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Thread: California


  1. #7
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Contact: Bob Muir, (213

    Contact: Bob Muir, (213) 217-6930; (213) 324-5213, mobile
    April 10, 2007
    <font color="aa00aa"><font size="+2">METROPOLITAN BOARD ASSUMES LEADERSHIP ROLE IN APPROVING
    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE PLAN FOR DELTA LEVEES </font></font>

    Catastrophic levee failure in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta would impact
    state’s $1.6 trillion economy, drinking water supplies for 25 million Californians
    Guarding against a disaster comparable to what New Orleans experienced during Hurricane Katrina, Metropolitan Water District’s Board of Directors today approved an emergency preparedness and response plan for the levee system that supports the fragile Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
    With water supplies for 25 million Californians and more than half of the state’s $1.6 trillion economy at stake, Metropolitan will look to integrate the strategies into an interim emergency delta operations plan being prepared by the state Department of Water Resources over the next two months.
    “Planning and preparing for a significant earthquake or severe flooding that could cause multiple levee failures across the delta is one of the most important issues facing California,” said Metropolitan board Chairman Timothy F. Brick.
    “Any disruption or significant failure of the delta’s levee system would likely lead to the loss of drinking water supplies for major population centers in the San Francisco Bay area and San Joaquin Valley, as well as Southern California for up to three years,” Brick said.
    Created in the late 1800s as a complex of levees, the delta developed as land was drained and reclaimed for agriculture at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Delta islands have over time subsided up to 30 feet because of farming and the deterioration of peat soils. Today, more than 1,100 miles of levees protect delta islands that are interlaced with major utilities, highways and railroads, and provide for the passage of freshwater delivered through the federal and state water systems.
    more . . . . .

    -2-
    Under a DWR scenario, a hypothetical earthquake measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale near the western delta could simultaneously lead to 50 levee breaches and the flooding of 20 delta islands, disrupting the state’s water delivery system that currently provides more than half the imported supplies available to Metropolitan.
    “The risks, however, extend beyond the reliability of drinking water supplies,” Brick said. “Delta levee failures also could cause serious water quality problems by greatly elevating salinity and total organic carbon levels, as well as invasive algae species.”
    The strategy approved by Metropolitan’s board would require the pre-positioning of materials and equipment to allow for timely levee repairs and closure of delta channels in the event of an earthquake or flooding.
    Under the plan, an emergency pathway could be re-established through existing delta channels in about six months to deliver freshwater supplies to the state and federal water pumps. Depending on the scale of the emergency, Metropolitan estimates a state plan, based on MWD’s strategy, would cost about $200 million to execute.
    In another action, Metropolitan’s board established rates and charges for fiscal year 2007-08 for all components of the district’s tiered rate structure, which breaks down the agency’s rates into separate commodity charges that reflect the wholesale costs to treat, deliver and develop supplies.
    Included in the adopted plan is a $30-per-acre-foot increase in the district’s wholesale rate for the first tier of treated water deliveries to its 26 member public agencies, effective January 1, 2008. The adjustment reflects the cost of power resources, and operating, maintenance and capital costs for treatment plant expansions and refurbishments.
    ###
    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving 18 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.

  2. #6
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default California Hunting Dog Enthusiasts Can't Catch a Break

    California Hunting Dog Enthusiasts Can't Catch a Break (04/09)
    California
    Join our e-mail alert list

    California sporting dog owners must act now to stop legislation that will make it a crime to breed hunting dogs.

    Assembly Bill 1634, sponsored by Lloyd Levine, D-Van Nuys, will require all dogs over four months of age be spayed or neutered. The owner must pay for and qualify to receive a virtually unattainable permit if a dog to be exempted. Assembly Bill 1634 will be heard in the Assembly Business and Professions Committee on April 10 at 9:00 a.m.

    “California hunting dog enthusiasts must let lawmakers know that they will not be forced to give up their passions because of poorly-written, unjust legislation,” said Rick Story, USSA senior vice president. “Tell state lawmakers that you oppose this overreaching bill that will outlaw the breeding of quality hunting dogs.

    The anti’s have marked California’s hound hunting traditions for elimination, but a vigilant sportsmen’s community continues to strike back.

    In 2006, the USSA led sportsmen to protect their hobbies and hunting interests by blocking a bill that threatened hunting dog competitors and field coursers. Three years earlier, sportsmen got behind a USSA campaign to defeat legislation that would have banned bear hunting, fox hunting, rabbit hunting, raccoon hunting and more.

    Take Action! California sportsmen should attend the Assembly Business and Professions Committee hearing on April 10 at 9:00 a.m. AB 1634 will be heard in Room 447 of the State Capitol in Sacramento. Attend and demonstrate the hunting dog community’s opposition to AB 1634, an excessive bill that will devastate the future of hunting.

    Those who cannot attend should contact their assembly members and ask them to oppose AB 1634. Explain that the bill criminalizes dog owners that legitimately breed hunting dogs. Let them know you oppose the establishment of unattainable regulations to receive an exemption. To contact your assembly member, call (916) 445-2323 or use the Legislative Action Center at www.ussportsmen.org.

  3. #5
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolit

    Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolitan, &#40;213&#41; 217-6930; &#40;213&#41; 324-5213, mobile
    Richard Hansen, Three Valleys MWD, &#40;909&#41; 621-5568
    Sondra Elrod, IEUA, &#40;909&#41; 993-1747; &#40;909&#41; 730-7573, mobile
    April 2, 2007
    RESIDENTS IN EASTERN LOS ANGELES, WESTERN SAN BERNARDINO COUNTIES
    ASKED TO SUSPEND OUTDOOR WATER USE DURING PIPELINE SHUTDOWN

    Urgent repairs on major large-diameter water line to begin April 16,
    affecting more than 1 million consumers from La Verne to Fontana
    More than 1 million consumers in eastern Los Angeles and western San Bernardino counties are being called upon to suspend outdoor watering and non-essential indoor water use while a major regional water pipeline is taken out of service for nine days for urgent repairs beginning Monday, April 16.
    Officials from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Three Valleys Municipal Water District, Inland Empire Utilities Agency and local retail water agencies made the water-saving request today as Metropolitan prepares for the repair of its Rialto Feeder pipeline.
    In response to the shutdown, consumers in the cities of La Verne, Claremont, Chino, Chino Hills, Montclair, Rancho Cucamonga, Upland and Fontana are being asked to save water and stretch local supplies.
    “Water agencies and cities throughout this area will either seek voluntary and, in some cases, mandatory reductions in water use during this repair period,” said Richard Atwater, general manager of the Inland Empire Utilities Agency. “Residents who want to know more about how the shutdown will affect them should contact their water provider directly.”
    Richard Hansen, Three Valleys general manager, said conservation by consumers and businesses is essential to help complete the pipeline repairs without disruptions in service.
    “This is a critical repair coming as spring weather commences. We all need to do our part to reduce water use while the repairs are made,” Hansen said. “Along with following our conservation request, residents also may consider postponing their spring plantings until after the shutdown.”
    --more--

    -2-
    Debra C. Man, Metropolitan’s chief operating officer, said the 96-inch-diameter Rialto pipeline was inspected earlier this year as part of efforts to install upgrades along the water line. Man said recent inspection results revealed a weakened pipeline section needing immediate attention.
    Metropolitan routinely schedules shutdowns of its facilities in winter months, when temperatures usually are cooler and demands are lower, to complete inspections and perform maintenance and upgrades with the least impact on consumers, Man said.
    The 30-mile Rialto Feeder extends from the Devil Canyon Power Plant north of San Bernardino to Metropolitan’s San Dimas Power Plant, delivering up to 450,000 gallons of imported water a minute for about 6 million total residents.
    The pipeline is the only source of supplemental water for communities served by the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, which relies on Metropolitan water for about 30 percent of its water supply needs. Three Valleys, which uses Metropolitan water for up to 60 percent of its needs, has the ability to receive imported water through an alternate MWD pipeline.
    Due to the immediate need to repair the line, water agencies have a limited amount of lead-time to prepare and coordinate water supplies and storage. In routine maintenance situations, Metropolitan typically provides six to eight months for agencies to prepare. With a major water source cut off, some water agencies have issued a more stringent call for conservation measures to ensure there is an adequate supply for its consumers.
    Before pipeline repairs begin, residents and businesses will be asked to do their part to ensure reservoirs and local supplies won’t be drained. Steps include stopping outdoor watering of landscapes and lawns, hand-washing vehicles, filling swimming pools or spas, and hosing down driveways and sidewalks beginning April 16 until the pipeline repairs are complete April 24.
    Other water-saving measures can include running only full loads of clothes washers and dishwashers, not leaving the water running when washing dishes, keeping showers to a maximum of 10 minutes and not leaving the water running when brushing your teeth or shaving.
    Residents should be aware that some municipal parks and landscape areas that are irrigated with recycled water will not be impacted by the shutdown.
    For more conservation tips and water-saving rebate information, residents and businesses can visit “www.bewaterwise.com.”
    ###

  4. #4
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default PRESS RELEASE Contacts: Mich

    PRESS RELEASE
    Contacts:
    Michelle Tuchman, MWDOC, &#40;714&#41; 593-5014; &#40;949&#41; 689-3056, mobile
    Bob Muir, Metropolitan, &#40;213&#41; 217-6930; &#40;213&#41; 324-5213, mobile
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    <font color="ff0000">WATER LIMITED IN ORANGE COUNTY
    DURING CONSTRUCTION WORK AT LOCAL TREATMENT PLANT</font>

    Residents, businesses urged to aggressively conserve water
    during week-long facility shutdown
    &#40;March 20, 2007&#41;—Residents and businesses throughout Orange County are being asked to
    aggressively reduce their water use while a major regional water treatment plant undergoes
    upgrades during a week-long shutdown beginning Sunday, March 25.
    Officials from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and Municipal
    Water District of Orange County joined local water agencies in making the water-saving request
    as Metropolitan prepares for the planned shutdown of its Robert B. Diemer Water Treatment
    Plant, located in Yorba Linda, through Saturday, March 31.
    Metropolitan’s Diemer plant is the primary source of imported treated drinking water to
    communities served by MWDOC, as well as the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Santa Ana.
    The plant provides about 95 percent of south Orange County’s potable water needs via two
    regional water pipelines.
    “Although some water agencies in south Orange County will institute mandatory
    restrictions during this shutdown, most agencies in north Orange County will have groundwater
    supplies to call upon to meet retail demands,” said Debra C. Man, Metropolitan’s chief operating
    officer. “As a precaution, however, we’re asking all consumers in the region to voluntarily
    conserve water whenever and wherever possible.”
    To minimize impacts on consumers, Metropolitan routinely schedules operational
    shutdowns of its water-treatment facilities during the winter months, when temperatures are
    typically cooler and demands are lower.
    “All Orange County water providers have prepared for months to ensure their
    customers have sufficient supplies during this planned shutdown,” said Kevin P. Hunt, general
    manager of the Municipal Water District of Orange County, which manages the water supply the
    county receives from Metropolitan.
    -- more --
    PRESS RELEASE
    PLANT SHUTDOWN MARCH 25-31
    2-2-2-2
    &#34;However, we are asking residents and businesses to help us in our effort to maximize
    the amount of water we have on-hand while the Diemer plant is out of service,” he continued.
    Curtailing landscape irrigation, which consumes approximately 60 percent of all water
    used in Orange County, is perhaps the easiest way to conserve throughout the week, Hunt said.
    Other outdoor water-saving practices include sweeping down driveways and walkways.
    The Diemer plant shutdown is part of $155 million in construction under way at the
    facility to improve the plant’s treatment processes and modify chemical handling capabilities,
    said Eddie Rigdon, Metropolitan’s water system operations manager. Projects include site work
    and relocation of existing facilities in preparation for adding a new ozone disinfection system.
    Work at the plant is expected to continue through 2011.
    “Maintaining and improving our ability to store, process and deliver drinking water
    throughout Southern California requires periodic curtailments in deliveries while the work is
    being done,” Rigdon said.
    MWDOC’s Hunt said voluntary water conservation by consumers, combined with
    activation of system interconnections between water agencies, will offer added safeguards to
    help ensure that residents and businesses have adequate water during the shutdown. The
    cooperating agencies, however, stand prepared to intensify the conservation request should
    locally stored supplies dwindle during the outage.
    For more water-saving tips visit www.bewaterwise.com. Information about special
    water-savings rebates available to Orange County residents and businesses is available on
    www.mwdoc.com. Click on Rebate Programs.
    ###

  5. #3
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolit

    Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolitan, &#40;213&#41; 217-6930; &#40;213&#41; 324-5213, mobile
    Richard Hansen, Three Valleys MWD, &#40;909&#41; 621-5568
    Sondra Elrod, IEUA, &#40;909&#41; 993-1747; &#40;909&#41; 730-7573, mobile
    Feb. 1, 2007
    CONSUMERS IN EAST LOS ANGELES, WEST SAN BERNARDINO COUNTIES ASKED TO REDUCE WATER USE DURING PIPELINE SHUTDOWN
    Work on major large-diameter water line to begin Monday &#40;Feb. 5&#41;,
    affecting consumers from La Verne to Fontana
    Residents and businesses in the east Los Angeles and west San Bernardino counties are being called upon to make plans to reduce outdoor watering and non-essential indoor water use while a major regional water pipeline is upgraded during a seven-day shutdown beginning Monday &#40;Feb. 5&#41;.
    Officials from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Three Valleys Municipal Water District, Inland Empire Utilities Agency and local retail water agencies made the precautionary water-saving request today as Metropolitan prepares for the planned shutdown of its Rialto Feeder. The shutdown is scheduled to run through Sunday, Feb. 11.
    Affected areas include the cities and communities of La Verne, Claremont, Chino, Chino Hills, Montclair, Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Upland and Fontana.
    “Water agencies and cities throughout this area will either seek voluntary and, in some cases, mandatory reductions in water use during this period,” said Richard Atwater, general manager of the Inland Empire Utilities Agency. “I encourage consumers who want more information to contact their local water provider directly.”
    Richard Hansen, Three Valleys general manager, said conservation by consumers and businesses would be essential to help endure the shutdown without further disruptions or inconveniences.
    &#34;During this time of year, landscape experts tell us lawns should easily be able to last the entire shutdown without water,&#34; Hansen said. &#34;If it isn&#39;t raining, you may want to deep water your lawn and landscaping over the weekend. Just be prepared to reduce your outdoor water use beginning Monday &#40;Feb. 5&#41;.”
    Debra C. Man, Metropolitan’s chief operating officer, said the district routinely schedules
    -more-

    -2-
    repairs and improvements of its facilities in winter months, when temperatures usually are cooler and demands are lower.
    “These shutdowns permit us to complete inspections and perform necessary maintenance and upgrades with the least impact on consumers,” Man said. “The upgrades are essential to maintain reliable water deliveries to communities and businesses.”
    In upgrading the Foothill Feeder, Metropolitan plans to install concrete vaults in the 8-foot-diameter pipeline that will eventually house isolation valves to be installed in the future, Man said. The district also plans to replace a 20-foot pipeline section, as well as inspect portions of the line.
    The 30-mile Rialto Feeder extends west from the Devil Canyon Power Plant near San Bernardino to Metropolitan’s San Dimas Power Plant, delivering up to 450,000 gallons of imported water a minute for 6 million residents. The pipeline is the only source of supplemental water to communities served by the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, which relies on Metropolitan water for about 30 percent of its water supply needs. Three Valleys, which uses Metropolitan water for up to 60 percent of its needs, has the ability to receive imported water through an alternate MWD pipeline.
    Before work on the pipeline begins, residents and businesses are asked to plan to do their part to ensure reservoirs and local supplies won’t be drained. Steps include reducing outdoor watering of landscapes and lawns, hand-washing vehicles, refraining from filling of swimming pools or spas, and hosing down driveways and sidewalks Feb. 5-11.
    Other water-saving measures can include running only full loads of clothes washers and dishwashers, not leaving the water running when washing dishes, keeping showers to a maximum of 10 minutes and not leaving the water running when brushing your teeth or shaving. Additional water-saving tips can be found at “bewaterwise.com.”
    The call for outdoor conservation is consistent with Metropolitan’s ongoing region-wide public outreach campaign that encourages reductions in outdoor water use through more efficient irrigation and use of native, drought-tolerant plants in landscapes.
    For more information, consumers and businesses are asked to contact their local water provider:
    East Los Angeles County:
    City of La Verne &#40;909&#41; 596-8744 Golden State Water Co. &#40;800&#41; 999-4033
    &#40;City of Claremont&#41;
    West San Bernardino County:
    City of Chino &#40;909&#41; 464-8368 Fontana Water Company &#40;909&#41; 822-2201
    City of Chino Hills &#40;909&#41; 364-2806 Monte Vista Water District &#40;909&#41; 624-0035
    City of Upland &#40;909&#41; 291-2935 City of Ontario &#40;909&#41; 395-2678
    Cucamonga Valley Water District &#40;909&#41; 987-2591
    ###

  6. #2
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Jan. 19, 2007 Contacts: Bob M

    Jan. 19, 2007
    Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolitan, &#40;213&#41; 217-6930, &#40;213&#41; 324-5213, mobile
    Eric Bergh, Calleguas MWD, &#40;805&#41; 579-7128
    Jeff Reinhardt, Las Virgenes MWD, &#40;818&#41; 251-2124
    WATER AGENCIES LAUNCH ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN CALLING FOR URGENT WATER SAVINGS BY RESIDENTS, BUSINESSES
    Unseasonably high demand, pipeline repairs stretch water supply thin
    in portions of Los Angeles, Ventura counties
    An advertising campaign launched today calls for residents and businesses in western
    Los Angeles and southern Ventura counties to suspend outdoor watering and non-essential
    indoor water use temporarily while repairs to a large-diameter pipeline continue.
    The campaign—initiated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California,
    Calleguas Municipal Water District and Las Virgenes Municipal Water District—expands the
    water-saving call beyond portions of Ventura County to include western Los Angeles County.
    “The recent dry, windy and uncommonly cold weather conditions have nearly doubled
    water demand at a time when demand is typically at its lowest,” said Debra C. Man,
    Metropolitan’s chief operating officer. “With water supplies stretched thin in the northernmost
    part of our service area, we need everyone to do their part to save water while important repairs
    are made to our water system.”
    More than 600,000 people reside in the affected areas served by Calleguas and
    Las Virgenes, including the cities of Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Camarillo, Hidden Hills,
    Moorpark, Oxnard, Port Hueneme, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks and Westlake Village, as well
    as the community of West Hills.
    Beginning this morning &#40;Friday&#41;, radio advertisements, primarily during traffic reports,
    can be heard on 14 radio stations in English and Spanish through the end of the shutdown on Jan.
    27. The water-saving message also will be delivered in print advertisements.
    Don Kendall, Calleguas general manager, said conservation by consumers and businesses
    is essential to help sustain water supplies during the shutdown.
    more . . . . .
    -2-
    “The unusually high water demand is coming from our municipal customers, not from
    agriculture,” Kendall said. “These are critical repairs that need to be made, and every single
    person can make a difference.”
    Residents and businesses are asked to stop watering landscapes, plants and trees, handwashing
    vehicles, and refrain from filling swimming pools or spas and hosing down driveways
    until the repairs are made to Metropolitan’s Foothill Feeder pipeline. The 20-foot-diameter
    pipeline stretches 13 miles from Lake Castaic to Metropolitan’s Joseph Jensen Water Treatment
    Plant in Granada Hills, delivering supplies originating in Northern California.
    Other water-saving measures include running only full loads of clothes washers and
    dishwashers, keeping showers to 10 minutes or less, and not leaving the water running when
    brushing your teeth or shaving. The advertisements point out that more tips can be found at
    www.bewaterwise.com.”
    In response to the high demand and local agency concerns, Metropolitan postponed some
    Jensen plant upgrades to greatly reduce the time the plant would be out of service. Metropolitan
    crews worked around the clock earlier this week to complete a portion of the scheduled work and
    put the plant back into operation nearly eight days ahead of schedule. With water provided
    through a connection with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Metropolitan began
    providing limited amounts of treated water to the affected areas, lessening the impacts on
    residents.
    In the meantime, work continues to replace and repair sections of pre-stressed concrete
    pipe at three locations along the Foothill Feeder.
    Metropolitan typically schedules shutdowns of its facilities in the winter months, when
    temperatures are cooler and demands are lower, to complete inspections and perform
    maintenance and upgrades with the least impact on consumers, Man said. However, the unusual
    spike in local water demands, exacerbated by frigid and dry conditions, has complicated this ongoing
    shutdown, she said.
    The call for outdoor conservation is consistent with Metropolitan’s ongoing region-wide
    public outreach campaign that encourages reductions in outdoor water use through more efficient
    irrigation and use of native, drought-tolerant plants in landscapes.
    ###
    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving 18 million
    people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local
    supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management
    programs.

  7. #1
    Jerry LaBella (Admin) Guest

    Default Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolit

    Contacts: Bob Muir, Metropolitan, &#40;213&#41; 217-6930; &#40;213&#41; 324-5213, mobile
    Eric Bergh, Calleguas MWD, &#40;805&#41; 579-7128
    Jan. 11, 2007
    WATER TO BE LIMITED IN SOUTH VENTURA COUNTY WHILE
    REGIONAL TREATMENT PLANT, LARGE PIPELINE ARE SHUT DOWN, UPGRADED

    Consumers asked to voluntarily reduce water use
    Residents and businesses in south Ventura County are being called to voluntarily reduce their water use beginning Sunday, Jan. 14, while a regional water treatment plant is upgraded and a large-diameter pipeline is repaired during a 14-day shutdown.
    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California joined the Calleguas Municipal Water District in making the precautionary water-saving request as Metropolitan prepares for the planned shutdown of its Joseph Jensen Water Treatment Plant and Foothill Feeder pipeline. The outage is scheduled to last until Jan. 27.
    The Jensen plant in Granada Hills—one of five such treatment facilities within Metropolitan’s distributions system—is a significant source of drinking water for Ventura and Los Angeles counties. The 13-mile Foothill Feeder stretches from Castaic Lake to the Jensen plant, delivering state project supplies imported from Northern California through the California Aqueduct.
    Although most local agencies affected by the shutdowns will have groundwater, reservoir supplies and other sources to meet retail demands during the outage, some pockets will need consumers to conserve water to stretch supplies, said Debra C. Man, Metropolitan’s chief operating officer.
    “As a precaution, we’re asking consumers in the region to voluntarily conserve water whenever and wherever possible over the 14 days,” Man said.
    Consumers—particularly in the cities of Camarillo, Moorpark, Oxnard, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks and Port Hueneme and communities of Camarillo Heights, Fairview, Las Posas Valley, Oak Park, Santa Rosa Valley, Lake Sherwood, Point Mugu, Somis and Port Hueneme—are asked to contact their local water supplier to determine water-use restrictions for their area.
    more . . . . .

    -2-
    While Metropolitan will upgrade and test the Jensen plant’s back-up emergency power generation systems during the shutdown, Foothill Feeder repairs are the primary reason for the outage, Man said. During the shutdown, Metropolitan plans to replace and repair sections of pre-stressed concrete pipe at three locations along the 21-foot-diameter pipeline.
    “Maintaining and improving our ability to store, process and deliver drinking water throughout our Southern California service area requires periodic curtailments in deliveries while work is being done,” Man said.
    Metropolitan routinely schedules shutdowns of its facilities in winter months, when temperatures usually are cooler and demands are lower, to complete inspections and perform maintenance and upgrades with the least impact on consumers.
    Don Kendall, Calleguas general manager, said voluntary water conservation by consumers, combined with activation of system interconnections between water agencies, will offer safeguards that residents and businesses have adequate water during the shutdown.
    “We, however, stand prepared to intensify the conservation request in the unanticipated event that locally stored supplies dwindle during the outage,” Kendall cautioned. “Residents who want to know more about how the shutdown will affect them should contact their local water provider directly.”
    Kendall added that the quality of tap water may be impacted to varying degrees within the Calleguas service area because the reduction in imported water deliveries may require increased use of groundwater within the region.
    “As more local groundwater is pumped, some water users may notice a change in the aesthetics of their tap water,” Kendall said.
    ###
    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving 18 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.

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