pounds to 8 pounds, it doesn't get any better than that! As well as the Sierra, there have been some Amberjack, Grouper and a few Snapper being found. As far as Yellowtail are concerned, the commercial panga anglers working at night are getting a few, but there have been no real numbers found during the daytime. We are still seeing a few scattered small Roosterfish as well.

    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!

    NOTES: There are plenty of whales to be seen when the fishing slows down so even if you are not a hard-core angler you deserve to get out on the water for that show. And of course since there are fish biting, catch dinner as well! Oh, and I was surprised this morning when I went to the dock to buy licenses for my clients that the dock price had gone up to 180 pesos per person for a one day license, or $15 US if you were paying with dollars. I thought I'd mention something about myself today. I am actually a Captain and don't just call myself a Captain, or Commander, or Admiral. I hold a 100 Ton U.S.C.G. License and am I.G.F.A. Certified, and am a Captain on a private boat. I have 10 ½ years in the U.S. Navy, 6 years experience commercial fishing in the tropics and extensive experience in wholesale/retail seafood. My Charter experience started after commercial fishing became hard on my body and I have been working charter and private boats for 18 years, and have been in Cabo, working on boats and chartering boats for 13 years. We have a business license, pay taxes and work out of the house since shop space is so expensive here. My reports have been going out every week (with a few weeks missed due to hurricanes) for 12 years, un-biased and honest, I don't try to lay it on thick in order to get you here, just try to give you information to help you make fishing decisions. I appreciate all the e-mails I get from you as readers and plan on continuing the reports as long as possible! This weeks report was written to the music of James Taylor and his “Best of” CD. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  4. #375
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com


    Cabo Fish Report

    Dec 31, 2012 – January 6, 2013
    WEATHER: After I had posted the report last week, on Sunday, we had some rain come down, actually it was more like a little bit of Seattle sunshine (those of you from there know what I mean). After that it started to clear up and from early in the week until now we have had clear skies and great temperatures. The daytime highs have been in the high 70's to low 80's while the nighttime lows have been in the low 60's.

    WATER: Let's see, if you draw a line from just to the east of the Gordo Banks southward to just to the east of the 1150 then everything to the east of that line was in the 71-72 degrees range and green. To the west of there the water warmed up a bit. In a east-west line from 5 miles off of Cabo San Lucas everything to the north appeared to be in the 74 degree range while everything to the south of it appeared to be in the 76 degree range. It was also much cleaner water west of the 1250 and the Gordo Banks. Northerly winds made the afternoons bumpy out there but most of the mornings were just fine with swells on the Pacific side at the usual 2-5 feet and on the Cortez side at 1-3 feet.

    BAIT: Caballito, Mackerel and frozen Ballyhoo could be had for $3 each this week, and there were very few Sardinas available.

    FISHING:

    BILLFISH: I never did get any confirmation of Black Marlin being caught last week off of San Jose, so who knows? The Striped Marlin action however has been great on the Pacific side and just out in front of Cabo. Our clients have been catching several every trip and hooking up many more, with 98% of the fish released. Perhaps we were just lucky but out Marlin catch ratio this week was 100%, every boat that went out caught at least one Marlin, and for many of the anglers this was their first attempt at saltwater sportfishing. Now that they are hooked, I hope they don't expect action like this every trip! Most of the fish were caught on live bait dropped back to fish appearing in the pattern (45%), some were caught by tossing a live bait in front of them as they were tailing on the surface (30%) and the rest were caught on trolled lures (25%). The action occurred close to home for most of the boats as there were decent concentrations of fish from the Arch to up the coast on the Pacific side as far as Migraino Beach, out to 5 miles. There were other fish scattered out across the area with small concentrations found on all the banks as well as the current lines.

    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Tuna were an on-off fish for most of this week. We had one group fishing that managed to get into some decent fish averaging 35 pounds while working a Porpoise pod about 25 miles to the southwest early in the week and several other groups that caught one or two fish per trip, but they were mostly blind strikes close to the beach. I still hear of an occasional nice sized fish caught at the Gordo Banks, but not enough of them to make it worth a trip up there for me. It looks like this bite may be done for the time being. On a short lived positive note, one of the local boats (thanks Mike!) spotted a very slow moving large vessel about 25 miles to the northwest of the lighthouse on Saturday and went over to check it out. It was a converted Shrimp boat towing a tuna pen at about 1 knot toward the southwest. Mike fished around it and said that he had to go at least a half mile away from the pen before he could set all his line for another pass, the fish were so thick near the pen that the lures were getting hit before he could get them all set. Plenty of Tuna, Dorado and Wahoo as well as Striped Marlin were trailing the pen as it was being towed. The Captain of the boat told Mike that there were two other pens being towed this was as well, but not how far away they were or how close they would pass to us. This was great for Mikes clients, they had a blast, and there will probably be at least half the fleet looking for the Tuna pen today.

    DORADO: Fish of the week as far as numbers go, there were plenty of Dorado everywhere you went. 100% of our clients caught Dorado this week and most of them limited out at 2 per angler. These fish were nice as well with the average in the 12-15 pound range. Anywhere on the Pacific side held Dorado but most of the boats were working near the shore out to 5 miles since that also gave them a good chance at a Marlin as well. There were also Dorado scattered all along the Cortez side of the Cape, but they did not seem to be there in the numbers that were found on the Pacific side. The best method this week as leaving the first fish hooked up in the water behind the boat and dropping back either live bait or strips of fresh bait and waiting for the school to show up. This week it seemed as if the fish were starting to school a little, not just traveling in twos and threes, so waiting about five minutes before giving up was the key. Oh, and all the fish around the Tuna pen on Saturday was a bonus, I just hope plenty of boats get into that action today!

    WAHOO: This may be the last hurrah's for our Wahoo this season as the water continues to cool down. We have just come through a l moon and the bite showed it as there were plenty of Wahoo out there if you wanted to target them, it's just that so many boats were focused on Striped Marlin and Dorado that the pressure was light. The fish ranged from We-hoos of 5-7 pounds to small fish of 8-15 pounds with an occasional 20-30 pound fish in the mix. Near shore drop-offs and ridges held the fish and trolling the usual arsenal of Rapallas and Marauders on wire leader was the best bet. There were plenty of fish caught on live bait as well, but many more of them were lost due to getting the mono-filament leader bit through than were caught. Mike caught six decent Wahoo off the Tuna pen.

    INSHORE: There were still some small Roosterfish along the beach this week but I expect this action to shut down as the water cools off. Most pangas were working within five miles of the beach for Dorado and Marlin, but those that went inshore for Sierra found a wide-open bite on fish from 3 to 4 pounds off the beach at Migraino. Small hootchies and rapallas trolled with a short wire trace racked up the fish. There were a few Yellowtail reported this week, but no numbers of them, just an occasional fish or two, and no large sizes.

    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!

    NOTES: Our winter season is approaching and as the water cools down we can expect the Striped Marlin bite to pick up as well as more Tuna start to show offshore. Inshore action should improve as well for Sierra and Yellowtail and I expect next month that Snapper fishing in the rocks during the full moon should be good. Let's keep our fingers crossed that the action continues on into our new year! This weeks report was written to the music of Richard Thompson on the 3 CD set “The History of Robert Thompson”, released in 1993 by RYKODISC. Dark, moody music from one of the co-founders of Fairport Convention. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the blog

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  5. #374
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec 24 - 30, 2012



    WEATHER: It has been an overcast week here in Cabo, and while it did not get cold enough to snow, a lot of us who live here full time are wearing long sleeved shirts and long pants to keep nice and warm. I know it's a bit laughable, but when it gets into the low 60's in the evenings we feel cold. With the overcast came a bit of wind on Thursday evening and Friday morning but then it calmed right down. Of course it has been cloudy all week, but a front moving down toward us from California may just end up pushing all this cloud cover away in a few days. And, well, there may be a bit of rain later today or tomorrow, at least the forecasters are saying it may happen. The clouds and weather are coming in from the southwest, just as they were doing last week and we can see a few areas of heavy precipitation approaching, it depends on how strong the front moving toward us is and how quickly it moves. Our daytime highs have been in the low 80's.
    WATER: The water temperatures were pretty steady this week as from the shoreline out to 12 miles from inside the Golden Gate to Punta Gorda the water was a consistent 77 degrees. North of Punta Gordo the water cooled to 75 degrees and north of Golden Gate Banks it cooled to 76 degrees. Out past the 12 mile line from the San Jaime Banks and to the southeast the water warmed to 79 degrees. The water was fairly blue everywhere with the exception of past Punta Gordo, once you got into the 75 degree water the color turned a very dirty green. Surface conditions were good everywhere with the exception on Thursday afternoon on the Pacific side when it became very choppy due to wind. Swells were fairly small at 2-4 feet on the Pacific side most of the week with a pick-up to 4-6 feet Thursday morning and on the Cortez side they remained at 1-3 feet until you got past Punta Gorda, then they picked up to 2-5 feet as wind kicked them up on the East Cape.
    BAIT: No change in the bait availability this week from last week. There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: I have no confirmation of this from any f captains yet, but according to someone who was watching, and knows what a Striped Marlin and a Black Marlin looks like, there was a bite on Black Marlin of 200 pounds off of the marina in San Jose on Friday. He says he saw several Striped Marlin brought in but that there were at least five, maybe six, Black Marlin brought in as well, they were all in the 200 pound range and they were reported to have been caught pretty close to shore. I would not be surprised too much, but it seems the water is too cold for there to be many of them around. I will do a bit more checking this week, but he swears they were not Striped Marlin and that the anglers were talking about the “white meat” of the fish. Elsewhere the Striped Marlin fishery has been steady, if just a bit slow. Many boats are coming in flying release flags, but there are also a lot of fish being boated as tends to happen during the holidays, the crews want the fish for parties and guilt the anglers into keeping them. Hey guys, it's your trip and you are paying, so just say “release”! Anyway, many of the fish have been found close to the beach, within several miles in most cases as they concentrate on the schools of bait along the shoreline. There has been no big concentration on them for most of the week, but for the first two days of the week the area off of Palmilla was reported to be holding large numbers of tailing fish that were willing to bite. A few boats came back from that area flying four flags!
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: We have finally had some Tuna show up! Not large numbers, or really big fish, but the kind of fish that keep anglers coming back for more. These are fish in the 15 to 35 pound class, large enough to put up a good fight on the right gear and enough of them to be able to take some fillets back home. I don't think I have seen a catch yet, at least on a regular basis that would allow you to fill a cooler (yes, I know a few boats have done it, but not many), but combine the Tuna with the Dorado and it is possible to get a full cooler of fillets. Of course Lady Luck has to pay a visit, but that's all part of fishing anyway! The fish have been found mixed in with the Porpoise and most of them have been along that 12 mile line from the San Jaime Banks and to the southeast of there. Cedar plugs, rapallas, dark colored hootchies and live bait have all caught numbers of fish with the larger fish coming on live bait or off of boats flying a kite. I did hear of some nice big fish still being caught at the Gordo Banks, but still not any large numbers, just the occasional nice cow sized fish.













    DORADO: I heard that the Dorado bite off of San Jose was really good this week as there were plenty of fish found that ranged from 15 to 25 pounds. Combine that with the few Cow Tuna and the “Black Marlin” bite and that may have been the place to go. Too bad it's at least 1 ½ hours up there for most of the boats, otherwise more would go to check it out. Closer to home the Dorado have been spread out with most of the fish found just off the beach on the Pacific side, out to about 2 miles. Quite a few boats were getting limits, but most of them were getting at least three or four nice sized fish. Slow trolling live bait was still the best method, with doing so under working Frigate Birds being the most productive. There were plenty of fish in the 10 to 15 pound class with a few fish approaching 30 pounds in the boats as well.
    WAHOO: The Wahoo bite was very good this week, at least in the San Jose area. Part of that could be due to the number of boats working the shoreline for Dorado and “Black Marlin”, after all, that's the Wahoo's preferred area. There were fewer fish caught in our area, but there were some nice ones brought in as we went through the full moon phase on Friday. Rapallas and Marauders in dark colors worked well and if you had a bit of a wire trace on your live bait you stood a chance of bringing in one as well, just less of a chance of getting Marlin or Dorado.
    INSHORE: I did not hear of anyone working the shoreline this week as the fishing for everything else was so good and the inshore fishing just so-so, but there were a few smaller Roosterfish and a few Sierra showing up. At this rate we should be seeing many more of these toothy little fish soon, and hopefully more Yellowtail as well.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: One of the reasons the fishing out of San Jose may be so good is the heavy winds up on the East Cape, the strong currents produced and the cold, green water. All of these combined may be pushing the fish that were there down toward us, and San Jose is the first concentration of anglers they get too. If that is the case, and the trend continues, we may be seeing a lot more fish in our area as well soon! Meanwhile, have a happy new year! Until next year, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  6. #373
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec 16-23, 2012



    WEATHER: It has been a strange week for us on the weather front as we started the week with a bit of high cloud cover then went into a period of sunny skies for a few days. After enjoying the sun it appeared that we had just been teased as the clouds moved in on Thursday morning. The rain began and it was on and off all day and night with an eventual dump of about 1 inch total. We expected the clouds to move away then but upon looking at the animated shots could see that this may last at least through the weekend, and perhaps even longer. I don't know if I should call this a “pineapple express” or not as it is coming at us from at least 800 miles south of Hawaii. There is a frontal system to the north of us that is preventing this system from going further north, if it lets up perhaps our skies will clear. Looking over my reports for the past 10 years we normally get this type of weather at the beginning of the year, and it is short lived giving us a little rain every week for about three weeks. One thing this has done for us is wash off all the trees and plants, giving back that green look, and of course it will help everything continue to grow. I just hope that since the weather is cooler with our lows in the high 60's that the mosquitoes and flies will not be as prevalent. Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80's.
    WATER: Once again due to the cloud cover there were no good shots of the surface temperature, but from what we could see and what was reported by the boats it appears as if the water temperature across the area has dropped another degree or two. On both the Cortez and on the Pacific side of the cape we had inshore water at 75 to 76 degrees while just offshore on the Cortez side it warmed to 79 degrees and on the Pacific side to 78 degrees. With the rain came murky inshore water and the off-color conditions extended out for about ½ mile around all areas where arroyos entered the ocean. The cloud cover was moving in from the southwest but the surface winds were from the north, and with the north wind came choppy sea conditions on the Pacific side. Swells from the southwest collided with the wind from the north and it was a bit uncomfortable, at least on Thursday and Friday. By Saturday the winds had died off and the water settled down. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water was very nice with small swells at 1-3 feet, and if you were within 10 miles of shore the wind had little effect on you.
    BAIT: There were bigger live baits such as Caballito (goggle-eye scad), some Mackerel (pacific greenback mackerel), Lisa (yellowtail mullet) and a few mixed baits available at the usual $3 each. Frozen horse-ballyhoo were available as well at $3 each and if you went north in the morning with plans to fish in the Punta Gorda area there were some Sardina available as well if you were there early, at the usual $25 a scoop.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Not surprisingly there are fewer and fewer Blue and Black Marlin reported as the water cools off, but I know of at least one boat that caught and released a Blue Marlin they estimated at #250, and this was reported by experienced anglers. The fish was found inside the 95 spot to 1150 line, an area this boat fished heavily for several days. The Striped Marlin bite continued to pick up, and we do expect the action on these guys to improve on a steady basis. Drifting the high spots along the shore on the Pacific side with live bait dropped deep is still the most constant producer, but more and more fish are being found on the surface. As the cool water continues to wrap around the Cape from the Pacific side the Striped Marlin are following, and the fishing is improving on a daily basis on the Cortez side of the Cape. This was nice to have happen this week as conditions on the Pacific side were a bit bumpy. I think that perhaps 75% of the boats that went out this week were able to hook into a Striped Marlin. Unfortunately there are still many of these fish being killed by the crews, even though the anglers want to release the fish. I keep seeing the buckets going up the docks with a Marlin folded into it and no longer wonder why so many boats refuse to use circle hooks, I know that the crews want to keep the fish, sigh.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Perhaps we will not see good Tuna action in our area until the beginning of the year, but there are still some cows being caught on the Gorda Banks every day. The fish have been under some heavy pressure but they are there, it is just a matter of spending the time, waiting them out, waiting for the bite to happen. Most of the action has been on chunk baits with hooks tied directly to the main line, and the fish are running between 150 and 250 pounds. Elsewhere the porpoise pods continue to be a hit-or-miss experience, with the first boats that find pods holding fish managing to get two or three in the 25 to 75 pound class and boats showing up a bit later just getting practice at trolling lures or soaking bait. I heard from a couple of private boats that there is an on-off bite on fish averaging 25 pound on the high points off of Punta Gordo, but they are getting there before sunrise to get into the bite, shortly after sunrise the local fleet pangas out of San Jose show up and the bite quickly drops off. Porpoise have been found from 5 miles due south to all along the 1,000 fathom line, so you never know when or where they may appear, you just have to keep your fingers crossed that the ones you come across hold tuna. The larger fish have been caught on live bait while lures, especially cedar plugs and dark colored feathers have been the best producers on the medium and smaller fish mixed with porpoise.













    DORADO: Dorado action continued, but at a reduced pace as the water continues to cool. Most of the action has been found within 5 miles of the beach on the Pacific side, and while there are fewer numbers, the size continues to improve. Many of the fish being found are in the 20-25 pound class, and most of these fish are being found under feeding Frigate birds, and caught on live bait tossed out directly under the birds. You have to be careful though, because these birds are also a good indicator of feeding Striped Marlin, and it has not been uncommon for a couple of baits tossed out to be inhaled by a pair of Marlin! My guess is that about 75% of the boats are coming in with Dorado these days, but only 20% of them are coming in with limits, compared with 60% coming in with limits two weeks ago. The Cortez side is now producing more Dorado as the warmer water is now in this area and the Pacific side is cooling off, so look for the bite to slowly move from the Pacific side to the Cortez side over the next few week.
    WAHOO: As always, a hit or miss fishery is the best way to describe the Wahoo bite. Mostly this week it has been a miss, but there are a few boats that are having fairly regular action of fish ranging from 20 to 35 pounds, as well as a few fish that are only as big as Sierra. Trolling lipped plugs like Rapallas, or swimming plugs like Marauders has been the best method of getting a Wahoo bite, but boats that are chunking or live baiting are getting bit as well, it's just that most of these bites are cutting the leader!
    INSHORE: The inshore bite has not changed from last weeks report with the exception of the fact that at the end of the week the areas around the arroyos have had dirty water due to the rain run-off. More and more Sierra are beginning to show up locally and while small at 3-5 pounds they have been biting when the schools have been found. Add in a few early Yellowtail to 20 pounds, a few red Snapper to 15 pounds and a few grouper to 20 pounds and the traditional inshore fishery is beginning to shape up nicely. Still, most of the Pangas are fishing slightly farther off the beach, taking advantage of the continued Dorado bite and the close proximity of Striped Marlin.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: We are seeing more and more whales showing up, both Humpbacks offshore and Gray Whales along the beach. Christmas is usually the start of the season for these guys (actually girls) to show up and they are not disappointing us this year. Just before the holidays is normally a slow time for tourism as family are staying home in celebration, but as soon as Christmas is over we expect to be very busy again, and hopefully the fishing continues to improve! My music choice for this week was the CD “Underground Whispers” by violinist Alex DePue and guitarist Miguel De Hoyas. I listened to this one again as Miguel was playing in Las Riberras this weekend and we wanted to go listen, but all the hotels and motels were sold out due to an off-road race taking place. I had to listen to the CD instead, sigh. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com


    From our house to yours!


    http://www.msn.americangreetings.com/ecards/display_facebook.pd?p=3344721&m=7635&i=470101282&s ource=agfb

  7. #372
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec 10 - 16, 2012



    WEATHER: It has been a strange week for us on the weather front as we started the week with a bit of high cloud cover then went into a period of sunny skies for a few days. After enjoying the sun it appeared that we had just been teased as the clouds moved in on Thursday morning. The rain began and it was on and off all day and night with an eventual dump of about 1 inch total. We expected the clouds to move away then but upon looking at the animated shots could see that this may last at least through the weekend, and perhaps even longer. I don't know if I should call this a “pineapple express” or not as it is coming at us from at least 800 miles south of Hawaii. There is a frontal system to the north of us that is preventing this system from going further north, if it lets up perhaps our skies will clear. Looking over my reports for the past 10 years we normally get this type of weather at the beginning of the year, and it is short lived giving us a little rain every week for about three weeks. One thing this has done for us is wash off all the trees and plants, giving back that green look, and of course it will help everything continue to grow. I just hope that since the weather is cooler with our lows in the high 60's that the mosquitoes and flies will not be as prevalent. Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80's.
    WATER: Once again due to the cloud cover there were no good shots of the surface temperature, but from what we could see and what was reported by the boats it appears as if the water temperature across the area has dropped another degree or two. On both the Cortez and on the Pacific side of the cape we had inshore water at 75 to 76 degrees while just offshore on the Cortez side it warmed to 79 degrees and on the Pacific side to 78 degrees. With the rain came murky inshore water and the off-color conditions extended out for about ½ mile around all areas where arroyos entered the ocean. The cloud cover was moving in from the southwest but the surface winds were from the north, and with the north wind came choppy sea conditions on the Pacific side. Swells from the southwest collided with the wind from the north and it was a bit uncomfortable, at least on Thursday and Friday. By Saturday the winds had died off and the water settled down. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water was very nice with small swells at 1-3 feet, and if you were within 10 miles of shore the wind had little effect on you.
    BAIT: There were bigger live baits such as Caballito (goggle-eye scad), some Mackerel (pacific greenback mackerel), Lisa (yellowtail mullet) and a few mixed baits available at the usual $3 each. Frozen horse-ballyhoo were available as well at $3 each and if you went north in the morning with plans to fish in the Punta Gorda area there were some Sardina available as well if you were there early, at the usual $25 a scoop.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Not surprisingly there are fewer and fewer Blue and Black Marlin reported as the water cools off, but I know of at least one boat that caught and released a Blue Marlin they estimated at #250, and this was reported by experienced anglers. The fish was found inside the 95 spot to 1150 line, an area this boat fished heavily for several days. The Striped Marlin bite continued to pick up, and we do expect the action on these guys to improve on a steady basis. Drifting the high spots along the shore on the Pacific side with live bait dropped deep is still the most constant producer, but more and more fish are being found on the surface. As the cool water continues to wrap around the Cape from the Pacific side the Striped Marlin are following, and the fishing is improving on a daily basis on the Cortez side of the Cape. This was nice to have happen this week as conditions on the Pacific side were a bit bumpy. I think that perhaps 75% of the boats that went out this week were able to hook into a Striped Marlin. Unfortunately there are still many of these fish being killed by the crews, even though the anglers want to release the fish. I keep seeing the buckets going up the docks with a Marlin folded into it and no longer wonder why so many boats refuse to use circle hooks, I know that the crews want to keep the fish, sigh.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: Perhaps we will not see good Tuna action in our area until the beginning of the year, but there are still some cows being caught on the Gorda Banks every day. The fish have been under some heavy pressure but they are there, it is just a matter of spending the time, waiting them out, waiting for the bite to happen. Most of the action has been on chunk baits with hooks tied directly to the main line, and the fish are running between 150 and 250 pounds. Elsewhere the porpoise pods continue to be a hit-or-miss experience, with the first boats that find pods holding fish managing to get two or three in the 25 to 75 pound class and boats showing up a bit later just getting practice at trolling lures or soaking bait. I heard from a couple of private boats that there is an on-off bite on fish averaging 25 pound on the high points off of Punta Gordo, but they are getting there before sunrise to get into the bite, shortly after sunrise the local fleet pangas out of San Jose show up and the bite quickly drops off. Porpoise have been found from 5 miles due south to all along the 1,000 fathom line, so you never know when or where they may appear, you just have to keep your fingers crossed that the ones you come across hold tuna. The larger fish have been caught on live bait while lures, especially cedar plugs and dark colored feathers have been the best producers on the medium and smaller fish mixed with porpoise.













    DORADO: Dorado action continued, but at a reduced pace as the water continues to cool. Most of the action has been found within 5 miles of the beach on the Pacific side, and while there are fewer numbers, the size continues to improve. Many of the fish being found are in the 20-25 pound class, and most of these fish are being found under feeding Frigate birds, and caught on live bait tossed out directly under the birds. You have to be careful though, because these birds are also a good indicator of feeding Striped Marlin, and it has not been uncommon for a couple of baits tossed out to be inhaled by a pair of Marlin! My guess is that about 75% of the boats are coming in with Dorado these days, but only 20% of them are coming in with limits, compared with 60% coming in with limits two weeks ago. The Cortez side is now producing more Dorado as the warmer water is now in this area and the Pacific side is cooling off, so look for the bite to slowly move from the Pacific side to the Cortez side over the next few week.
    WAHOO: As always, a hit or miss fishery is the best way to describe the Wahoo bite. Mostly this week it has been a miss, but there are a few boats that are having fairly regular action of fish ranging from 20 to 35 pounds, as well as a few fish that are only as big as Sierra. Trolling lipped plugs like Rapallas, or swimming plugs like Marauders has been the best method of getting a Wahoo bite, but boats that are chunking or live baiting are getting bit as well, it's just that most of these bites are cutting the leader!
    INSHORE: The inshore bite has not changed from last weeks report with the exception of the fact that at the end of the week the areas around the arroyos have had dirty water due to the rain run-off. More and more Sierra are beginning to show up locally and while small at 3-5 pounds they have been biting when the schools have been found. Add in a few early Yellowtail to 20 pounds, a few red Snapper to 15 pounds and a few grouper to 20 pounds and the traditional inshore fishery is beginning to shape up nicely. Still, most of the Pangas are fishing slightly farther off the beach, taking advantage of the continued Dorado bite and the close proximity of Striped Marlin.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: We are seeing more and more whales showing up, both Humpbacks offshore and Gray Whales along the beach. Christmas is usually the start of the season for these guys (actually girls) to show up and they are not disappointing us this year. Just before the holidays is normally a slow time for tourism as family are staying home in celebration, but as soon as Christmas is over we expect to be very busy again, and hopefully the fishing continues to improve! My music choice for this week was the CD “Underground Whispers” by violinist Alex DePue and guitarist Miguel De Hoyas. I listened to this one again as Miguel was playing in Las Riberras this weekend and we wanted to go listen, but all the hotels and motels were sold out due to an off-road race taking place. I had to listen to the CD instead, sigh. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  8. #371
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    Dec 3-9, 2012



    WEATHER: The air continues to get cooler every week, but I still don't think we are going to have a white Christmas in Cabo! This week on the way to the Golf Course I read a chilly 65 degrees, but it did warm up later on to 81 degrees. Our average early morning has been right around 71 degrees, down a bit from last week. The week started out with sunny skies and slowly the clouds moved in, and with the clouds came some wind. The wind really picked up on the Pacific side on Friday, building up some nice whitecaps and rollers making it very uncomfortable to fish, but that was the introduction to the cloud deck that hovered over us on Saturday. On Saturday the clouds settled in and the wind died down.
    WATER: Due to the cloud cover there were no good shots of the surface temperature, but from what we could see and what was reported by the boats it appears as if the water temperature across the area has dropped a degree or two. On both the Cortez and on the Pacific side of the cape we had inshore water at 77 to 78 degrees while just offshore on the Cortez side it warmed to 81 degrees and on the Pacific side to 80 degrees. On the Pacific side the water became a bit off-colored, not as clear as we had been getting the past several months. Due to the wind at the end of the week we did have several days when the Pacific side became very choppy, on the Cortez side the swells were small and the wind just created a small chop. Farther up the coast on the Cortez side, up past Punta Gordo the water conditions again became a bit rough due to the wind.
    BAIT: No change in the bait availability this week from last week. There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: As the water cools down the number of Striped Marlin that are being seen and are being caught continues to increase, and the number of Blue and Black Marlin caught decreases. As a matter of fact, I only heard of one Blue Marlin being caught this week, a small fish of about 200 pounds caught on the Cortez side out around the 1150 area. The Striped Marlin are another story though. It appeared that if you really wanted to catch a Striped Marlin all you had to do was wait. The fish were stacked up on the Lighthouse ledge, San Cristobal point and a few were on the Golden Gate bank again this week. Along with dropping bait down and drifting for them in these areas, boats were seeing more and more tailing fish on the surface, and getting more fish coming into the pattern when trolling lures. Over all though, the best method continued to be dropping live bait down 100 to 200 feet and waiting for a bite. As I mentioned last week, this is not my favorite method, but it sure does work. Trolling rigged Ballyhoo was also a great producer as long as there were fish in the area you were working. There are still a few Sailfish around to go with the Marlin, but not in any great numbers. The Striped Marlin have been ranging in size from 50 pound little guys to 180 pound fish with the average right around 110 pounds.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: There is still a lack of schooling Tuna in our area, even though once in a while a boat will find porpoise with Tuna on them. One of our clients this week was trying to get a Marlin on his Fly Rod and while looking for the right fish they found a pod of Porpoise that held tuna. When getting one to strike the fly proved unsuccessful they put out a live bait and brought in a nice 70 pound fish. Other boats soon arrived and for a little while there was some action. This has been the situation this week, at least to the south and the west. For boats going up to the Cortez side and working the Gordo Banks, there are still some nice big cows being caught, but as always, you really have to put in the time and effort to get one of them. Chunking with Bonito and Skipjack while chumming with Sardinas has been the preferred method for these freight train tuna. Farther up the coast there is still some action happening on the high spots as long as the wind is not blowing. There were a couple of really good days this week according to boats that made the run from here, but the earlier you arrived the better, and boats fishing out of San Jose did much better than boats out of Cabo as it is at least an hour closer for them.













    DORADO: The Dorado action dropped off quite a bit this week, probably due to the cooler water as the fish move and follow the warmer temperatures. Not that there were no fish, there just were not the numbers or concentrations we were seeing several weeks ago. As an example, boats fishing short trips close to home had a difficult time getting limits this week. It took a concentrated effort and a full day working the shoreline between Cabo and Todo Santos for one of our clients to come in with 9 very nice fish. Hard work as he said and the fish were scattered. It was steady action all day long with the largest fish going 35 pounds, several in the 25 pound range and the rest between 12 and 18 pounds. Slow trolling Ballyhoo in an area where a fish had been hooked up sometimes produced another fish, but the fish were not concentrated. The normal method of keeping a fish in the water as a decoy to bring in other fish in the school did not work well this week. Fishing Frigate birds was a good method, as always, of getting hooked up to a Dorado, but as the water cools the chances are just as good that the birds are working Striped Marlin as they are of the fish being a Dorado.
    WAHOO: The Wahoo bite slowed down quite a bit this week as we are going into the new moon phase, but there were still a few fish caught and more lost. The action as always was just off the rocky points and drop-offs of fish that ranged from wee-hoo's to 40 pound fish.
    INSHORE: More and more Sierra are beginning to show up locally and while small at 3-5 pounds they have been biting when the schools have been found. Add in a few early Yellowtail to 20 pounds, a few red Snapper to 15 pounds and a few grouper to 20 pounds and the traditional inshore fishery is begining to shape up nicely. Still, most of the Pangas are fishing slightly farther off the beach, taking advantage of the continued Dorado bite and the close proximity of Striped Marlin.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: Whale season in on its way, traditionally between Christmas and Easter, but there are a few showing up now. We finally got our Christmas tree up and have been watching specials on TV, getting into the spirit of Christmas. It's sometimes hard to do when the weather doesn't change! If you are thinking about coming to Cabo for a vacation and want to fish, check us out on our website, all we do is fishing, no tee-shirts sales, bait or gear, we concentrate on fishing!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  9. #370
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    November 26 – Dec 2, 2012



    WEATHER: Once again the lowest I saw the temperature this week was 72 degrees, low enough that I felt a slight chill (yes, I have lived where it has been warm on purpose and maybe my blood is a bit thin, lol!). With daytime highs in the high 80's it was a great week. We had mostly sunny skies and a bit of wind from the north on most days, once in a while shifting and coming at us from the northeast or east for a few hours, then switching back. It's not time for sweaters in the evening yet, and I am a bit surprised since looking back over the past 13 years worth of my reports it is normally five degrees cooler during this week.
    WATER: The water across the region was 81-83 degrees this week and once again we had no major temperature breaks. The only anomaly we had was an 85 degree hot-spot appearing across the 1150 and 95 spot on the 25th. The water on the Pacific side developed just a tinge of green late in the week while on the Cortez side it remained clean and blue. The surface conditions on the Pacific side were a bit on the bouncy side early in the week as we did have a fairly steady breeze at 12 knots from the north, at least until the middle of the week, and combined with 3-5 foot swells (long period though, no real steep stuff) it was uncomfortable for some people. The winds died off later in the week and it was much more comfortable by the weekend. On the Cortez side it was comfortable as usual with small swells at 1-3 feet and little wind until you got 25 miles out or up past Punta Gorda a ways, then the effects of the northerly breeze began to be seen.
    BAIT: There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina this week. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: Our water has remained warm enough for there to still be some Blue and Black Marlin around, and anglers have lucked into a few of them this past week. I know of one Blue Marlin that was brought in and weighed that was 425 pounds, caught due south of us at 15 miles, there was also a Black Marlin estimated at 400 pounds caught up on the Gordo Bank. Smaller Blue Marlin were reported as well, no great numbers but enough of them that the possibility of catching one was better than most years at this time. The Striped Marlin action has picked up, and I expect it to continue to improve as the water keeps cooling down. Many boats are releasing two to four fish per day using several methods to hook the fish. Sight casting to Marlin seen tailing down swell has always been a favorite here, and done by an experienced crew can be a really beautiful thing to watch. Fortunately the fish were feeding in the feeding mood this week, a surprise since we are just coming off a full moon. The most common method used this week is one of my least favorites, but very productive in certain situations. Using live bait bridled to the hook with 12 feet of leader, the leader is attached to the main line and a 3 to 5 ounce torpedo sinker is attached to the main line just above the swivel. The rig is lowered to just off the bottom and drifted until a fish bites. This works very well when the fish are concentrated in a certain area and won't come to the surface, or only come up in small flurries. The downside, and the reasons I don't really care for it is that it is boring, with no action happening for a long time, and the fact that there is so much line out, and so many boats using “J” hooks that too many fish are gut hooked and killed. The use of circle hooks while fishing this way should be mandatory, in my opinion, but of course there would be no way to enforce it. It is effective though, and was used a lot this week at the ledge off the Pacific lighthouse, the point off of San Cristobal and on the Golden Gate Bank.
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: The lack of consistent action on Yellowfin Tuna continues to amaze me, but as I look over the past years reports I noticed that the situation has been about the same every year, I am just getting antsy for the good action to happen! On a very positive note, there are still large Yellowfin Tuna being caught at the Gordo Banks, with several fish each day weighing over 100 pounds and an occasional fish over 200 pounds. The pressure on them has dropped off and I think that with enough time spent fishing for them there is a good possibility of hooking one of these larger Tuna. How much time would be needed is a gamble though, it could be an hour or it could be several days! Elsewhere, there have been football fish to 12 pounds caught all along the coastline on the Cortez side with most of the action concentrated on the northern inshore banks past Punta Gordo, but consistent (not red-hot) action has been found off of Palmilla, Chileno and Cabo Del Sol as well. The smaller fish have responded to chumming with Sardina (if you can get them) while the larger fish at the Gordo Banks have been biting on slow trolled live baits and drifted chunks. Offshore action on Yellowfin has been very spotty this week with only a few pods of porpoise holding fish. My records show that for the past 6 years this has been true, and the few offshore fish that have been caught have been found outside the 1,000 fathom line on the Cortez side or north of the Golden Gate Bank on the Pacific side.













    DORADO: OK, Dorado have returned to the top of the list and regained their title of “Fish Of The Week”. While I would not say it is “red-hot” it is as good as I have seen in a long time, and as it is fairly late in the season most of the fish are good sized, averaging in the 12-15 pound class with quite a few fish pushing the 25-30 pound range. Many boats have been able to limit out on these nice eating fish fairly quickly in the morning, leaving them plenty of time to try for Marlin or Wahoo the rest of the trip. Of course as with all fishing, the fish are where you find them , and getting in the right area was a necessity for a good catch. Trolling lures at 8 to 9 knots until hooking up, then slow trolling live bait in that area was one way, and worked very well. Leaving the first fish hooked up in the water until more fish appeared is an old tried-and-true method that continues to produce great catches. The only downside of course is that your fish may come off while using it as a decoy! Great action can occur when frigate fishing. Trolling as normal while scanning the sky for working Frigate birds, then running over to where they are working and tossing out live bait is exciting and very productive. These birds are not out there for sport, and they have much better eyes than we do so using them as spotters makes all kind of sense. We had several clients who limited out on Dorado early in the day this week using this method. Remember, the limit on Dorado is two fish per day, per person. If the Captain and crew have licenses they can count in your catch as well!
    WAHOO: This full moon phase has been great for Wahoo, not the day of the full moon but the days prior to and just after gave us steady action on Wahoo the ranged from 5 pounds (wee-hoo) to fish in the 40-50 pound class. Almost all the action occurred close to shore along the ledges, areas ranged from Vinorama on the Cortez side to Todo Santos on the Pacific side. Almost any point and any steep drop could hold these speedy fish. Fishing with Rapallas, Marauders, steel leader bullet head lures and rigged ballyhoo worked well. More fish were lost than caught since their razor-like teeth cut through mono leader easier than a hot knife through butter, but a lot of them were hooked in the corner of the jaw, that allowed anglers to get them to the boat. Not every boat caught these fish, but there were enough of them around that you had a decent chance.
    INSHORE: As the water cools down we have had a slight improvement in the inshore fishery, but most of the Pangas are still targeting the Dorado and Striped Marlin just off the beach. Those that are working the beach areas are finding decent numbers of small Roosterfish (to 15 pounds), and occasional early Yellowtail and and few early Sierra. These Yellowtail and Sierra are small ones, and I am going to get out this coming week and try to catch a dozen of the small Sierra to freeze up for rigged Marlin bait for next year! There have been decent catches of Snapper and Grouper on the bottom and plenty of Needlefish and Bonito on the surface.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: With Thanksgiving vacation over and Christmas yet to come, we are in a traditional slow time of year when it comes to the numbers of visitors we see. What this means for you is less pressure on the fish stocks and a better chance of hooking up! The weather is great, the fish are here, the whales are starting to appear and the golf courses are in great shape. Ready for a vacation? This weeks report was written to the music of Ernest Ranglin, if you like guitar, you have to listen to his version of “Stop That Train” from his album “Memories of Barber Mack”, a very infectious, toe tapping jazzy Jamaican instrumental! Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

  10. #369
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Cabo San Lucas
    Posts
    249

    Default Cabo Bite Report

    FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
    Captain George Landrum
    gmlandrum@hotmail.com
    www.flyhooker.com
    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/
    Cabo Fish Report
    November 19 - 25, 2012



    WEATHER: I almost put on a heavy long-sleeved shirt yesterday morning as it was 68 degrees outside! That is the coldest I have seen it so far this season and it felt great. As the day went on it warmed to 88 degrees and if that's not great weather, I don't know what is! We had a few clouds over us early in the week but then it cleared and we have had blue skies from Tuesday on through the weekend. The winds have been variable with a few gusty days starting the week, but things leveled out into the normal days flow with calm mornings and breezy conditions starting about noon. Most of the wind has been from northerly directions.
    WATER: There were no temperature breaks out there again, the water was a pretty even 81-84 degrees from up on the Pacific all the way to the East Cape, and it was clean, blue water as well. On the Pacific side the surface conditions were great in the mornings once we went past Tuesday, earlier in the week than that and it was a bit bumpy in the mornings due to the winds. The swells were coming in at 2-5 feet and spaced well apart, making it a smooth ride. On the Cortez side the winds were lighter and had little effect on the fishing between here and San Jose, I heard that the wind had more effect the farther up the coastline you went. The swells on this side of the Cape were small and insignificant at 1-3 feet.
    BAIT: The water has cooled a few degrees, down from the 86 degree water we were seeing a month ago and as a result there are a few Mackerel showing up as bait. Buying Mackerel or Caballito from the bait boats sets you back about $3 per bait and there have been very few Sardines this week here, but there have been a limited availability if you travel north to San Jose.
    FISHING:
    BILLFISH: With the water still warm enough there are still Blue and Black Marlin around, but no large ones that I heard of, and no great numbers either. The best results I know of in the past week on these larger fish came from the Pacific side as one of our clients had a double hook-up on small Blue Marlin. He was fishing solo and one fish came off right away, the other was released at the side of the boat after about an hour of fighting time, with plenty of pictures as it was held in the water. The fish looked to be about 225 to 250 pounds. Other boats reported hooking one now and then with almost all of them released or lost, I only heard of one that was brought in. As far as the Striped Marlin go, things are starting to pick up. This is nice to hear since things have been a bit slow. The cooler water bringing in the Mackerel has the Striped Marlin following them, and as most of the bait has been deep, the best results on Striped Marlin have been had by boats that are hooking up live bait and dropping it down to where the bait is. The usual areas such as the ledge off of the lighthouse, the point at Los Arcos and the mouth of Migraino Canyon, areas where the bait tends to stack up, have played host to many of the local fleet boats giving this method a try. Some boats have been working on the Golden Gate Bank as this is often the first area within easy reach for the fleet that these fish stack up on. A few more boats have been traveling as far as 50 miles up the coastline to the Finger Banks in the hope of getting into these fish early, before the pressure intensifies. Many of these fish have been small, between 50 and 90 pounds, but there have been a few large ones of over 200 pounds caught as well. While the fishing is picking up, it is still not a wide open bite, perhaps that will happen withing the next several months as the water cools even more and the Mackerel appear in force. We are really hoping to see large numbers of big Sardines as well, that was the major feed when we had the great fishing several years ago. Folks, if you are going to be Marlin fishing, remember that catch and release will ensure we have these fish for our children to catch!
    YELLOWFIN TUNA: The fantastic action that happened several weeks at the Gordo Banks continues to slow down. There were a few fish reported every day the week before last, this past week it was even slower with only a few large Tuna taken. Other than that, there were only a few reports of any Yellowfin being caught. One boat with our clients found a stump with the roots in the air about 25 miles out and caught a large number of football size tuna off of it, but the porpoise pods that have been found have been empty of fish life. Once in a while a Yellowfin has been caught by boats chumming heavily along the coast in front of the Cabo Del Sol area, but most of the fish coming in to these chum lines have been big Bonito.













    DORADO: I wasn't sure if I should call Dorado “fish of the week” again or not, since the bite dropped off, but they are still the most common catch. Again, most of the action has been on the Pacific side of the Cape and finding feeding Frigate Birds, being the first one there and slow trolling live bait has been the key to consistent catches. It's either that, or trolling lures until you hook a fish then keeping him in the water as a decoy, dropping back live bait or cut strip baits to any fish that come in to follow him. Both methods worked well for boats that only wanted Dorado. Quite a few fish were caught by boats dropping bait for Striped Marlin, a nice break when the bite on the big fish was slow, and putting something in the boat that was good to eat.
    WAHOO: As we approach the full moon the bite on Wahoo has improved a bit. I have heard reports from boats traveling to the Punta Gordo area and past there that they have been getting bit on a regular basis. Once that happened almost every one of them put out a trolling plug on wire leader and worked the area where they got bit. About half of them managed to get a fish in the boat. On the Pacific side the same thing has happened up the coastline toward Cerritos beach. There have been no big numbers of fish, there never are any great catches except by a few people who specialize in these speedsters, but the bite has improved, and hopefully they will remain around for the next month or so.
    INSHORE: Inshore fishing remains slow with most boats working outside the beach area for Dorado. Those we have had out, mostly fly fishing, have reported occasional Dorado, small Roosterfish, plenty of Needle fish and green Jacks and loads of Bonito. Working the bottom has produced a few nice snapper and a couple of grouper as well.
    FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
    NOTES: Thanksgiving is over and we had a really great time with 30 people attending, lots of food and drink. The only downside was no football! Our TV system (at home)has been having problems for several months and we thought it was finally fixed as the TELMEX tech. Came Thanksgiving at noon, did a quick check and said he would be back in an hour after doing some switch work downtown to improve our service. 30 minutes later, no TV, no Phone Line, no Internet, nada. He finally returned the next day and we still have no TV, sigh. Everyone had a great time anyway, so all is good. Until next week, tight lines!



    And as always, George writes this report

    and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

    can't wait, click the "FOLLOW" on the top of the

    page! You will know whenever something new is posted!



    http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

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