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Thread: Florida

  1. #828
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Jupiter / Palm Beach, Florida
    Posts
    88

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    Snookseason closes June 1st and the monster fish are everywhereyou look. The docks, seawalls, flats and deep passes all are holdingfish. Top water heddon spooks during low light hours createsexplosive action for anglers, DOA 4' C.A.L. Jerk bait with 1/8 ouncejig head and live baits worked through out the day will keep the dragscreaming as well. The average size of the snook has been 2 to 25pounds.


    Tarponfishing is hot in the inlets and ICW, the beaches as well areproducing fish when seas allow. Live baits drifted with the tidecreates strikes, DOA C.A.L. 3' shad tail gold and glow with 1/8 ouncejig head great way to jump a silver king. Tides are the key todancing with the silver kings and be sure to have a good rod andreel, always bow to the king. Average size of the tarpon has been 5to 80 pounds.


    Warmweather has the peacock bass bit going off. The peacock are hangingalong seawalls, docks , drop offs, bridges and shorelines. Fastmoving lures like a DOA C.A.L. 4” jerk bait rigged weedless ingold and glow, or figi chix gets the strike. Top water plugs like aheedon spook jr entices great explosions well. Fly fishing is anothergreat way to battles these colorful beauties, small deceivers andminnow patterns work great.


    Thebest thing about fishing in south Florida there are so many speciesto target in our local waters especially exotic species. Mayancichlids, oscars, clown knife fish and many others are caught willroaming the freshwater water ways. These species are very active aswater temperatures rise and DOA lures, fly fishing and live baitswill get the rod bent.


    Wellthat is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and gethooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 5616444371

  2. #827
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Jupiter / Palm Beach, Florida
    Posts
    88

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    May has been full of excitement foranglers though the winds have been moderate at times, causing roughconditions. This month should produce great fishing as long as theweather patterns hold true to the past.


    Snookaction is fantastic around docks, seawalls, and shorelines being themain targets. The snook are very active early morning and lateafternoon. Live baits and top water plugs work great along seawallsand flats. DOA C.A.L. 4” jerk baits in glow / gold rush bellygreat choice of color for working docks. The full moon coming thismonth will trigger the spawn for the snook. This is the time when thebig female fish gather in the local inlets, offering snook catcheswell into the double digit numbers but sizes from 15 to 30 pounds notuncommon.

    Tarponare starting to show in local inlets but the big pods of fish arestill migrating south from the Stuart area. The back bays still holdjuvenile fish, these fish are willing to take live baits and DOATerror Eyz in pearl black back and rootbeer color great choices towork on the bottom. Look for rolling fish as signs of life in thearea, be sure to get in front of the fish and avoid spooking them.


    Thegrass flats and channels will offer great cation for snook, trout,reds and snapper. Liev baist great choice to get the bite but jigsand jerk baist aslo will put a bend in your rod. Look for fastmoving water to locate fish and clean water is key as well.


    Thepeacock bass action great along bridges shorelines and docks. Flyfishing is my favorite but many like to use live shiner and shad forexplosive action. The peacock bass are very active as the sun warmsthe waters. Clown knife fish are another exotic species for angler ttango with they are fun and pull hard on light tackle.


    Wellthat is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and gethooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

  3. #826
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Jupiter / Palm Beach, Florida
    Posts
    88

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    Mayhas arrived and the inshore fishing will produce great catches foranglers. The baits schools start to show and seas begin to calm, getyour ready its time for some rod bending action.


    Snookaction is fantastic around, docks, seawalls, and shorelines. Thesnook are very active early morning and late afternoon. Live baitslike thredfins, mullet and pinfish free lined with a circle hooktrigger strikes, corks may be used when working deeper holes thiskeeps the bait near surface creating disturbance for predator fish tokey in on. Top water heddon super spooks excellent choice for workingseawalls and shallow flats , chartreuse head and bone back has beenthe best color as of late. Dock fishing nothing beats a DOA C.A.L. 3inch shad holographic or glow holographic on a ¼ jig head. The glassminnow pods have been thick so mimic the bait schools and game on.Fly fishing deceivers in white or olive and white belly great choicefor working the back waters, docks and seawalls, lighter the tippetthe more strikes. The full moon coming this month will trigger thespawn for the snook. This is the time when the big female fish gatherin the local inlets, offering snook catches reaching double digitnumbers.

    Tarponare starting to show in local inlets but the big pods of fish arestill migrating south from the Stuart area. The back bays still holdjuvenile fish, these fish are willing to take small mullet, greeniesand pinfish. DOA C.A.L. 4 inch jerk baits holographic and glowholographic on a ¼ ounce jig head get the tarpons attention. Lookfor rolling fish as signs of life in the area, be sure to get infront of the fish and avoid spooking them, stealth is the key.


    Thegrass flats are holding big schools of glass minnows and the trout,snook, jacks,bluefish and many others are wrecking havoc on thesebaits. DOA C.A.L. 3 inch shad in holographic or pearl rigged weedlessgreat tactic for getting strikes, fly anglers small deceivers andpopper flies in white or gummy minnows perfect flies for getting therod bent.


    Freshwaterside the peacock bass continue to provide explosive action for topwater lure and flies. From sun up to sundown the action isconsistent. Angler looking to produce big numbers, live shiners willprovoke steady action. Artificial enthusiasts DOA C.A.L 3 inch shad in candy corn rigged weedless or with a chugger head is deadly baitfor peacock and large mouth bass as well. The large mouth bass arevery aggressive along the edges of channels and along sea walls.Early morning and evening anglers top water heddon spook jr in babybass or okee shad excellent colors for consistent hook ups.


    Wellthat is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and gethooked up. Tight Lines! Capt. Craig Korczynski,PhlatsInshoreFishing.com, 561-644-4371

  4. #825
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Bonita Beach, FL, United States
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    268

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    Red tide has been lurking around our area for weeks now, but had not impacted fishing until this week--Fishing offshore is still great, when seas are calm enough. But bay fishing right now is pretty much off the table until this red tide dissipates.

    We have been in a windy pattern for a good while around here, but seas were only supposed to be two-to-three feet on Thursday, 4/12, when I headed offshore with frequent fishers, Ron Musick, Eddie Alfonso, and Richard Arnett. The actual seas were three to four and a half feet most of the day, though it calmed down nicely in the late afternoon. The guys used cut bait and squid in spots ranging from 12 miles to 22 miles west of New Pass to catch sixteen lane snapper, including six keepers, along with a mess of grunts. They released a dozen red grouper shorts to 19 inches, along with a 13-inch triggerfish. The highlight of the day was when a 10-foot tiger shark bit on a blue runner, and ran Eddie around the boat to the point of exhaustion, before finally breaking the line!

    Saturday morning, 4/14, seas were still choppy, so a near-shore trip sounded best for Ted and Marla Bachrach and their young daughter Kate, along with Jeff High and his young son, Sebastian. We fished about 12 miles west of New Pass, using cut-bait and squid. The group loaded up on grunts, boxing eighteen of those to 12 inches. Marla was lucky enough to catch a nice, 18-inch flounder to add to the box. The group released a few squirrelfish. They also got to see a tiger shark, estimated at about eight feet long—It bit a small grouper that was being reeled in, but light tackle was no match for that big boy! We tried hooking a blue runner on a heavy pole, but the tiger shark showed no interest in that, choosing to attack the small grouper we were reeling up instead. He finally broke the line and headed out. The kids also got to see some leaping dolphin, so they were happy with the fishing and the sightseeing. The photo shown below is of Marla Bachrach with the 18-inch flounder she caught.

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    Seas finally calmed sown after a few days of small craft advisories and cancelled trips, and I fished in spots 22 to 24 miles west of New Pass on Wednesday, 4/18, with Brad Cornell and Tony Stincon. The lane snapper bite was on, and the guys used squid and cut-bait to catch 40-some keeper-sized lanes, but released about ten of those, since they had no need for that many fish. They also released twenty-two red grouper shorts to 18 inches, a 20-inch gag grouper, and one true black grouper. They also battled and released a 40-inch blacknose shark.

    The lane snapper were still biting well on Thursday, 4/19, when I fished 22 miles west of New Pass with John Abernathy and his son, Ryan. They boxed two dozen lanes to 14 inches, which bit on squid and cut-bait. They released several red grouper shorts and blue runners.

    On Friday, 4/21, John and Ryan Abernathy brought Ryan’s sister, Becky along to fish a catch-and-release trip in the backwaters of southern Estero Bay. The tide was going out all morning, and there was a good bit of red tide in the Wiggins Pass area. The family used live shrimp to catch and release two crevalle jacks, each about 3 pounds, along with a black drum and three sheepshead.

    After a few days off the water, as busy season winds down, I fished offshore 22 miles from New Pass on Tuesday, 4/24, with Roy Mittman and Scott Fritz. Using squid and cut-bait, the guys boxed nineteen keeper lane snapper to 16 inches, and released fifteen red grouper shorts.

    Ron Musick, Eddie Alfonso, and friends Michael, Lou, and Lou’s dad, Bill, fished 35 miles west of New Pass with me on a nice, calm day, Thursday, 4/26. The guys caught a cooler full of snapper, using squid for bait. They boxed forty+ lane snapper keepers, fifteen vermilion snapper keepers, five yellowtail snapper keepers that were all around 13 inches, and one 13-inch mangrove snapper keeper. They added a half dozen nice- sized grunts to the box, all around 14 inches. They also released thirty-some red grouper shorts, and Eddie battled and released an 8-foot sandbar shark.

    The photo shown is of Larry Pflederer with a 17-inch sheepshead, caught on shrimp in Estero Bay on a recent inshore Fishbuster Charter.
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    You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishing videos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

  5. #824
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Bonita Beach, FL, United States
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    268

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    Sunday morning, 2/25, I headed out to 19 miles west of NewPass to fish with Charles Bisgaier and his friend, Andy. The red grouper bitewas active, and the guys released twenty red grouper shorts to18 inches, alongwith two mangrove snapper shorts. They loaded the cooler with twenty-onegrunts, all around 14-to 15 inches, along with one 14-inch porgy.

    Todd Plastaid, his three sons, Alec, Brennen and Dave, theirfriend, Cam Field, and the boys’ grandfather, John Plastaid, fished 24 mileswest of New Pass with me in calm seas on Monday, 2/26. The family used squidand cut-bait to catch twenty-one keeper lane snapper to 16 inches, a dozengrunts 12-14 inches, and three keeper porgies. They released twenty-six redgrouper shorts to 18 inches, along with a 14-inch triggerfish.

    Mikeand Kristen McCarthy and their five-year-old twin sons, Danny and Jonathan,fished southern Estero Bay's backwaters with me on Tuesday, 2/27. Kristenlanded a nice, 17-inch trout, and the boys had fun catching andreleasing ten sheepshead to 12 inches and two mangrove snapper to 10inches. Everything bit on shrimp. The boys enjoyed fishing, but had even morefun watching a dolphin or two chase the boat for a good while, and also sitinga manatee.

    MikeConneally, his brother-in-law, Rodney Bromm, and friend, Jim Schaber, fished 24miles west of New Pass with me on Wednesday morning, 2/28, where they usedcut-bait and squid to box seventeen lane snapper keepers, a 13-inch mangrovesnapper, and a few grunts. They released twenty-one red grouper shorts to 18inches.

    Frequentfishers, Ron Musick, Eddie Alfonso, and Richard Arnett fished 24 miles offshorewith me on Thursday, 3/1, and used squid and cut-bait to box twenty-one lanesnappers to 14 inches and two keeper mangrove snapper to 14 inches, along witha few grunts. They released twenty-two red grouper shorts to 17 inches.

    Fridaymorning, 3/2, Kathy Kunscher and the McNally family—Seth and Val and theiryoung children, Liam and Alta—fished southern Estero Bay with me, using liveshrimp. The group caught a 17-inch permit and two sand bream, and released ahalf dozen sheepshead shorts and a dozen mangrove snapper shorts, along withfour big sailcats that were all about five pounds. Red tide was obvious, but itwasn’t impairing our catching!

    BobEckle and friend, Ken, had to nix their plans to fish in the gulf on Saturday,3/3, with strong winds and surf causing a small craft advisory to be issued foroffshore. We fished in southern Estero Bay, using live shrimp, and the guyscaught and released a drum and two sheepshead, while boxing two keeper mangrovesnapper.

    Frequentcustomer, Mike Connealy, wanted to treat his brother-in-law, Rodney Bromm, tosome sport fishing for big fish on Monday, 3/5, so we headed out about fifteenmiles to one of my goliath grouper spots. The guys caught a bunch of bluerunners for bait, and then caught and released four goliath grouper, oneestimated at 40 pounds, two estimated at 60 pounds, and one estimated at 90pounds. They figured the fun was worth the sore arms that would no doubtresult!

    BartArrigo, joined by friends, Steve, Doug, and another Steve, fished 35 milesoffshore with me on Tuesday, March 6th. The guys were busy catchingall day, using squid and cut-bait to box sixteen vermillion snapper, nineteennice-sized porgies, three 15-inch grunts, two 13-inch mangrove snapper, and two14-inch yellowtail snapper. They released three dozen red grouper shorts and afew gag grouper shorts.

    Weathercanceled out four consecutive trips, with various combinations of high windsand seas, rain, and low tides. I finally got out fishing again on Tuesday,3/13, when I fished the backwaters of southern Estero Bay with Tom Schilli, hiswife, and their two grandsons Steven and Sonny Barclay. The family used liveshrimp to catch and release a dozen sheepshead to 12 inches, four black drum to14 inches, six mangrove snapper shorts, and a 14-inch sand bream.

    MikeJansen, his son-in-law, Matt Menting, and Matt’s seven-year-old daughter, Lily,fished in Estero Bay with me on Wednesday morning, 3/14, using live shrimp. Wehad a great morning o sheepshead catching, boxing thirteen keeper sheepshead to19 inches and releasing a dozen more consisting of shorts and some keepers thatweren’t needed. The family also boxed a 17-inch trout, and they released a17-inch snook, along with a dozen short mangrove snapper.The photo shown belowis of Matt Menting with a 17-inch trout.
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    MikeJenson and Matt Menting fished with me again on Thursday, 3/15, this timejoined by Mike’s son, Chris Jenson, to fish offshore. Seas were choppy earlyon, but we all knew they would be and we were prepared for the three-to-fourfoot seas we encountered heading out to 19 miles west of New Pass. Seas calmeddown later in the morning, as predicted. The guys used squid and cut-bait toloan up on lane snapper, boxing twenty keepers to 14 inches. They added to thebox a 14-inch mangrove snapper, a nice 17-inch mutton snapper, a 14-inch porgy,and a 13-inch grunt. We had to be quick to boat the mutton snapper, since an8-foot hammerhead shark was in pursuit of it, but we got the mutton safely intothe boat. The guys also released five yellowtail shorts, along with a 9-footsandbar shark. The photo shown below is of Chris Jansen with a 17-inch muttonsnapper.
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    IanMcKinnon, his son-in-law, Remi Nickel, and Remi’s three young sons, Mark, Lukeand Jack fished 19 miles west of New Pass with me on Friday, 3/16. The kids hadfun catching a mess of grunts to 12 inches, and releasing blue runners andshort red grouper. But the highlight of the trip was when we caught thehammerhead that I had seen lurking in the area the previous day—he bit on ablue runner on a heavy rig, and we were able to get some good video beforereleasing him.

    St.Patrick’s Day Saturday, I fished from 19 to 23 miles offshore with Darren andLinda Rachman and their friends, Craig and Heather Laudenslager. The group usedcut-bait and squid to box twenty grunts to 14 inches, a half-dozen lane snapperto 14 inches, a 15-inch porkfish, and a 13-inch porgy. They releasedtwenty-five red grouper shorts.

    You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

  6. #823
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Bonita Beach, FL, United States
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    Monday, 2/5/18, I fished with frequent customer, Ron Musick, joined by friends who are visiting for a few days. We used cut-bait and squid to fish spots out to 28 miles from New Pass. The spots that have consistently yielded lots of lane snapper have not been doing so recently, and this day was no exception. But, the group did catch over twenty nice-sized porgies, along with some grunts. They released twenty-five red grouper shorts, along with a 15-inch mutton snapper.


    On Wednesday, 2/7, Craig Royal and family fished 24 miles west of New Pass with me, where there continued to be lots of small bait fish around, and keeper fish seemed scarce, despite steady action. The group released a couple dozen red grouper shorts to 18 inches, along with two big lizard fish about 19 inches each. They did box three keeper lane snapper and a dozen grunts, all of which bit on squid and cut-bait.


    Roy Mittman fished in various spots out to 25 miles west of New Pass with me on Monday morning, 2/12. Once again, the red grouper bite was active, but yielded no keepers, and we released over twenty shorts. Keepers included lane snapper and grunts, which bit on squid.


    Tuesday, 2/13, I spent the morning fishing the backwaters of southern Estero Bay with John Pompeo and his son, John, Jr. The guys used live shrimp to catch ten sheepshead to 15 inches and a 16-inch black drum.
    Bob Ellis and his friend, Tim, fished about 15 miles west of New Pass with me on Wednesday 2/14, where they used cut-bait and squid to release four red grouper shorts and two gag grouper out-of-season shorts to 21 inches. They boxed a 15-inch sheepshead, a keeper porkfish, and three grunts.


    Eddie Alfonso, Kay Daugherty, and Liz Condos fished 17 miles west of New Pass with me on Thursday, 2/15, using cut-bait and squid. The group released red grouper shorts to 18 inches, along with a would-be-legal (if in season) gag grouper, and a 16-inch triggerfish. They caught a mess of grunts, so fish tacos were still on the menu, even with having to release the other catches.







    The photo shown is of Liz Condos with a 24-inch, out-of-season gag grouper, caught on cut-bait and released.


    After a couple of days off the water, due to a family event, Mike Bochman and his friend, Kevin joined me to fish 20 miles offshore on Monday, 2/19. Seas got progressively choppier throughout the morning. The guys used squid and cut-bait to release fifteen red grouper shorts to 19 inches, along with a 15-inch scamp grouper. They loaded up on grunts for fish tacos.


    Mike McCarthy and friends, Ken, Tim and Eddie, fished in various spots out to 35 miles west of New Pass with me on Tuesday, 2/20. We had steady action at the 35 mile spot, where the guys released over thirty red grouper shorts to just short of 20 inches, inches, five gag grouper to 22 inches, several yellowtail snapper shorts, and a few banded rudder fish, all around 18 inches. They loaded up their cooler with lots of 15-inch porgies and 15-inch grunts. Everything bit on squid and cut-bait.


    Seas were choppier than predicted, with some rain off Naples, on Wednesday morning, 2/21, when I fished 18 miles offshore with Mark Dutkewych and his young son, Nick. The guys caught and released a dozen red grouper shorts and a dozen or so grunts before calling it a morning.


    Wayne Geall and friends, Tucker Seabrook, Carm, and Clay, fished the backwaters of southern Estero Bay with me on a windy Thursday morning, 2/22. Using live shrimp, the group caught sixteen sheepshead, including one nice keeper at 19 inches. They also released two mangrove snapper shorts, a spadefish, three black drum, and a brace of two-pound stingrays.





    The photo shown is of Tucker Seabrook with a 19-inch sheepshead, caught on shrimp in Estero Bay.


    It was another windy morning in southern Estero Bay on Friday, 2/23, when I fished a catch-and-release trip with Bob and Mary-Lou Schwartz and their grandchildren, Hannah and Tyler. The family used live shrimp to release a 17-inch black drum, two would-be-keeper mangrove snapper at 11 inches each, a lady fish, nine sheepshead shorts, and a 22-inch sailcat.


    You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishing videos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

  7. #822
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Kenner, La
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    Saltwater Fishing Articles & More by Outdoor Writer Jerry LaBella
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  8. #821
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Bonita Beach, FL, United States
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    268

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    After a few days of cold temperatures, high winds, and rough seas, causing me to cancel a couple of trips, Saturday, 1/20/18, was finally calm enough to get offshore. I fished in spots from 18 to 28 miles west of New Pass with Joe Hahn and his friends, Bob, Mike, David, and George. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release a bluefish, twenty-some red grouper shorts to 18 inches, as well as five sharks, consisting of four blacktips and one sharpnose, all of which were around the 40-inch mark. We also had a huge shark (variety unknown) grab a piece of cut-bait, run, and break off, exploding the water around us. As for dinner, the guys boxed eighteen keeper lane snapper.


    Monday morning, 1/22, I fished 22 miles west of New Pass with Frank Dwyer and his son-in-law, Ryan. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release twenty-six red grouper shorts, and to cull ten keeper lane snapper to 13 inches, along with a half-dozen 13 to 14-inch grunts.


    Tuesday morning, 1/23, I headed out in a light drizzle with Drew VanWerden and his two young sons. Seas were calm, and we headed out 22 miles, but the rain persisted, at one point turning into a heavy shower. We had enough wet-weather gear to keep us dry, and the boys didn’t mind fishing in the rain and in the fog that followed. They used squid and cut-bait to catch and release a 17-inch cobia, twenty-one red grouper shorts to 18 inches, and lots of grunts to 12 inches. The lane snapper were biting well, and the guys caught twenty-seven keeper lanes to 13-inches.


    Winds picked up ahead of another cool front moving into the area, and that produced some choppy sea conditions on Wednesday, 1/24. But, long-time customers and hardy father-son anglers Larry and Chris Baumgartner weren’t intimidated! They fished 22 miles west of New Pass with me in a stiff 20-to-25 knot wind most of the morning, and used squid and cut-bait to catch a variety of fish. They lost one big grouper that swam to the bottom and cut the line, and they released red grouper shorts, an 18-inch gag grouper, and a 14-inch scamp grouper. They also caught five mangrove snapper, three of which were keepers ranging 13 inches to 15 inches. They caught over twenty grunts, and boxed a few of the largest of those, along with four porgies in the 13-to-14-inch range.


    Frequent customer Mike Connealy and his son, Clint, had to trade their offshore plans for some inshore, catch-and-release fishing on a very windy Friday morning, 1/26. There were small craft advisories offshore, and even the bay presented some challenges in a relentless wind of about 25 knots. The guys used live shrimp to catch and release thirteen sheepshead to 13 inches, two crevalle jacks that were each about 12 inches, and a 15-inch black drum.


    Winds persisted through the weekend. I fished inshore in southern Estero Bay on Sunday, 1/28, with Stan and Jean Dzedzy and their son and daughter-in-law, Dave and Debbie. The family used live shrimp to catch three keeper sand bream, a 15-inch drum, a 17-inch drum, and a 17-inch pompano. They released fifteen sheepshead shorts and two mangrove snapper shorts. The photo shown is of Dave Dzedzy with a 17-inch pompano, caught on shrimp on his inshore trip 1/28/18.

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    Monday, 1/29, I awoke to light rain and fog, with another cold front expected to arrive over-night and into Tuesday. Seas were choppy first thing in the morning, and it remained misty after the fog lifted, but seas calmed a little by mid-morning. I began fishing at the near-shore reefs with Lee Larsens and his friends, Carey, Jerry, and Rick, but there was very little action there. So, as seas calmed down a bit, we ventured out further to about fifteen miles offshore. Fishing was tough everywhere, and I can’t recall the last time I saw such slow action at several of my typically productive spots. The guys used squid and cut-bait to catch and release two whitings, a few blue runners, one red grouper short, and a few grunts.


    With small craft advisories issued for Tuesday, 1/30, and predictions for seas of four-to-six feet, I canceled my planned offshore trip, which had already been rescheduled from the previous week’s rough weather!
    By Thursday, 2/1, seas were finally calm enough to get out about 23 miles west of New Pass, where I fished with frequent customers, Ron Musick, Richard Arnett, and Eddie Alfonso. There were tons of little bait fish everywhere, and lots of undersized fish biting, but the guys were able to box some food-fish, consisting of three keeper lane snapper, a 13-inch mangrove snapper, two porgies, and a few nice-sized grunts. They released twenty-plus red grouper shorts and four mangrove snapper shorts. Everything bit on squid and cut-bait.


    Friday morning, 2/2, seas were calm when I fished a catch-and-release trip 19 miles west of New Pass with William Connors, Mike Connors, and friends Dan, Mark, and Pat. The guys used squid and cut bait to catch and release twenty-four red grouper shorts, a mess of grunts, and mangrove snapper to 16 inches. The photo shown is of Mike Connors with a 16-inch mangrove snapper, caught on squid on his offshore trip 2/2/18.


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    Winds picked up on Saturday, 2/3, and we were back to choppy seas offshore, with a small craft advisory issued. So, Roman Jahnke and his dad, Tom, who were treating Roman’s son, Roarke, to a fishing trip for his tenth birthday, traded offshore plans for some inshore fishing on the flats of southern Estero Bay. The family used live shrimp to catch five keeper black drum to 16 inches, and they released ten sheepshead shorts, a crevalle jack, and two stingray that were each about three pounds.

    You can see all of our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
    239 947-1688
    fishbuster@comcast.net
    http://www.fishbustercharters.com

  9. #820
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Bonita Beach, FL, United States
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    As 2017 was drawing to a close, I had hoped that the good fishing weather we had over Christmas week would hold steady. But on Saturday, 12/30/17, when I fished with Rich Driscoll, Sr. and Rich Jr., joined by son Jack and his cousin, Sadie, sea conditions changed by about mid-day, and got progressively choppier, as the winds changed direction and picked up speed. We had made it out 22 miles from New Pass, and the group used squid and cut-bait to catch and release nearly forty red grouper shorts, along with a few puffer-fish. They had a couple of good battles with shark also, but never got them boat-side, since they broke the line before that could happen. The family boxed a few food-fish, including three keeper lane snapper, some grunts, and a porgy.

    Given the choppy conditions of the previous day, despite NOAA’s predictions for two-to three foot seas offshore, I advised Mark Smith, his two young sons, Harry and Charlie, and his father-in-law, Harry Stevenson, to fish inshore in southern Estero Bay on Sunday morning, 12/31. We fished an incoming tide, and the family had good action on live shrimp. They caught nine keeper black drum to 18 inches and a 16-inch sheepshead. They released a dozen shorter sheepshead, a sand bream, and a 20-inch snook.

    Chris Pammer, his ten-year-old son, Jack, and his eleven-year-old brother, Jake, fished a chilly and windy mid-morning inshore trip with me in southern Estero Bay on Thursday, 1/4. We allowed the sun to warm things up a bit before we departed at 10AM, but it remained chilly, thanks to this strong cold-front that is visiting us for a few days. The boys had fun using shrimp to catch twenty sheepshead, including four nice keepers to 16 inches. They also released a 16-inch redfish, and a few small black drum.

    Friday morning, 1/5, was another chilly, windy one. Isaac Wengerd treated his eight-year-old son, Henry, and four-year-old son, Gus, to a backwater fishing trip in southern Estero Bay. The boys bundled up, and had fun using live shrimp to catch seventeen sheepshead, including five keepers ranging in size from 13 to 16 inches. They also caught a 16-inch black drum, and they released a 16-inch snook and one mangrove snapper short.

    Seas were pretty rough throughout the weekend and first part of the next week. Thursday was finally calm, and long-time customer, Ron Musick, was ready for his first offshore trip of the season, joined by friends, Eddie Alfonso and Richard Arnett. The guys fished in various spots from 18 to 22 miles west of New Pass, using squid and cut-bait. They boxed twenty-five grunts to 14 inches, along with five keeper lane snapper and four porgies. They released a dozen red grouper shorts.

    Friday, 1/12, was a windy day, just ahead of another strong cold front headed to our area. With four-foot seas offshore, John Thomas, Matt Smith, Craig Sims and Steve McKey traded in their offshore plans for a morning of fishing in the backwaters of southern Estero Bay, where they used live shrimp to catch a conglomerate of over fifty fish. The guys were in town for a conference, and had no need for keeping fish, so they released all, including about forty sheepshead to 15 inches, nine black drum to 16 inches, and several crevalle jacks.

    The photo shown below is of John Thomas with a 16-inch black drum, caught on shrimp in Estero Bay.
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    It was tough fishing in Estero Bay on Monday, 1/15, with the cold front having sucked the water out of the backwaters, and extreme low tides, even at their highest point. Jack Oberlin and friend, Perry, were not interested in keeping fish, since they were on a short stay at an area hotel, so, we’d planned on a catch-and-release trip. The guys used live shrimp to catch and release fifteen sheepshead to 14 inches, and that was the only species biting, so they didn’t get much variety, but at least got some action!


    Another cold front arrived on the heels of the previous one, with high winds and seas accompanying it, as well as some pretty frigid temperatures for SW FL! Looks like conditions will normalize for the weekend, so I’m looking forward to a planned offshore trip for Saturday.

    The photo shown is of Mark Venturin with a nearly 20-inch red grouper, caught on squid and released on a recent offshore trip.
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    You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishing videos.html
    Captain Dave Hanson
    Fishbuster Charters, Inc.
    Bonita Beach, FL
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  10. #819
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Jupiter / Palm Beach, Florida
    Posts
    88

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    Januaryhas finally brought cold and windy conditions. This weather is greatfor stirring up the water s getting those fish inshore moving around.Figure out the patterns and you will be rewarded, patience is a must.


    Theinshore waters are teaming with life, with many species to targetwhether you are fly fishing, live baiting, or using artificial lures,you can get your rod bent. Sheepshead have been all over sea wallsand dock pilings. They will not shy away from live shrimp or crabs.In the mix with the sheepshead, snook are holding near seawalls aswell in search of heat. The snook are biting great in the midafternoon on , live bait and DOA C.A.L. 3” shad tail.


    Tarponare roaming the back waters, sleek silver giant, this fish will getthe heart thumping. Tarpon are full of so much energy, its hard notto get excited when you feel the drag screaming and the acrobaticsleaps of the silver king. The back bays have been excellent fortargeting the silver king with top water plugs, live bait and DOATerror Eyz.


    TheGrass flats are still great areas to catch a plethora of speciesconsisting of ladyfish, trout, pompano, snapper, drum, and jacks.All of these species will gladly take a DOA C.A.L. 3' shad tail orlive shrimp in there vicinity.


    Freshwateraction has been consistent even with the cool weather. The peacockbass and the large mouth bass are both staging in deep holes. Liveshiners and DOA C.A.L. 3' shad and DOA Terror Eyz great choices toget the rod bent. Mid day produces the best bite for anglers.


    Wellthat is the fishing report for the past week, hope you all enjoyed.Remember you cant catch them from the couch, so get out there and gethooked up. Tight Lines! Craig Korczynski, PhlatsInshoreFishing.com,561-644-4371

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